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Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #77994 by LUNA crew
Mar 13, 2007 7:44am
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As a teacher and a parent...here are some thoughts, as I've considered doing the same thing for my kids at school as well.

1. 5th grade kids are going to want to carve...even if it's just erasers and pinched pencil ends. And, this way, they can have a 'siggy stamp' to exchange with each other in their class. It can be simple designs, intials, hearts, flower, bug, skateboard, whatever. Check this out here:

http://www.letterboxing.org/kids/kidstamp.htm

2. Do some history about the area before you go in, so you'll have a way to 'guide' the thought process.

3. If you're planning on planting NEAR the school, it might be a good idea to let the principal, etc, know. In these times, a strange person wandering around in the woods outside a school can be a cause for alarm.

4. You might actually pre-arrange with the teacher to have some mini-type stamps hidden around the school, provide clues and break the kids into teams to find them.

5. If you do #4, the kids will need logbooks. however, most schools have comb binders, so this MIGHT be an option with a ream of copy paper, a paper cutter and the comb binder.

The reason I make these suggestions is that 5th grade kids, on the whole, are going to want to be personally invested and involved. If they are, you'll find you and they have a better time with it.

Good Luck!

JPMcD
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #77997 by Jenni P McD
Mar 13, 2007 8:06am
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I totally agree with Jenni's post, also speaking as a teacher and a mother of a 5th grader. They are certainly old enough to carve their own stamps and will be much more engaged if you can get them hands-on in their involvement. And if I can tag onto Jenni P McD's post...

6. Bring some simple clip art options for a pencil transfer to their stamps that they can carve. Not all of them will want to draw their own picture... and in fact, those that don't like to draw (or feel like they "can't draw") will sit forever and claim they "don't know what to draw." Plus, figuring out what kinds of images make good carvings and which don't can be difficult.

fotosearch.com has a ton of black and white images that will make good stamps.

Carianna of the GG
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #78000 by Gryffindors
Mar 13, 2007 8:11am
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Not all of them will want to draw their own picture... and in fact, those that don't like to draw (or feel like they "can't draw") will sit forever and claim they "don't know what to draw."

GOod point. As an art teacher, I tend to be prepared for this, and don't accept these types of excuses. However, being prepared with quick artwork is a good substitute if you're not the 'art teacher' type. :-)
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #78001 by Jenni P McD
Mar 13, 2007 8:33am
Board
Quote As an art teacher, I tend to be prepared for this


Ahh... well, no fair then! I love to carve, but if I had to draw my own images first, my plants would be, well, zero! (Not that 16 is such a big number, but it's nothing to sneeze at, either!)

Art is certainly not my strong point. But ask me about children's literature and I'll talk your ear off! Everyone has their strengths, eh?

Carianna of the GG
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #77994 by LUNA crew
Mar 13, 2007 8:55am
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One way to sell it to the teacher is to point out how letterboxing can be used in the curriculum.
Maybe after the stamp is placed have all the kids write their own clues. Poetry, letter, narrative...these are all writing styles the kids are familiar with through Language Arts. Then the kids can vote on which one they like the best; that can be the one that is published.
Using coordinates and compass readings ties into math objectives as well as map reading skills.
Finding out about the history of the area, can suppliment the Social Studies curriculum, as well as help the kids possibly find a theme/stamp image for the letterbox. Or they could use the school's mascot, if there is one.
Letting them design their own signature stamps can be related to their art curriculm. And getting some exercise outside on the trails can be counted as Physical Education.
And if you talk about the plants and animals they may encounter on the trail, you've covered Science!
Did I leave anything out?
I have had to sell "letterboxing" to my son's Outdoor Education program at school. It wasn't that hard when I showed the teachers how much of the curriculum could be included.
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #78009 by Mn8X
Mar 13, 2007 9:05am
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They can't all plant.

Soooo...


Good ole cooperative learning!

One on carving the box stamp. One on preparing the container. Two on making the logbook. The entire team writes/revises the clues.

Five teams in a class gives you one set of clues to give each team each day that week. Shhhhh, no tattling about the box you found on Monday when team #5 hasn't been there yet!
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #77994 by LUNA crew
Mar 14, 2007 8:58am
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I hid a box in the "outdoor classroom" (a prairie area) at my kids' school (with permission from principal) and I carved something related to the school mascot for the stamp and named the box after the mascot.
Re: presenting boxing to 5th graders
Board: Kid Shenanigans
Reply to: #78256 by MO UR4Me
Mar 15, 2007 5:33am
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Quote I hid a box in the "outdoor classroom" (a prairie area) at my kids' school (with permission from principal

did you post it on AQ or LBNA or is it WOM for the clues?
six stars
*not going to find your box, but wanting to know for my box-planting purposes!*