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  1. What do the icons for stamp types represent?
  2. What do the icons on an event stamp represent?
  3. What do the attributes on an event stamp represent?
  4. What do the attributes of a personal traveler represent?
  5. What do the attributes on a postal represent?
  6. What do the attributes mean on an LTC?
  7. What do the attributes for a traditional box represent?
  8. What are the different types of letterboxes?
  9. What do the subtype icons on traditional boxes represent?
  10. What do the subtypes in a traditional tracker represent?
  11. What do the attributes for LTC trackers mean?
  12. What do the subtypes in an LTC tracker represent?
  13. What do the attributes stand for in a postal tracker?
  14. What do the subtypes in a postal tracker represent?
  15. What do the subtypes on a blog represent?
  16. What do the attributes on trips represent?
  17. What do the subtypes on trips represent?
  18. What do the attribute icons stand for in an event listing?
  19. What do the subtype icons stand for in an event listing?
  20. What do the attribute icons on custom themes mean?
  21. What do the subtype icons on custom themes mean?
  22. What are the differences between group types?
  23. How do I narrow down the hundreds of boxes available?
  24. Why should I register?
  25. What are keywords?
  26. How do I delete a find in my logbook?
  27. Should I get permission before hiding a letterbox?
  28. What do the icons next to a member's trailname mean?
  29. Pennsylvania State Parks
  30. How do you limit searches to "drive-by"?
  31. Is it possible to search for letterboxes along the Interstate highways?
  32. What printer/toner combinations work with which transfer methods?
  33. Is there an Android app for Atlas Quest?
  34. Is there an iPhone app for AQ?
  35. What are preferences for the Stamp Exchange?
  36. How do I switch between metric and imperial measurement units?
  37. Is it possible to change the theme displayed on Atlas Quest?
  38. How do I change my trailname?
  39. National Park Service (NPS)
  40. How do I send pictures through AQ mail?
  41. How do I add AQ anniversary widget to My Page?
  42. What do the icons stand for in a traditional letterbox?
  43. If you print the QR code on your clues when you go to log your find where do you scan the code?
  44. How do I package a set of LTCs for a tracker?
  45. How do I list a LTC on AtlasQuest?
  46. What information goes on the back of an LTC?
  47. What is an LTC?
  48. When starting a tracker, who can I contact for advice?
  49. How do I host an LTC tracker?
  50. How do I trade an LTC?

What do the icons for stamp types represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 11:25:00 PM
AttributeDescription
The creator promises you’ll find a genuine, 100% hand-carved stamp in the letterbox and not a store-bought or custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a unique, custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a store-bought stamp rather than a hand-carved or custom-made stamp.

What do the icons on an event stamp represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 08:21:10 PM
Stamp Types
AttributeDescription
The creator promises you'll find a genuine, 100% hand-carved stamp in the letterbox and not a store-bought or custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a unique, custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a store-bought stamp rather than a hand-carved or custom-made stamp.

Attributes
AttributeDescription
A traveling event stamp goes from event to event, making multiple appearances.
A table top box is often located on the tables where letterboxers gather at an event, sometimes in disguise and sometimes in plain view, but it also includes any stamp that is located there only for the duration of the event anywhere near the point of the gathering. While most are located on tables, they may also be found in ice chests, on the ground, and sometimes very clever locations.
Hidden In Plain Sight (HIPS) are boxes that are laying around at an event, but aren't obviously a box. Clues aren't needed in order to find these—just be alert and observant of your surroundings. Maybe it's hidden in a salt shaker. Or maybe it's disguised as a soda can. Or maybe....

What do the attributes on an event stamp represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 08:20:51 PM
AttributeDescription
A traveling event stamp goes from event to event, making multiple appearances.
A table top box is often located on the tables where letterboxers gather at an event, sometimes in disguise and sometimes in plain view, but it also includes any stamp that is located there only for the duration of the event anywhere near the point of the gathering. While most are located on tables, they may also be found in ice chests, on the ground, and sometimes very clever locations.
Hidden In Plain Sight (HIPS) are boxes that are laying around at an event, but aren’t obviously a box. Clues aren’t needed in order to find these—just be alert and observant of your surroundings. Maybe it’s hidden in a salt shaker. Or maybe it’s disguised as a soda can. Or maybe....

What do the attributes of a personal traveler represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 08:18:21 PM
AttributeDescription
A trail-only personal traveler means you must find the owner while on the trail in order to nab the stamp.
A limited time traveler means you better get the stamp soon, because it won't be around much longer!
The brain icon represents a mental challenge which may require research or solving a tricky puzzle.
The impersonal traveler is much like the personal traveler in which it travels from place to place with a letterboxer, but it's often left unattended for other letterboxers to acquire such as at a campsite or on their vehicle.

What do the attributes on a postal represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 08:16:37 PM
AttributeDescription
If a postal weighs more than 13 ounces (the maximum weight for large first-class envelopes and parcels), the price of shipping goes up quite a bit—so use this option to let people knowthat it might cost a bit more to mail.

What do the attributes mean on an LTC?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 08:11:51 PM
AttributeDescription
The stamp used for the LTC has been previously used in some other box, and not necessarily another LTC.
You must solve some sort of puzzle or other challenge in order to earn this LTC.

What do the attributes for a traditional box represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 06:52:30 PM
AttributeDescription
A Word of Mouth (WOM) box. The clues are distributed somewhere other than online, such as via e-mail, postal mail, or delivered in person.
A snow friendly box is rather a squishy concept. Some people might consider a box that requires several miles of cross-country travel using snow shoes or skies as snow 'friendly,' while other may not. Other boxes might be quite findable if there's an inch or two of snow on the ground but may no longer be easily found if there's a foot or two of snow on the ground. In theory, though, a snow friendly box is one in which important landmarks in the clue would not be covered, nor will digging through layers of snow be required to find the box.
A pet friendly letterbox is located in an area that allows pets to roam, usually with a leash requirement.
This image marks letterboxes that require a compass in order to find. The lack of this picture means the clue doesn't require a compass OR that the creator of the letterbox did not specify a compass requirement. It's generally a good idea to always carry a compass in your letterboxing kit, though, so you'll always be prepared.
A bike friendly letterbox is located in an area where bicycles or mountain bikes are permitted and have plenty of room to roam. For instance, while it is legal to ride ones bicycle on busy city streets, it is not considered bike friendly if there are no designated bike lanes available for use near the letterbox. And while many trails may be accessible to mountain bike, it is not considered bike friendly if the trail is for hikers only.
An urban letterbox, as defined here, is located in an area where one is unlikely to experience “The Great Outdoors.” Like in a big city, such as New York city. A rest area in the middle of nowhere is an urban box. A large city park with trees and hiking trails is not an urban box. The 'setting' for the letterbox is urban, not necessarily the location, if that makes any sense.
The trail or path to the letterbox should be accessible by wheelchairs or strollers the entire way. However, the letterbox itself may not be reachable from a wheelchair or stroller, and those using them may need assistance from others to actually acquire the box. The letterbox may be planted too high or low for someone in a wheelchair to physically reach, or too far off from the main trail for a wheelchair, but as long as an assistant can retrieve the box and bring it back for the wheelchair-bound person, it's considered wheelchair accessible.
The finder will be expected to use their head on this one in order to decipher the clue. The code might be easy or hard—but it definitely won’t be straight-forward.
This letterbox requires payment of some sort of fee-probably a parking or entrance fee. The lack of this picture does not necessarily mean no fees are required. The creator may not have specified fees, or perhaps fees were added since the box was planted. It's always a good idea to carry a few extra dollars in case of an unexpected fee or two.
This letterbox is available only for a limited time. A limited time letterbox is either a box that is planted for only part of the year or a box that you intend to retire within the next three months. Letterboxes planted in regions that are covered in snow for nine months of the year or in stores that require a visit during store hours do not count as limited time boxes.
A box that requires some sort of special or unusual equipment like for scuba diving or rock climbing, or even something as simple as a ladder. A compass is not considered “special” equipment for letterboxers!
Those who plant letterboxes are able to point out their favorite plants by assigning them the Planter’s Choice Award. They might do this because they consider it one of their best boxes, or perhaps it has sentimental value. Whatever the reason, the planter wants you to notice this box.

What are the different types of letterboxes?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 04:04:02 PM
TypeDescription
Traditional: A 'traditional' box is the standard, run-of-the-mill letterbox with a rubber stamp, a logbook and requires clues in order to find it.
Hitchhiker: The original spinoff, hitchhikers have a rubber stamp and a logbook and travel from box to box, hitching rides between boxes from the letterboxers who find it. It is okay to leave a hitchhiker behind if you do not feel like carrying the hitchhiker to a different letterbox. The category has been extended to also include cooties and fleas (which can travel from person-to-person).
Postal: A postal is a rubber stamp and the logbook that's mailed from one letterboxer to another, usually through the USPS.
Personal Traveler: A stamp that a letterboxer carries that can be 'found'—usually by answering questions or doing something for that person. The clues will state what the requirements are to get the traveler.
LTC: Short for Letterboxer Trading Cards, an LTC is like a baseball card that can be swapped and traded. They are handmade by letterboxers and should include some sort of stamp in the image. A standard LTC has a fixed 2.5" x 3.5" dimensions, but a growing number of non-standard sizes and shapes are now being included in this category including inchies, quisps, postcards and bookmarks.
Event Box: A box whose sole purpose is to be present at an event or gathering for other people to stamp into. Typically, they're readily available on tabletops, in ice chests, and otherwise hanging around waiting for your observant eye to stumble onto them and usually don't require clues to find. Some event boxes might have clues. For example, if they're locked in a container and the clue is needed for the combination. (Not to be confused with a traditional box since the box itself isn't hidden and out of sight—it's just inaccessible until the combination is figured out.)
Other: For anything else that doesn't quite fit into any other category, it can be labeled as an “other” box. Usually it involves a rubber stamp, but in a context that none of the other terms conveys.
Reserved: Use this for boxes that have not yet been planted but are scheduled to be planted at some point in the future. Your box will be assigned a unique ID number and once the box has been planted, you can convert it into one of the other types of boxes. Only you will be able to see your reserved boxes.

What do the subtype icons on traditional boxes represent?

Last Updated: July 3, 2020 03:23:53 PM
SubtypeDescription
This letterbox is located indoors -- perfect for those cold, wet days when you really do not want to go outside.
A drive-by letterbox, as defined on this website, is a letterbox that requires perhaps 5 to 10 minutes to nab from the time you park your car. A drive-by letterbox will be hidden within eyesight of where one parks, or at least so close that if it were raining, the person would take the box to their car to stamp in.
A stroll is something that's less than a mile round-trip of walking, which would take most people less than 30 minutes to complete (find and return to their starting point) but still too far out to be considered a drive by.
A walk is something that requires 1 to 2 miles round-trip of walking/hiking, which would take most people between 30 to 60 minutes to complete.
A hike is a box that requires 2 to 4 miles round-trip of hiking, which would take most people between 1 to 2 hours to complete.
A trek is 4 to 8 miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people anywhere from 2 to 4 hours to complete.
A backpack is 8 to 15 miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people anywhere from 4 to 8 hours to complete.
A thru-hike requires 15 or more miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people a minimum of 8 hours to complete.

Note: Use a little common sense with these icons. A flat, paved, 1-mile trail would be a stroll. A rugged 1-mile trail that climbs 1,000 feet in elevation gain would be a walk. Even though both trails are one mile long, they would each fall into different categories since the difficulty level is very different. There are no hard or fast rules regarding this-just use a little common sense. A typical hiking trail that's two miles long would normally be a walk, but if the walk requires an extreme climb going up thousands of feet on a rarely maintained trail, mark it as a hike.

What do the subtypes in a traditional tracker represent?

Last Updated: June 29, 2020 05:59:14 PM
SubtypeDescription
There are two kinds of series of boxes—those that are physically placed near each other and most people would get in a single outing. Then there are these—a series of boxes related to each other but spread out across large distances that letterboxers might search for in any order and on different outings.
These are a series of boxes planted in close proximity to each other but are typically planted by lots of different people. It might make sense to get all of the boxes in one outing because they’re all in the same park. These trackers are created to help people sort through the confusion.

What do the attributes for LTC trackers mean?

Last Updated: June 29, 2020 05:57:13 PM
AttributeDescription
A swap with no restrictions regarding what sort of theme can be done, and most likely, will have a wide variety of unexpected topics!
The opposite of a potpouri—these swaps have rules that require you to create cards based on a specific theme. (e.g. favorite books, Harry Potter, Christmas, etc.)
You can reuse old LTCs you've created in the past.
These swaps are intended to put the trade into Letterboxer Trading Cards. If you have duplicate cards or want to trade cards you've collected from other people with other people, these are the swaps to look for!

What do the subtypes in an LTC tracker represent?

Last Updated: June 29, 2020 05:56:15 PM
SubtypeDescription
A singleton is a single LTC card that the tracker owner has available for distribution. Only the tracker's owner can add cards to the tracker.
An LTC swap is an efficient way to trade many cards with many people. Each participant in the tracker provides enough cards for everyone else in the tracker. The cards are usually sent to the tracker owner, who redistributes the cards and mails them back, making sure each person receives one of everyone else's card. Everyone in the tracker is expected to add their own LTC to the tracker.
No subtype is the wild, wild west of LTC trackers. It's not a singleton nor a swap, which are the most common organizations, but what it is is anyone's guess. There may be strange and unusual rules involved, so read the description of the tracker closely to see if it's something you want to get involved with. Anyone can add their own boxes to such a tracker.

What do the attributes stand for in a postal tracker?

Last Updated: June 29, 2020 05:54:52 PM
AttributeDescription
The postals in these trackers have a movie attached! Stamp into the box, then watch the movie!
The postals in these trackers have music attached. Stamp into the box while listing to the CD included with it!
Surely you know where this is going, right? There's a book to read with these postals. These trackers will probably move a lot slower than most if participants actually choose to read the included book.
These trackers include an altered book with the postal.
The postal in these trackers can be anything under the sun—whatever floats your boat, and who knows what others might do.
These trackers have a theme that everyone is expected to follow.
It's okay to reuse an old postal for these singles or rings.

What do the subtypes in a postal tracker represent?

Last Updated: June 29, 2020 05:52:41 PM
SubtypeDescription
A postal single is a single postal box that will be mailed to a group of people, one at a time. Only the owner of the tracker may add boxes—everyone else is just along for the ride.
A postal ring is a concept where each person who joins the ring contributes a postal to be mailed in a circular fashion. Person A mails a postal to Person B who mails to Person C, and eventually returns to them from Person Z. All members of a postal ring can add boxes, but they can only add postals that have them as the listed owner. The ring leader may add postals from anyone.
No subtype is the wild, wild west of postal trackers. It's not a single nor a ring, which are the most common organizations, but what it is is anyone's guess. Any participant can add postals they own, and the tracker's owner can add any postal they need to, much like a postal ring, but the organization of who mails what to whom may not follow conventional rules of rings.

What do the subtypes on a blog represent?

Last Updated: June 26, 2020 03:26:34 PM
Icon Description
The blog is a personal blog about all things letterboxing—finding them, planting them, solving or writing clues, attending events, carving stamps and whatever other letterboxing-related activities the owner wants to talk about.
A personal blog that’s usually about stuff that’s not related to letterboxing.
A blog that is by someone who, most likely, isn’t a letterboxer and has nothing to do with Atlas Quest, but that some people might be interested in following such as the blog for Cake Wrecks in which you can’t reasonably expect the actual owner of the blog to list themselves on Atlas Quest.

What do the attributes on trips represent?

Last Updated: June 23, 2020 11:23:50 PM
AttributeDescription
There are rest areas along the route. They may not necessarily be a lot of them, but there are at least a few along the way! The term 'rest area' can be used liberally for walking and bicycling routes. Perhaps a trail with shelters, or a convenience store along a bicycling route.
A historic route, typically famous (or infamous!) for one reason or another.
An actual hiking trail that hikers, pilgrims and other adventurers follow.

What do the subtypes on trips represent?

Last Updated: June 23, 2020 11:19:41 PM
AttributeDescription
The route represents a driving route. (The vast majority of routes are driving routes!)
The route represents a walking route. Obviously, this applies to long-distance trails such as the Appalachian Trail, but it can also represent walking routes through cities and involve road walks.
The route represents a bicycling route.

What do the attribute icons stand for in an event listing?

Last Updated: June 18, 2020 09:37:36 PM
AttributeDescription
The event is a potluck—bring some food, drinks or eating utensils and prepare to eat!
The venue allows letterboxing opportunities.
Pets are allowed at the event.
There is an entrance fee, parking fee, or some sort of expense associated with this event.
The date and time of the event is a mystery and must be figured out from clues.
The location of the event is a mystery and must be figured out from clues.
A raffle will be held at the event and there’s a good chance that the organizers of the event will need raffle prizes if you have anything available.

What do the subtype icons stand for in an event listing?

Last Updated: June 18, 2020 09:33:05 PM
The event will be held outdoors such as at a park, perhaps with a pavilion or other facilities available.
The event will be held indoors at a restaurant or similar location where food or drinks may be available for purchase.
A multi-day event where letterboxers are encouraged to spend the night together at a campground.
Events held at libraries, museums, schools and other places of learning.
Tag sale, birthdays, weddings, and other non-letterboxing events that letterboxers are welcome to attend.
The event will be held at a pub or other adult-only type of event.
An online event such as a Zoom meeting or often times a “call-to-action” such as Plant-a-Letterbox Day.
An unspecified subtype, or anything that does not fit the categories listed above.

What do the attribute icons on custom themes mean?

Last Updated: June 15, 2020 03:18:13 PM
AttributeDescription
This is a theme that generally only changes the colors and images, and is the kind that often changes from day-to-day on Atlas Quest. Examples include Christmas, Independence Day, Easter, etc.
A 'structural' theme changes where elements on the page are found or how they work. For instance, changing to the vertical menubar from the usual horizontal one found at the top of the page. This isn't used very often, but it's an option!
Most of these themes were created when a new feature was developed for Atlas Quest and one or more persons didn't like the change. By using the CSS "display:none", the features magically "disappear." Or, technically, they're just hidden from view. You can get rid of the emotion buttons on the message boards, you can get rid of the bottom menu bar, get rid of the AQ logo showing up everywhere, etc. By enabling this attribute, you're warning that functionality on Atlas Quest will be removed.
It's useful to format pages a little differently when they're being printed. Get rid of those unnecessary menubars and images. AQ applies a lot of these print-friendly features automatically, but you can re-enable them or hide information you aren't interested in, or change the font size or any other number of tweaks to make your printed pages more useful to you. This attribute lets people know that they may not see any visible changes if they use the theme, but it could affect pages printed from Atlas Quest.

What do the subtype icons on custom themes mean?

Last Updated: June 15, 2020 02:33:27 PM
SubtypeDescription
A holiday-themed event. Examples include Christmas, Valentine's Day, Veteran's Day, Columbus Day, etc. (But you don't have to limit yourself strictly to U.S. holidays.)
These are themes that celebrate a specific event in the past such as the anniversary of the first moon landing or the Golden Spike ceremony marking the completion of the first transcontinental railroad. These themes tend to be historic, but they don't have to be.
These themes commemorate regularly occurring events. Usually the events are annual such as the summer solstice or Talk Like a Pirate Day, but it can also include events that happen less often (e.g. the Olympics or the total solar eclipse) or more often (e.g. time changes or Friday the 13th themes).
This theme is based on a movie, TV show, music, stage, or other artistic endeavors.
Themes honoring a specific person.
Themes about a specific place or location.
Usability themes are designed to make someone's experience on Atlas Quest better or easier rather than cosmetic. All of the other subtypes are largely cosmetic in nature, but this category will hide features, move them around, or do whatever is necessary to make a better experience for others.

What are the differences between group types?

Last Updated: June 12, 2020 05:12:52 PM
TypeDescription
A public group is visible to everyone, and anyone can join or leave the group at any time.
Protected groups are hidden from everyone except members of it. Restrictions apply to the group, message boards on the group, as well as boxes, trackers and events restricted to the group. Any member of a protected group can invite non-members into the group.
A private group is almost identical to the protected group, except only group admins are able to invite new members to the group.

How do I narrow down the hundreds of boxes available?

Last Updated: June 10, 2020 09:47:38 PM
There are several ways to more effectively search through many box listings to find the ones that you would like the most:

  • Learn Atlas Quest's Advanced Search feature. This feature allows you to sort by hike length, by specific planters, only for hand carved, pet friendly, etc. If you change the search type to "area" you can even search for all the mysteries in a particular state. By changing the search type to "trip," that enables the trip planner search which allows you to search stretches along major highways and trails such as Interstates or the Appalachian Trail.
  • Look for boxes that others have rated highly with Blue Diamonds icons.
  • Look for boxes that planters have rated highly (of their own boxes) with Planter's Choice icons
  • Do a search on that city and when it pulls up all the listings, hit the "map results" button in the upper right hand corner. It will give you a map of the locations of the boxes that are listed IF the planter gave the address.
  • Contact a local boxer. Out of all the choices above, a local boxer is going to be the most knowledgeable. You can do this privately in an e-mail (you may notice a lot of boxes in an area planted by the same person) or publicly on the state message boards. Some areas also have developed clue guides with tips and boxes for specific frequently visited places in their area.

Why should I register?

Last Updated: May 19, 2020 09:21:11 PM
There’s the usual assortment of reasons for creating an account such as giving you the ability to list a letterbox, record a find, contacting other Atlas Quest members, participating on the message boards, and so forth.

The best reason to register, however, is that you can personalize much of this site especially for you. Even a simple search for letterboxes can be optimized when Atlas Quest knows who is doing the search. For instance, if you want to find a letterbox, you probably don’t need to see letterboxes you planted or ones you’ve already found, so Atlas Quest can remove those boxes from the search results. Members of Atlas Quest can also save their favorite searches instead of having to enter them in over and over again—and even be notified when a new letterbox is listed that matches their specific search!

Here are some other member-only privileges available:
  • Creating a personal profile, and be able to read other members’ profile
  • Being able to communicate with other Atlas Quest members
  • Saving your favorite message boards and your place in each of them
  • Create an online logbook of all your planted and found letterboxes
  • Save your preferences
  • Become part of the Atlas Quest community, one of the best online communities on the Internet

And registering is absolutely free. You can upgrade to a Premium Membership at a later time if you choose to, but almost everything on Atlas Quest is freely accessible to everyone.

If you're concerned about your privacy, rest assured that your privacy is very important here. There’s a detailed Privacy Policy if you want to learn more about what information may be tracked or how it may be used, but we will not sell or give out your personal information.

Register Now

What are keywords?

Last Updated: April 14, 2020 04:56:52 PM
Many times, people want to search for letterboxes that match specific criteria that Atlas Quest simply does not support. Usually, requests come in the form of attributes-such as, "Can we have a cemetery attribute" to search on? The answer, invariably, is always no. There are an infinite number of special-case attributes that could be created, and a list with hundreds of possible attributes isn't particularly helpful when most of them are of no interest to most people. Searching the clues for specific keywords, such as cemetery helps, but it's not perfect either. Many times, the word is spelled incorrectly or the clue uses common variations of the word (cemeteries, graveyard, etc.)

So support for keywords has been created. In a lot of ways, it's like a member-created attribute. People will be able to search for your keywords, and it won't get mixed up with false positives that a clue search might generate. Four keywords have already been defined:
Keyword Meaning
cemetery The letterbox is located in or near a cemetery.
historical A vague term that means something interesting happened where this letterbox was planted, not including the fact that a letterbox was hidden in this location.
nightbox A box that should be found at night. Not that it can be found at night, but rather that it's designed to be found at night. In daylight, the box may be difficult or impossible to find.
restarea The letterbox is located at a rest area, rest stop, truck stop, travel plaza, or whatever you want to call them along a major road. Ideal for nabbing while on a long drive to get out an stretch one's legs.

A valid keyword must have between 3 and 15 alphanumeric characters in it, and must not use any spaces since spaces are used to separate multiple keywords. (This is why the keywords reststop and nightbox are one word.) If certain keywords start becoming popularly used, they may be added as a designed pre-defined keyword in the future. Keywords are not case-sensitive, so feel free to capitalize keywords if that makes sense or helps readability.

A full list of all keywords used by everyone can be found at http://www.atlasquest.com/boxes/actions/viewkeywords.html.

The following keywords are suggested by boxers, with guidelines on how the keywords are intended to be used:
Keyword Meaning
airport The letterbox is within easy walking distance of an airport so that a private pilot may find it without having to secure ground transportation.
artworkThe letterbox is located at or near a work of art (sculpture, mural, etc.), planted to call attention to that work of art.
hauntedThe letterbox is located at or near a location reported as haunted or where some sort of paranormal occurrence is supposed to have happened.
horseA good place to bring a horse.
InterstateA quick find along an interstate or similar limited-access highway, either in a rest area or within a couple of blocks of an exit. If the stop takes longer than a potty break, it doesn't qualify!
library The letterbox is located in or around a library.
mountainbikeA designated ATB trail. Don't use this keyword for paved bike trails; mountain bikers who would enjoy paved trails can use the keyword "roadbike".
picnicA good place to stop for a picnic.
restaurantThe letterbox is located in or around a recommended restaurant.
roadBikeA good place to bring a road bicycle. This generally means there is a good place to ride a bike, and it's paved. It usually means a good place for rollerblades, too.
scenicrouteThe letterbox is located on or near a scenic highway.
touristThe letterbox is located at a place recommended for tourists to visit. The clues can be followed by anyone without local knowledge, although they may require some google research ahead of time. If they do require google research, they have the Mental Puzzle attribute as well.
trail namesJust type in the name of any hiking trail, such as appalachiantrail or pacificcresttrail. Remember to omit spaces. As a general guideline, the box doesn't have to be directly on the trail, but it should be close enough that a thru-hiker would want to hunt for it.
TransCanadaThe letterbox is located somewhere along the TransCanada Highway which stretches from St. John's Newfoundland to Victoria, BC, either in a rest area or within a couple of blocks of an exit. If the stop takes longer than a potty break, it doesn't qualify!
tributeA box that is planted in tribute to a person or group of people. This is not intended for tributes to historical personages — we can use historical for that—rather, for boxes like the ones planted for weddings, loved ones who have died, special teachers, etc.
wildlifeThe letterbox is in a location where animals may be observed.

One keyword that is remarkably popular but not suggested is "park." The problem with this keyword is that it tells you absolutely nothing. A city park host to a child's jungle gym, a national park, a car park, and a ball park are all very different places, but without a qualifier, it's meaningless, you have no idea what it means. In many instances, people are trying to use multi-word keywords such as "state park"-but AQ treats those as two distinct and separate keywords. "State" by itself is as useless as "park," but "statepark" might be a legitimately useful keyword, along with nationalpark, countypark, citypark, ballpark, etc.

The following multi-word keywords are commonly misused by boxers. If multi-word keywords are used, do not insert spaces or hyphenate words.
Incorrect format Correct keyword
parking lotparkinglot
picnic areasee picnic
ice cream or ice-creamicecream
city parkcitypark
boy scouts or girl scoutsboyscouts or girlscouts
kid-friendly, family-friendly, child-friendly Remove the hyphen; ie. kidfriendly
boat requiredboatrequired
open spaceopenspace
post officepostoffice
nature trailnaturetrail
I-70, I-94, etc.AQ treats these hyphenated interstates as two distinct keywords, "I" and "70"/"94", etc. Use the keyword interstate and list the Interstate number in the synopsis, if necessary.

How do I delete a find in my logbook?

Last Updated: April 5, 2020 07:46:10 AM
Go to your logbook and change to the page with your find by adjusting the Action and Box Type drop down menus as needed.

Then click the delete icon () and confirm your deletion.

If you want to delete someone else's find on one of your boxes, there is no way to do that except to ask the finder to remove their find.

Should I get permission before hiding a letterbox?

Last Updated: February 25, 2020 01:36:57 PM
If you want to be politically correct, yes. But if you ask, there's a real possibility they'll say no. The beauty in not asking is that they can't tell you no. And heaven forbid, if others have already placed letterboxes in the area and you let the owners of wherever the place may be know about letterboxing, they might not only tell you no, but they might even pull all the existing boxes! In any case, to be politically correct, you should ask permission. I know for a fact that most people do not, and what you do is ultimately up to you. Many places don't mind letterboxes, as long as they're placed where others can't harm the environment, which is a good thing to keep in mind while placing any letterbox.

Do not, however, ever plant letterboxes where they are known not to be allowed. If the land managers require permits or other hoops to jump through, follow their rules or find somewhere else to plant. We don't want to give letterboxing a bad name. And while asking for permission is not common, it's not okay to deliberately plant illegally either.

What do the icons next to a member's trailname mean?

Last Updated: January 23, 2020 09:10:56 AM
IconMeaning
View Profile Allows you to view this member's profile.
Contact Member Allows you to contact this member.
View Logbook Allows you to view this member's online logbook.
Add Note Read Note View and/or edit any notes you've taken about this member. If the notepad is blank, you haven't added any notes for this member yet. If the notepad has writing on it, then there are notes to read.
Planted 1 letterbox Planted 20-39 letterboxes Planted 300-399 letterboxes Trophies represent the number of planted letterboxes. Bronze trophies display your exact number of plants from 1 to 9. Silver trophies represent between 10 and 99 planted boxes (the number on the trophy is rounded down to the nearest 10), while gold trophies represent between 100 and 999 plants (the number on the trophy is rounded down to the nearest 100).
Found 1 letterbox Found 20-29 letterboxes Found 300-399 letterboxes Found 4,000-4,999 letterboxes Found 50,000-59,999 letterboxes Ribbons represent the number of found letterboxes. The ribbon gets an extra "point" at the bottom for every zero that follows the first digit. The ribbons are color-coded to the first digit roughly in a rainbow pattern from 1 to 9: 1 = red, 2 = orange, 3 = yellow, 4 = green, 5 = cyan, 6 = blue, 7 = magenta, 8 = purple and 9 = silver/grey.
1 message posted 20-29 messages posted 300-399 messages posted 4,000-4,999 messages posted 50,000-59,999 messages posted 600,000-699,999 message posted Stars represent the number of messages the member has posted to the Atlas Quest message boards. The number of stars or the size of the star increases as the count number increases. Each small star is worth one digit, and each big star is worth three digits. For example, two small stars = 10-99. One large star and one small star = 3 + 1 = 1,000-9,999. The biggest stars are color-coded to the first digit in roughly a rainbow pattern: 1 = red, 2 = orange, 3 = yellow, 4 = green, 5 = cyan, 6 = blue, 7 = magenta, 8 = purple and 9 = silver/grey. (If there are small and large stars, the color on the small star means nothing.)
New member since November 11, 2011 The stroller indicates that the user is new to Atlas Quest and will appear for the first two weeks from the time they signed up.
Profile updated November 11, 2011 Means that member has updated their profile within the last seven days. It may be nothing more exciting than adding a favorite food to the profile, or it may be they have filled out their interview!
Last Login: > 1 month Last Login: > 3 month Last Login: > 1 year The green, yellow and red battery indicators represent the last time the member logged into Atlas Quest. Green and still mostly full means they haven't logged in for at least 1 month. Yellow and half empty means that they haven't logged in for at least 1 quarter (3 months). Red and empty means that they haven't logged in for at least 1 full year.
Happy Anniversary! The picture of a cake means this user is celebrating an anniversary—the anniversary of the date they signed up on Atlas Quest!
Resting in Peace This is one icon you will never see next to your name, and you would probably prefer if others did not see it next to your name either since it means you have died. We won't delete your account if we find out about your death, but it lets other people know why you are no longer replying to AQ mail or maintaining your letterboxes. It also means there is a tribute section for you in the letterboxer obituaries.
Those with premium memberships at Atlas Quest get a feather in the cap to recognize their important contribution in helping to fund Atlas Quest. There are a few dozen hats available for premium members to choose, but you'll see a red or yellow feather in their hat regardless of the type they've selected. Additionally, as premium members, they get access to special features not accessible with a free membership. Learn more about the benefits of premium membership and how you can become one too!
Coffee Cup This icon is a premium member perk that indicates you've done an exchange with the person.

P-Count Icon Sequence

Bronze trophies (1-9 plants):
Silver trophies (10-99 plants):
Gold trophies (100-999 plants):
Winner's podium (1,000+ plants):

F-Count Icon Sequence

0-point ribbons (1-9 finds):
1-point ribbons (10-99 finds):
2-point ribbons (100-999 finds):
3-point ribbons (1,000-9,999 finds):
4-point ribbons (10,000-99,999 finds):

Message-Count Icon Sequence

1 small star (1-9 posts):
2 small stars (10-99 posts):
3 small stars (100-999 posts):
1 large star, 1 small star (1,000-9,999 posts):
1 large star, 2 small stars (10,000-99,999 posts):
1 large star, 3 small stars (100,000-999,999 posts):

Pennsylvania State Parks

Last Updated: December 27, 2019 01:26:37 PM
Pennsylvania does have a permit process for state parks and forests.

Geocaching in Pennsylvania State Parks and Forests
Guidelines for Placing Geocaches (and letterboxes)

It is the geocaching form, but it has a checkbox for letterboxes as well. Simply attach your clues and also a map marking where you plan to place your boxes and turn it into the park manager. It should take about a week or two for them to approve or deny the permit. If approved you will be given a sticker to place on the box to mark it has been permitted. The permit is good for three years.

How do you limit searches to "drive-by"?

Last Updated: December 3, 2019 08:32:54 AM
Use the Advanced Search page for all available search options including the ability to limit searches to drive-by boxes.

Is it possible to search for letterboxes along the Interstate highways?

Last Updated: November 20, 2019 10:35:57 PM
Use the trip search option on the Simple Searches page, or type in "ALONG I-5 FROM Sacramento, CA TO Portland, OR" (or whatever the case may be) as your search. If you type out the search manually, the keywords to use are "along" for the Interstate, "from" for which town to start the search, and "to" for which town to end the search.

Many interstate highways can be found by going to Toolbox, Trip Planner and then there is a list of routes, including lots of interstate highways.

What printer/toner combinations work with which transfer methods?

Last Updated: November 6, 2019 04:34:38 AM
Printer/CopierToner Cartridge/ManufacturerHeatAcetoneXyleneTransparency/Direct Transfer
HP Laserjet 4200 SeriesOfficeMax OM9881Great on PZ White and pink stuff, workable on PZ orange Mixed results on all tested blocks ?Can work with just rubbing, but better with heat
HP Laserjet 4 PlusHP 98A (92298A)??works great on the pink stuff?
HP Laserjet 5PHP 03A Toner Cartridge, HP C3903A?Produces very good image on Safety Kut and dollar store erasers (haven't tried other blocks)??
HP Laserjet 4300dtnHP 39Aworks on PZ Kut White and Orange, though heat setting should be lower with the orange???
Xerox Workcenter 5645Produces good images on pink stuff and PZ Kut white; faint but usable images on PZ Kut orange???
HP Laserjet 1022n?works fineyes??
Xerox XC356"old"Yes??Yes, when set on dark
ALPS Micro-Dry 1300 (no longer produced)ALPS dye sublimation ribbon cartridgesAbso-freakin-lutely amazing clarity on pink stuff; haven't tried anything else.n/an/an/a
Samsung ML-2010SamsungTransfer is always dark and crisp!???
HP Laserjet 2100HP?Works extremely well on white PZ Kut, and almost as well with orange PZ Kut??
HP Laserjet 2100M???worked very good on the pink stuff (clear, crisp transfer)?
HP Color Laserjet 4600dn *?Works very well on the pink stuff?worked okay on the pink stuff (transfer needs minor touchups before carving)?
HP Color LaserJet 1518 *HPworks on PZ Kut white and pink stuffworks on PZ Kut white??
HP Color LaserJet 2320 MFP *HPworks on PZ Kut white and pink stuffworks on PZ Kut white??
HP LaserJet Pro M28WHPIron-on??Good for SpeedyCarve pink slab
HP Color Laserjet Pro MFP M477fdnHP 410A Toner Cartridge Cyan, Yellow & Magenta, 3 Toner CartridgesWorks well on pink ? ? iron-on
Xerox Docucolor 250 (Kinkos)???Amazing on the orange, ok on pink?
Toshiba e-Studio 45Produces good images on pink stuff and PZ Kut white; faint but usable images on PZ Kut orange???
Canon MF5850 dnCanon cartridge 119 IITransfers very well onto the pink stuff?? iron on
Canon NP2020Transfers clear, dark image well on all materials???
Dell 1710nTransfers clearly on white and orange PZ Kut??
Brother HL-L2360DWBrother DR-630Clear, crisp iron/heat B/W transfers onto pink stuff and white PZ Kut; OZ dark, but not quite as crisp due to sheen???
Brother HL-2170WV4INK?Crisp transfer onto pink stuff; haven't tried others yet??

*Before printing on a color LaserJet, configure the printer driver to "Print in Grayscale" to ensure that the printer only prints with black toner. In the printer Properties, click on the "Color" tab to find the "Print in Grayscale" checkbox.

There has also been discussion about using solvent cocktails with both inkjet and toner based printers, with some success. The most common of these are various carburetor cleaners containing methanol, sometimes referred to as the "napalm" option. There has not been sufficient data submitted to suggest specific a specific combination to try or to avoid.

Is there an Android app for Atlas Quest?

Last Updated: October 23, 2019 08:30:07 AM
MichKathy and TrailMark created a Clue Tracker app for Android. It is similar to the iOS app; more information is available on the Clue Tracker website and on Google Play.

There is a Clue Tracker AQ Forum where you can ask questions or make suggestions.

There used to be Box Radar for Android, but that app has been discontinued and is no longer available.

Is there an iPhone app for AQ?

Last Updated: October 22, 2019 01:25:37 PM
Clue Tracker is a letterboxing app that is compatible with both Atlas Quest and LbNA. Clue Tracker was created by MichKathy and TrailMark (Pearl Crescent).

Features:
- Find nearby boxes based on the current location of your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad.
- Find boxes by location, name, or box ID.
- View detailed letterbox information including last found date and series details.
- Show letterboxes on a map and get directions to a box.
- Built-in compass display (device support required).
- Record finds.
- Save clues and other letterbox information for offline use.
- Organize saved letterboxes into your own lists and reorder boxes to create custom itineraries.
- Share a list of saved letterboxes with another Clue Tracker user (or transfer the list to another iOS device).
- Sort/filter search results and lists of saved letterboxes.
- Set or modify the location of a saved box.
- Add Word-Of-Mouth (WOM) letterboxes.
- Add your own photos to saved letterboxes and WOM boxes.
- Add personal notes.

Requirements:
- Compatible with iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Requires iOS 8 or later.
- Available on App Store.

There is a Clue Tracker AQ Forum where you can ask questions or make suggestions.

BoxFinder is another iPhone app for letterboxing, but was officially discontinued in July 2016.

What are preferences for the Stamp Exchange?

Last Updated: September 6, 2019 10:15:37 AM
Checking the Stamp Exchange every day for new listings can be exhausting, so you have the option of having Atlas Quest send you an AQ mail, once per day, with any new listings from the day before. You can opt to receive notifications of new stamp requests or stamp offers—or both. The notifications will usually go out around midnight, Pacific time, and include all new entries from the day.

How do I switch between metric and imperial measurement units?

Last Updated: September 6, 2019 10:15:23 AM
You can switch between metric and imperial (standard) measurement units in your Letterbox & Search Preferences.

Is it possible to change the theme displayed on Atlas Quest?

Last Updated: September 6, 2019 10:15:05 AM
The theme is often set to reflect an upcoming holiday or date of significance. The theme may change several times a month. If you would prefer to pick your own theme, you can change that from your Theme Preferences page. If you have manually changed the theme and you want to revert back to the automatically-changes-randomly default, you must return to your theme preferences and unselect it.

Members can also create their own themes to use and share with others. Ryan wrote a tutorial for creating websites that includes tips on how to create your own themes.

How do I change my trailname?

Last Updated: September 6, 2019 10:12:38 AM
You can change your trail name from the Account Info page, which can always be found under the My Page menubar option. All plants, exchanges, and finds will automatically work with the new name, as if the old name never existed. Your old trail name will be unavailable for other members to use for one month to give people a chance to learn about your name change.

Please note: You must be logged into your current account in order to change your trailname on the Account Info page. If you are not logged in, you will be asked to log in. Log into your current account to change your trail name rather than register a new account.

National Park Service (NPS)

Last Updated: August 31, 2019 11:05:53 PM
Up until October 2007, the answer was generally no. But the NPS has apparently softened their stance. See their guidelines on "GPS activities":

https://www.nps.gov/policy/GPS_recreation_guidance.pdf

Yes, letterboxing is addressed in the policy.

The NPS controls not only national parks, but also national monuments, national battlefields, national seashores and national cemeteries, the Blue Ridge Parkway, Paramount Ranch, and quite a bit of other land. You can locate land managed by the NPS here.

Yes, they do occasionally check LbNA and Atlas Quest for rogue letterboxers. If you want your letterboxes to live long and happy lives, do not plant in any land under the jurisdiction without approval.

Some people assume that national forests are part of the National Park Service. This is not the case. They are two completely independent bureaucracies, and there are no known policies against letterboxing in national forests. For more information on distinguishing between the different agencies see How can I find out what agency manages the park and if they permit letterboxing?

How do I send pictures through AQ mail?

Last Updated: August 13, 2019 06:23:15 PM
You can't. You can link to images, however, including images that have been added to the AQ Photo Gallery.

How do I add AQ anniversary widget to My Page?

Last Updated: August 13, 2019 06:06:20 PM
The AQ anniversaries are part of the This Day in History widget. To install:

  • Click the Add Widgets button in the upper right corner of My Page.
  • Scroll down to This Day In History and click the Add Widget button below it
  • This should take you to your My Page, where you should find that the widget has been installed

What do the icons stand for in a traditional letterbox?

Last Updated: June 4, 2019 02:17:30 PM

Stamp Types

AttributeDescription
The creator promises you'll find a genuine, 100% hand-carved stamp in the letterbox and not a store-bought or custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a unique, custom-made stamp.
The letterbox contains a store-bought stamp rather than a hand-carved or custom-made stamp.

Attributes

AttributeDescription
The creator does not specify the location of the nearest city for this letterbox. They may have specified the state or country of its location, but you're expected to discover the actual starting point for the hunt yourself. From a technical standpoint, a location is considered a mystery box if the location has no name, address, and city. If the location spans less than one mile, it is not a mystery. And if a location is "somewhere within a city," the owner of the box can specify if it's a mystery location or not. And finally, just because you solve a mystery and add a custom location, the letterbox is still considered a mystery box-adding a specific custom location will not remove this icon.
This picture represents a bonus box, where the clue for the box will be found (usually) in a pre-existing nearby letterbox. Premium Member Perk!
A Word of Mouth (WOM) box. The clues are distributed somewhere other than online, such as via e-mail, postal mail, or delivered in person. Premium Member Perk!
Premium members might see this icon, which means you've done an exchange with the owner of this letterbox. Premium Member Perk!
An urban letterbox, as defined here, is located in an area where one is unlikely to experience "The Great Outdoors". Like in a big city, such as New York city. A rest area in the middle of nowhere is an urban box. A large city park with trees and hiking trails is not an urban box. The 'setting' for the letterbox is urban, not necessarily the location, if that makes any sense.
A snow friendly box is rather a squishy concept. Some people might consider a box that requires several miles of cross-country travel using snow shoes or skies as snow 'friendly,' while other may not. Other boxes might be quite findable if there's an inch or two of snow on the ground but may no longer be easily found if there's a foot or two of snow on the ground. In theory, though, a snow friendly box is one in which important landmarks in the clue would not be covered, nor will digging through layers of snow be required to find the box.
A pet friendly letterbox is located in an area that allows pets to roam, usually with a leash requirement.
This letterbox is available only for a limited time. A limited time letterbox is either a box that is planted for only part of the year or a box that you intend to retire within the next three months. Letterboxes planted in regions that are covered in snow for nine months of the year or in stores that require a visit during store hours do not count as limited time boxes.
A bike friendly letterbox is located in an area where bicycles or mountain bikes are permitted and have plenty of room to roam. For instance, while it is legal to ride ones bicycle on busy city streets, it is not considered bike friendly if there are no designated bike lanes available for use near the letterbox. And while many trails may be accessible to mountain bike, it is not considered bike friendly if the trail is for hikers only.
The trail or path to the letterbox should be accessible by wheelchairs or strollers the entire way. However, the letterbox itself may not be reachable from a wheelchair or stroller, and those using them may need assistance from others to actually acquire the box. The letterbox may be planted too high or low for someone in a wheelchair to physically reach, or too far off from the main trail for a wheelchair, but as long as an assistant can retrieve the box and bring it back for the wheelchair-bound person, it's considered wheelchair accessible.
You'll be expected to use your head on this one in order to decipher the clue. The code might be easy or hard-this image promises nothing on that count-the only thing it does promise is that the clue won't be straight-forward as most.
A box that requires some sort of special or unusual equipment like for scuba diving or rock climbing, or even something as simple as a ladder. A compass is not considered "special" equipment for letterboxers! Premium Member Perk!
This image marks letterboxes that require a compass in order to find. The lack of this picture means the clue doesn't require a compass OR that the creator of the letterbox did not specify a compass requirement. It's generally a good idea to always carry a compass in your letterboxing kit, though, so you'll always be prepared.
Premium members can search for boxes that do not have the compass attribute. Premium Member Perk!
This letterbox requires payment of some sort of fee-probably a parking or entrance fee-in order to find. The lack of this picture does not necessarily mean no fees are required. The creator may not have specified fees, or perhaps fees were added since the box was planted. It's always a good idea to carry a few extra dollars in case of an unexpected fee or two.
Premium members can search for boxes that do not have the fee-area icon. Premium Member Perk!
Those who plant letterboxes are able to point out their favorite plants by assigning them the Planter's Choice Award. They might do this because they consider it one of their best boxes, or perhaps it has sentimental value. Whatever the reason, the planter wants you to notice this box. Premium Member Perk!
The blue diamond marks letterboxes that are highly recommended by other letterboxers. If your time is limited, you might want to focus on finding a Blue Diamond letterbox. Premium Member Perk!
Each week, the highest rated box on Atlas Quest is designated the Box of the Week. Use this to search for boxes that have reached such lofty heights. Premium Member Perk!
Some people like to find boxes that are 'historic,' and using this option in one's search can help narrow down the possibilities. A historic box, in this case, is any letterbox that was planted at least ten years ago and has been listed on Atlas Quest for at least five years. Premium Member Perk!
Some letterboxers want to find that elusive box few people ever find or even search for. Searching for 'rare finds,' in this case, will return all boxes that have not had a recorded find for at least one full year. Premium Member Perk!

Premium Member Perk! = Search options that are only available to premium members.

Hike Types

AttributeDescription
This letterbox is located indoors -- perfect for those cold, wet days when you really do not want to go outside.
A drive-by letterbox, as defined on this website, is a letterbox that requires perhaps 5 to 10 minutes to nab from the time you park your car. A drive-by letterbox will be hidden within eyesight of where one parks, or at least so close that if it were raining, the person would take the box to their car to stamp in.
A stroll is something that's less than a mile round-trip of walking, which would take most people less than 30 minutes to complete (find and return to their starting point) but still too far out to be considered a drive by.
A walk is something that requires 1 to 2 miles round-trip of walking/hiking, which would take most people between 30 to 60 minutes to complete.
A hike is a box that requires 2 to 4 miles round-trip of hiking, which would take most people between 1 to 2 hours to complete.
A trek is 4 to 8 miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people anywhere from 2 to 4 hours to complete.
A backpack is 8 to 15 miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people anywhere from 4 to 8 hours to complete.
A thru-hike requires 15 or more miles round-trip of hiking, and will typically take most people a minimum of 8 hours to complete.

Note: Use a little common sense with these icons. A flat, paved, 1-mile trail would be a stroll. A rugged 1-mile trail that climbs 1,000 feet in elevation gain would be a walk. Even though both trails are one mile long, they would each fall into different categories since the difficulty level is very different. There are no hard or fast rules regarding this-just use a little common sense. A typical hiking trail that's two miles long would normally be a walk, but if the walk requires an extreme climb going up thousands of feet on a rarely maintained trail, mark it as a hike.

Emoticons

AttributeDescription
This is a happy letterbox—there are no reported issues with the box and no known repairs are needed.
This is a sad letterbox—it needs some help. Maybe there's a torn ziploc bag or maybe there's been a catastrophic box failure and the logbook is unusable or stamp severely damaged. If you wish to help, by all means, please do!

If you print the QR code on your clues when you go to log your find where do you scan the code?

Last Updated: May 21, 2019 09:45:58 AM
Nobody has answered this question yet! Be the first!

How do I package a set of LTCs for a tracker?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 03:04:49 PM
Most hosts at this time prefer a taped, reusable flat mailer, because it keeps postage more consistent, and is easier to sort and send.

Here is a link to Chedva's bubble mailer tutorial. You can tape a flat mailer just like a bubble mailer:

http://chedvasltccarvingsspoilers.blogspot.com/p/bubble-envelopes.html?m=1

Small trackers may use self-addressed stamped envelopes because for just a few cards, it is less postage, but this is less common, so please read each tracker and if you aren't sure, ask the host.

-Write your trail name on the outside of the mailer.
-Dogear tape for quick removal
-Include return postage.

How do I list a LTC on AtlasQuest?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 08:22:19 AM
LTCs are listed on Atlas Quest just as letterboxes are: Add Letterbox.

  1. Select the LTC option then click "Add Box"
  2. Complete the "Basic" information: Some crafters include all or part of the tracker name in the title separated by a colon (tracker: title). Synopsis is a great place to give credit to the original artist of the image, if applicable.
  3. Complete the Attributes form
  4. Complete the Series Info: The carver is the individual who made the LTC. Give credit to the stamp carver on the Basic page or in the clue. No matter how many stamps are included on a single LTC, regardless of its size, it is only ONE LTC. Do NOT list each stamp separately.
  5. Complete the Clue: this is a good place to include info about how the card was made, why it was made, credit to other artists and more.
  6. Restrictions allow you to limit access to viewing/logging the card listing on AtlasQuest to individuals or groups.
  7. Review the information then click save. AtlasQuest provides a "Box" number for the listing. Record this number on the back of each LTC. Each LTC receives a unique number for tracking.
  8. Editing is still possible by clicking the "Edit box"

What information goes on the back of an LTC?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 08:00:54 AM
For Good practice, include on the LTC (usually on the back):
  • Trail name or signature stamp
  • AQ box #

Other useful information to consider including:
  • Title of card
  • Tracker
  • Number of cards; such as 1 of 20 or 1/20
  • Date (tracker date or card completion date)
  • Info on techniques
  • Credit to any original artwork borrowed
  • Carver's name if the carved stamp was different than the LTC artist
  • Any other useful or interesting info

Additional info might also be included in the clue for the listing on Atlas Quest.

What is an LTC?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 07:57:45 AM
LTCs or Letterboxer Trading Cards are a variation of ATCs or Artist Trading Cards--small pieces of artwork (2 ½ ” x 3 ½”) created for the purpose of trading with other artists. The distinguishing feature of an LTC is that it must include one or more hand-carved and hand-stamped images, and usually as part of the design, not just the signature stamp on the back to identify the artist.

LTCs usually begin with a base made of archival (acid-free) card stock or similar heavyweight material, measuring 2 ½ " by 3 ½ ". Any art/craft medium or combination of media is encouraged to showcase the stamped image as long as the materials are secured to the card, toxic-free and legal to mail since swaps are hosted via the USPS. The back of each card is stamped with the letterboxer’s trail stamp, date created and its AQ box #.

LTCs are created for swapping with other letterboxers but is not limited to that as LTCs have also been used in ATC swaps. LTCs are a fun way to do more with a hand-carved stamp before that stamp is planted as a traditional.

History: LTCs were suggested on the Atlas Quest discussion boards as early as 2007. The name—letterbox trading card-- was first suggested by Shadohart, and the first LTC swap was hosted by Mama Cache in March, 2008.

To receive a LTC welcome packet which includes a set of example LTCs to start your collection, contact Linden Leaf.

The most current LTC activity is happening now at:
LTC Trades and Trackers
Letterbox Trading Cards.
LTC Fanatics.

Blogs about LTCS and stamp carving:

When starting a tracker, who can I contact for advice?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 07:53:19 AM
Some experienced previous tracker leaders to contact include:
Linden Leaf
mudflinginfools
aMAZEing adventure frog
GypsyFiddler
dancingpecan
jlsd0218

How do I host an LTC tracker?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 07:47:56 AM
Learn more about trackers and about hosting trackers at: https://www.atlasquest.com/about/wiki/browse.php?catId=43

How do I trade an LTC?

Last Updated: March 27, 2019 07:45:23 AM

Trades

  • List your card on Atlas Quest. Requests will start to come in through AQ mail.
  • For faster trading, announce available card(s) on Atlas Quest's LTC: Trades and Trackers Board
  • Consider requesting trades. Do a search for active LTCs. When you find one that interests you, contact the owner and request a trade.
  • After a trade has been agreed upon, exchange addresses and simply address an envelope to the LTCer in question and send them your card. Most people put the LTCs in a blank note card or piece of card stock to protect it in the mail

Active Lists Automated

When you start creating art for group swaps you may find yourself making a few extra... what to do with the extras? Trade them as individuals! And the easiest way to get a list out of the cards you have available for trade is to give'em a link... a link that automatically keeps track of your active LTCs.

  • From the letterbox dropdown menu, click Advanced Search
  • Under search type on the right is a box that starts out saying "Location Search". Click the arrow and under bold "Other Searches", click Stamp Collections
  • Then click the arrow again to click on LTC
  • "Sort by" select "name"
  • In "sub type" click the "not specified"
  • Leave "attributes" blank
  • Under "box status" click "active"
  • Leave all the other fields blank except "letterbox author". Put your name here.
  • Click the "search" button at the bottom of the page to run the search.
  • Once the new page opens up, click the "save search" button at the bottom of the page. It will ask for a title... I included my trailname in my search title so that whoever I send it to will have it there for easy reference... if it's in a thousand places, it's a thousand times easier to find! ;)
  • Then when you want to let someone know your active cards for a trade outside of a swap ring, in the letterbox dropdown menu, click on "My Searches" near the bottom, find it in the list and click on "search". Once you get to your active LTCs page, verify that it all looks right, highlight the page address in your navigation bar (top of the screen), copy it and paste it into the post or e-mail to whomever you want to trade with.

Swaps

Once you've signed up for a swap, the host will provide guidelines, like the number of cards you need to make, orientation requirements, special instructions and the due date. Make your cards, list them on AQ, add them to the tracker and mail them by the "send by" date, or make sure that you send with enough time for them to be received by the swap host by the "receive by" date. Bubble mailers will protect your cards and you can use them almost indefinitely when you prepare them according to the following instructions.

Mail the cards to the host and you're done. Preparing a mailer. While you are waiting, join another swap, make more cards for trading, or go boxing!

When the swapped set arrives, be sure to comment on the cards when logging your "finds."