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Read Thread: SLQ Transfer Method?

Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886668 by FloridaFour
Feb 1, 2015 12:48am
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Hmm I'll try to be quicker with the Xylene and see if that works. If not, guess I gotta buy some Acetone.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886667 by The Lost Boys
Feb 1, 2015 4:01am
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What is the best method of transferring to SLQ?

I have only used the parchment paper transfer on SLQ and it has worked great for me. I do dab the transferred image with mustard Stazon and let it age for four or five days before beginning the carve. If you do it sooner, the Stazon seems to grab the cutting tool and can cause slips or hangups.

I would love to use the acetone process but have been unable to find a printer that works for it.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886667 by The Lost Boys
Feb 1, 2015 4:35am
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I use the parchment paper method successfully -- have to transfer some today!
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886685 by paper trail
Feb 1, 2015 6:04am
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I just remembered that I have a roll of parchment paper in the closet & haven't used it. Can you use that on an inkjet printer?
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886689 by Topcollector
Feb 1, 2015 6:08am
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InkJet is excellent with parchment paper. It is the only transfer method i have gotten to work consistently with inkjet.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886689 by Topcollector
Feb 1, 2015 6:55am
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I just remembered that I have a roll of parchment paper in the closet & haven't used it. Can you use that on an inkjet printer?

Yes. You print the image as usual, then cover it w/ a square of parchment paper and re-print. I have also used erasable bond, if you can find it, which I liked alot -- no taping necessary. You just move future images around on the paper so it prints in a new spot.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886689 by Topcollector
Feb 1, 2015 11:00am
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Parchment is the method of choice with an inkjet, but you must remember to reduce the saturation of the print by about 50% or so. If you print full darkness, it'll just make a mess. Too much ink.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886670 by Sharkboy and Lavagirl
Feb 1, 2015 12:06pm
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I'm having trouble getting the image on the SLQ with the acetone. Basically the image isn't sticking to the block. Or it's spotty. It's the same acetone I use to transfer with the pink stuff, but it's just not working. Is there a trick I'm missing?
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886741 by Only Dreaming
Feb 1, 2015 12:41pm
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Its probably something to do with your toner, and not the acetone. I use 100% acetone. Canon toner didn't work for me with acetone, I switched to Linkyo.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886741 by Only Dreaming
Feb 1, 2015 9:55pm
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When it comes to acetone transfers, people on here are always describing methods that I abandoned long ago as unworkable. Here's what works: Cut out a small piece of cotton cloth, like from an old T-shirt. Lay the rubber down face-up, and lay the printed image face-down on it and line it up properly -- having enough bright light to be able to see the rubber and the image through the paper helps. Soak the cloth in acetone and squeeze it out so it's wet but not dripping. Lay the wet cloth on top of the paper and press it with a cold iron or something else flat-bottomed. Press for perhaps five seconds. When done correctly, the wet cloth will release just the right amount of acetone uniformly across the surface of the paper -- as opposed to wiping with a cotton ball or other methods. Peel the cloth and paper off and the transfer should have transferred well.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886790 by Kirbert
Feb 2, 2015 1:15pm
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Thanks. I'll try that next time. Seems easier than rubbing with a cotton ball.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886728 by Kirbert
Feb 11, 2015 7:46pm
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I am a bit confused as to how the parchment paper method is done. Can someone explain it more clearly for me? Thanks
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887800 by Sahalie
Feb 11, 2015 8:39pm
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Works with inkjet printer. Print your image on regular paper. Tape a piece of parchment paper on top of that spot. Put it back into printer and reprint. If the image is very dark, use 50% saturation, or it will be too inky and smear.

As soon as it prints onto parchment, take the parchment and flip it ink side down onto the rubber. Sometimes all you have to do is lightly press with your hand and it will transfer. Other times, you may need to rub over it with a spoon, handle of scissors or other blunt object. It depends on the ink and the type of rubber. Let the image dry on the rubber. Use a contrasting ink, such as yellow Staz On ink, on the rubber, so when you carve, you can see better where you carved.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887804 by FloridaFour
Feb 12, 2015 2:28pm
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This sounds like what I have been doing with transparency sheets, except you can print directly onto the transparency and no taping is required. I am curious as to why you first need to print it on regular paper. Is that so you'll know where to tape the parchment? Does parchment work better than a transparency? (I have a number of these). Maybe parchment would work better than the slick surface of a transparency? Occasionally it will splotch. If there are any thick spots this may happen, and I have to let it dry (blow on it) for about 30 seconds before placing it on the stamp material. Changing the saturation may be a good thing. How do you change the saturation?
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #886670 by Sharkboy and Lavagirl
Feb 12, 2015 2:38pm
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<quote>You need the right kind of printer or an older photocopier (i use the photocopier at my grocery store).</quote>

I have tried everywhere within driving distance that I can think of, and no place uses the old type copier anymore it seems. I envy all of you who have found one. Many years ago both my workplace and local library did, but both have been replaced with newer machines that don't work. I miss them.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887908 by Sahalie
Feb 12, 2015 3:30pm
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i like parchment better than transparencies because it doesn't seem to just sit on the surface as much, less smearage. You don't have to print the image on plain paper first, but if you do you a. know where and how much area to cover with parchment, and b. have an image as reference as you are carving.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887908 by Sahalie
Feb 12, 2015 11:43pm
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I am curious as to why you first need to print it on regular paper.

I don't do that; I just cut out a piece of parchment and run it through the printer. It's iffy, though, whether parchment will run through a printer properly since it's so slippery. The fact that it's usually OK in my particular printer may be because I'm lucky. Others may have to tape it down to a sheet of regular paper so it goes through the printer OK. And printing it first on the paper just makes it clear where to tape it down.

Parchment can be cleaned off after a transfer and can generally be used for a couple of transfers before you have to pitch it or cut that section of parchment away and move on to a clean area. So perhaps some people are doing the printing and taping to minimize the waste of parchment.

BTW, I personally have stopped using parchment because I've discovered mylar. It works largely the same as parchment except A) it goes through a printer just fine; B) it cleans up perfectly, you can use the same piece for hundreds of transfers; and C) the transferred image is a bit clearer because mylar has no grain or fibrousness to it. The challenge would be to find a sheet of mylar; it used to be available at drafting supply places, but nobody drafts any more.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887965 by Kirbert
Feb 13, 2015 4:44am
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Do you use 4 Mil or some other thickness? Do you print on the matte side or smooth side?
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #887976 by Sahalie
Feb 13, 2015 10:06am
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Heck, I don't even know the mil of this stuff. I've had it in the closet for 20+ years and had forgotten about it until I was digging around in there one day. Mine happens to be matte on both sides, but if you have the stuff that's matte only on one side obviously you must use the matte side. My piece has a slight curvature to it, so I choose to print on the convex side because it's a bit easier to do the transfer that way, but I've used both sides with success. You've gotta dial the saturation waaaay back for sure, because too much ink will make a blotchy mess on mylar big time.
Re: SLQ Transfer Method?
Board: Tools of the Trade
Reply to: #888032 by Kirbert
Feb 13, 2015 11:25am
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Thanks for all the helpful information.