Skip to Content
Register · Login
About Theme

A Letterboxing Community

Search Edit Search

Read Thread: Thin lines?

Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801946 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 8:22am
Board
If you don't want that Staedtler 1V, I got first dibs on it.

No, really the Staedtler is your best friend. I only use gouges and just can't get comfortable with a knife. Maybe I need a tutor.

Yeah, practice, practice, practice.

AB
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801946 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 8:27am
Board
If you don't have some sort of magnifier, get one. It really makes a difference.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801952 by Lovebirds-NC
Sep 2, 2013 9:01am
Board
Yes, lots of practice but what transfer method do you use? I find that a good transfer encourages me to achieve those fine lines. I use Speedball and for me, it's all in controlling the depth. Also, do you use a magnifier? I like your sig stamp:-)

I trace my images with a soft leaded pencil or charcoal pencil, then rub them onto the carving surface. Thank you. My sig stamp is store bought (oh, the horrors!) but I got it well before I even considered carving. I like it a lot. :)

If you don't want that Staedtler 1V, I got first dibs on it.

MINE. :)

I'm not even quite sure what people mean by knife carving. So I guess that makes me a gouge carver. I'm not against learning, though.

If you don't have some sort of magnifier, get one. It really makes a difference

A sewing light and magnifier might be a good idea. I never really thought of that, even though I use a headlamp for light when I carve.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801968 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 9:09am
Board
On OZ cut, you can carve really really shallow, and the details will still show up. Just for practice, try transferring something using acetone, or heat from a print out. It took me several tries on OZ before I liked it, but once I learned to carve really shallow I loved it. Also Versafine ink gives nice detail for me. I'm using up some crumbly pink stuff today, and I can't get nearly the detail of OZ. If you try to carve too deep on OZ, your lines will end up very straight, and lose fluidity, or curves.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801968 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 9:09am
Board
If you're still tracing to transfer, you'll never get to the real detailed carving. You need a way to get the ink of the printed image directly on the rubber. You'll get several suggestions, from printing on parchment paper, to acetone or ironing.

K
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801970 by Kelsung
Sep 2, 2013 9:19am
Board
If you're still tracing to transfer, you'll never get to the real detailed carving

exactly true. I always say your carve can only be as good as your transfer. Hang on a second, think I bookmarked an iron /acetone friendly printer friendly list

http://www.atlasquest.com/about/wiki/browse.html?gCatId=33#q270
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801946 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 9:21am
Board
I found using a lighted magnifying glass has helped me with getting thinner lines..
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801976 by turkey feathers
Sep 2, 2013 9:29am
Board
I think it depends on the style of carves. Mine are pretty detailed, and they are mostly pencil transferred images of my own drawings...... BUT, I just use the pencil marks as a guide. But if I need to make exact lines, then yes, I draw in ink, upload and print and transfer. On the occasion that I do use a computer image, then yes, I use acetone.

Pencil transfer, no it is not an exact replicate of me, but pretty detailed.

http://www.atlasquest.com/gallery/viewphoto.html?gPhotoId=120362
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801970 by Kelsung
Sep 2, 2013 9:38am
Board
If you're still tracing to transfer, you'll never get to the real detailed carving.

I agree with you. But I think there are people who are artistic and are adept at improvising, whereas I am a needs-to-cut-along-the-dotted-lines kind of person. More skill than artistry. Jealous of those types.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801968 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 9:41am
Board
Here is a thread about the transfer method (Erasable Bond paper) I use. Before that though, I did pencil transfers with a very fine lead mechanical pencil and also got great results. Go get a magnifier! I got mine at Michaels with a coupon and it was very reasonable. Our first sig stamp was store bought too and we still use it sometimes. Yours looks hand carved!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801970 by Kelsung
Sep 2, 2013 11:15am
Board
If you're still tracing to transfer, you'll never get to the real detailed carving.

Crap. That must be my problem!! I can't seem to give up the improvising!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802003 by The Wolf Family
Sep 2, 2013 11:51am
Board
This thread relates to something I need advice on. I recently started carving using pink stuff and Speedball gouges. My challenge seems to be getting the lines deep enough the first time so that I don't have to go back over them because when I go back over them they get raggedy. It doesn't seem to matter if I'm doing letters or details, a second pass turns it into a mess. I actually prefer using the #2 for carving because it seems to respond more smoothly for me but I'm concerned I'll gouge too deeply/widely which is why I feel I need to make a second pass.

For the second pass I've tried both the #2 and the #1 but have the same icky results. I really think I can't follow the same line twice! I hope this makes sense and FWIW I am not someone who normally does much drawing though I do other visual arts such as paper folding so feel that my dexterity is adequate but visual/spatial skills may not be as well developed. I do wear reading glasses. I have not tried additional magnification. Do I just need more practice?

Thanks for listening
CTEE
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802017 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 12:11pm
Board
Here are some great carving tips from nosox that I had bookmarked. The first one is so true - make your first cut your best cut!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802017 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 12:12pm
Board
I think this is a material defect of the pink stuff. I only noticed this problem after the formula was changed and shortly thereafter other folks on the boards starting complaining about it. Up until that time, my only experience had been with pink, so it really was obvious. The OZ takes more physical effort, but will hold your lines better, at least in my experience.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802025 by Wry Me
Sep 2, 2013 12:35pm
Board
The OZ takes more physical effort, but will hold your lines better, at least in my experience.

I agree with this - the pink, even the good pink, is too soft to go back over a thin edge. OZ is just enough firmer that I can shave really tiny edges from an already carved area. Of course, this assumes your gouges are nice and sharp!!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802027 by Wise Wanderer
Sep 2, 2013 12:54pm
Board
Of course, this assumes your gouges are nice and sharp!!

I agree with you but mine haven't gotten enough use yet to be dulled...LOL

CTEE
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802030 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 2:20pm
Board
Oz is definitely easier to go back and change lines. I do it constantly. And I agree with you, on the pink, it is hard. Sometimes I have to use a craft knife or the edge of my biggest gouge, to shave already carved lines. I use OZ for the carves I really care about these details on. It is especially wonderful for lettering.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802047 by FloridaFour
Sep 2, 2013 2:55pm
Board
Sometimes I have to use a craft knife or the edge of my biggest gouge, to shave already carved lines.

So is an exacto knife the same as a craft knife? I recently watched a knife carver and tried the technique of cutting along the edge of a line and then making an angled cut next to it to remove the material but I really can't see the first line I cut...it just seems to seal back up....which made it impossible for me to cut an angled line next to it. At least with a gouge I can see the line I've made I just sometimes want it to be deeper than my first pass made it.

I have used an exacto to smooth out the gouge lines from the large area around an image and that's mostly a shaving motion almost parallel to the surface of the stamp.

Maybe I really should try the OZ. I was given small scraps of white Speedy Carve recently but haven't had time to try it....how does that compare to the pink or the OZ?

Peace
CTEE
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802050 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 3:53pm
Board
white Speedy Carve recently but haven't had time to try it....how does that compare to the pink or the OZ?

I wouldn't call white Speedy Carve quite craptastic, but it is pretty funky (kinda crumbly), and you will have more trouble getting the fine lines you are after with it than either good pink or OZ. I am happy with Speedy Carve's longevity, though. I used it for my first Tahoe series, and it has held up fairly well for 9 years of pretty good use. I just had to glue foam to the back of one of the stamps that was cracking in half, but with the foam on the back the stamped impression doesn't even show the crack.

I really can't see the first line I cut...it just seems to seal back up...

I don't have any experience using the yellow StazOn ink, but many experienced carvers will advise you to apply it to your stamp material after you transfer your image because it makes it much easier to see where you have carved (removed material will be pink or white, without yellow coating; unremoved material will have a yellow tinge). I don't know it if helps with a single knife line. A magnifier will help with everything.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802066 by artTrekker
Sep 2, 2013 4:02pm
Board
I wouldn't call white Speedy Carve quite craptastic, but it is pretty funky (kinda crumbly), and you will have more trouble getting the fine lines you are after with it than either good pink or OZ.

Good to know. Might make good practice pieces though.

..yellow StazOn ink, but many experienced carvers will advise you to apply it to your stamp material after you transfer your image because it makes it much easier to see where you have carved (removed material will be pink or white, without yellow coating; unremoved material will have a yellow tinge).

I have heard of doing that for transfers from parchment paper to keep them from smearing but never thought of it for pencil transfers. It does make sense that the contrasting colors would be a visual advantage. Thanks for the suggestion.
A magnifier will help with everything.

Even with my athlete's foot and ring around the collar? ;) Actually...not sure I want to look at those with a magnifier!

Peace
CTEE
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802070 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 4:47pm
Board
Even with my athlete's foot and ring around the collar? ;) Actually...not sure I want to look at those with a magnifier!

umm, yeah, ew. Everything you need to see.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802003 by The Wolf Family
Sep 2, 2013 9:08pm
Board
Perhaps that's what's been putting Cyclonic off about your boxes!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802030 by CTEagleEye
Sep 2, 2013 9:10pm
Board
Ha! You wouldn't believe the condition of some of the brand new gouges I have seen!
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #801946 by DM Scuba Brat
Sep 2, 2013 9:30pm
Board
When I first saw this I thought you were looking for tips on how to twerk like Miley Cyrus! I then realized that she had blurred lines.... You were asking about thin lines. Wrong kind of lines.... My bad ;)
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802066 by artTrekker
Sep 2, 2013 9:52pm
Board
I am happy with Speedy Carve's longevity, though. I used it for my first Tahoe series, and it has held up fairly well for 9 years of pretty good use.

THAT was Speedy Carve?!! I'll say it held up, and with amazing detail and thin lines. Stunning carves.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802050 by CTEagleEye
Sep 3, 2013 5:51am
Board
I recently watched a knife carver and tried the technique of cutting along the edge of a line and then making an angled cut next to it to remove the material but I really can't see the first line I cut...it just seems to seal back up....which made it impossible for me to cut an angled line next to it.

Hmmm...I think i resemble that remark.

If you carefully bend the stamp after the first cut, you can see the first line. This was easily done on the old pink, but the new stuff may break if you overdo it.

Also, wear 3X reading glasses even if they make you look like a dork :)
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802050 by CTEagleEye
Sep 3, 2013 6:50am
Board
I was given small scraps of white Speedy Carve recently but haven't had time to try it....how does that compare to the pink or the OZ?

Ah, the white "stuff"...we bought that once because it was cheaper. In this case, we got what we paid for. Super crumbly and difficult to make intricate cuts on. One thing that we found did help when finer carving had to happen was putting it in the freezer for a few minutes to firm it up. It helped stop the crumble, somewhat.

L&S
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802050 by CTEagleEye
Sep 3, 2013 9:07am
Board
tried the technique of cutting along the edge of a line and then making an angled cut next to it to remove the material but I really can't see the first line I cut...it just seems to seal back up..

The secret there is to be carving orange PZ Kut. The translucent orange color lights up like a light bulb when it's sliced. The good pink stuff does, too, to a much smaller but still workable extent.

..which made it impossible for me to cut an angled line next to it.

Well, as a knife carver of considerable experience, allow me to confess that I don't do that. I make the slice along the edge of the image, and then I come back with a needle or gouge to remove the rubber. The gouge will readily follow the existing slice and dig pieces out with ease. The needle is used only to remove pieces that are too narrow for a gouge to fit in there.
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802291 by Kirbert
Sep 3, 2013 11:11am
Board
The secret there is to be carving orange PZ Kut.

Kirbert, why even bring it up? We may be only dreaming.

"Jam yesterday and jam tomorrow, but never jam today."
Re: Thin lines?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #802331 by artTrekker
Sep 3, 2013 11:58am
Board
Without dreaming, I'd be tempted to give up this pastime for good. Carving OZ is certainly not my idea of fun. If something better doesn't come along soon, I'm probably going to have to take up knitting or bridge.