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Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Jan 16, 2007 5:27am
Board
Having grown up in the country and been forced once to collect the leaves from all the local trees, I have some inkling deep in my long-term memory on tree types. This is much easier in the summer of course when there are leaves to check. In the winter with trees devoid of leaves it is much harder.

I have seen multiple tree names in clues: sycamore, cypress, walnut, oak, maple etc. Unless you are in a marked arboreteum this could be challenging for some.

Has anyone had any trouble with this issue when our on the trail?
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 16, 2007 5:44am
Board
most definately! i'm in the eastern part of my state & the trees in the mtns i had never seen before. so i'm askin the locals, what is that?!:)
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 16, 2007 6:03am
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I think it's all part of the game...if I don't know a tree listed in a clue I look it up before hand....clues aren't supposed to be easy (necessarily) and I think "easy" is defined differently by each of us. I have some clues in boxes I planted that I consider easy but have had others tell me they can't figure it out....all part of the "game"!!

dewdrop
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63626 by Dewdrop
Jan 16, 2007 6:27am
Board
When I was young, we always had a little set uf books about the size on a pack of index cards per book. They were all different: mammals, birds, insects, sea animals and of course Trees. Anyway, they got misplaced and lost over time, but luckily I came across a full set last summer at a yardsale. I got them for future school projects for the kids. Now, with my new LB hobby, I have a real reason to use the tree book myself.
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63630 by sweet n sour
Jan 16, 2007 6:38am
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Who publishes this book? I would be interested in getting one. There are a very few trees I know by sight. I could really use some arboreal help!
Six Stars
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63638 by six stars
Jan 16, 2007 6:42am
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I will have to check on that after I get home from work (*bad girl, get back to work*).

I hope I don't forget!!
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 16, 2007 7:12am
Board
We have a tree field guide and always check ones that we might not be familiar with before we leave. The trouble I have run into is more along the lines of misnamed trees in the clues. It has never stopped us from finding a box, but a couple of times the trees mentioned were not the species they were supposed to be! Like listed as an Aspen, but really a Cottonwood, that sort of thing.
But hey, that's better than some of the other tree clues!
Stacy
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63643 by Nitrocat
Jan 16, 2007 7:30am
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I had the same experience last week. the clue read " find the poplar tree" and there was no poplar in sight. did find the box at another tree though. phew!!
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63643 by Nitrocat
Jan 16, 2007 7:49am
Board
One of my Girl Scouts planted a box at her school for a classroom project. She received an e-mail from someone who was looking for the box. They told her that because they were unable to identify the tree types (remember, this is winter in New England, which makes it all the more difficult), all her clues should be changed to using compass readings so that they could find the box easier. I convinced my scout that other people will be able to find her box without changing the clues and if this person would have read the clues and seen that every clue relies on tree identification, maybe they shouldn't have been looking for this particular box if they can't identify trees. The reason all the clues use tree identification is that it a project for an Agricultural High School. This is at the top of the clues.

Quote
Summary: The National FFA Organization is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. In this class we learn the different skills that it takes to be in this service career field. We also learn about the different skills needed to succeed in these careers while also learning the difference between a state and national park.


I agree with dewdrop
Quote I think it's all part of the game...if I don't know a tree listed in a clue I look it up before hand....clues aren't supposed to be easy (necessarily) and I think "easy" is defined differently by each of us. I have some clues in boxes I planted that I consider easy but have had others tell me they can't figure it out....all part of the "game"!!


That's pretty much what I told my scout.

FG
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 16, 2007 9:13am
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Quote Tree types in clues


where? I wanna see video of this typing tree. what's his trailname? Fangorn?

night writer, with no apologies for the puns
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63685 by Romana
Jan 16, 2007 9:49am
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Quote what's his name? Fangorn?


It'd be a dang long letter if it was Fangorn! First 10 pages just to say "Dear Sir".
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63643 by Nitrocat
Jan 16, 2007 10:17am
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Quote The trouble I have run into is more along the lines of misnamed trees in the clues.


Quote they were unable to identify the tree types (remember, this is winter in New England, which makes it all the more difficult),


I had one box that the clues said to look for the triangle of three oaks... we looked & looked...(a bit confused, I must say,) and almost gave up until this one person found it much to our surprise! When we asked where it was she pointed to a triangle of 2 pines & an oak...she admitted she didn't know the the difference! I guess it shows that sometimes too much knowledge can be a detriment also....LOL!
~C~
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63719 by Chunna
Jan 16, 2007 1:52pm
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I LOVE using tree types in clues - even in winter (evil laugh!). And I have to confess, I had a rather intensive forestry class in college and had to learn types, latin name, bark, tree shape (w/o leaves). Muuwaahahahaha!!

But, I do keep it simple for people who are not forest experts....... :-)) And, there is a very nice series of laminated card ID guides - closed they are about the size of a folded road map, and they unfold to reveal the info. Very easy to carry in a backpack, if tree names are necessary. I can look up the publisher if needed - they are available at most major bookstore chains (B&N, Books a Million, etc) and outdoor stores. We have some for insects and butterflies.

Mama Fox
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63807 by The Little Foxes
Jan 16, 2007 4:14pm
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Quote I LOVE using tree types in clues - even in winter (evil laugh!).


Letterboxing taught me to recognize trees, first by their leaves and then during winter by their trunks. I now find that is the easiest way to tell them apart no matter what the season - by their trunks :-)

YT
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63875 by The Yorkshire Tortoise
Jan 16, 2007 4:35pm
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Okay, so I have 3 books...

One is the Peterson Field Guide, one is the National Audobon Society and the one in the series of 9 books is the Golden Nature Book (made by golden press)

Believe me when I say they are all fairly outdated, (copyright early 70's) but really, how much have trees changed since then.
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63807 by The Little Foxes
Jan 16, 2007 8:51pm
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That looks like a very evil laugh. Now I know how to spell that one. Will have to add to my short-cuts on word.
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63696 by Big Ox and the Herd
Jan 17, 2007 11:32am
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Quote
It'd be a dang long letter if it was Fangorn! First 10 pages just to say "Dear Sir".

HA! Snort!
*rolls off chair*
then the next 700 to say a "letterbox is by my roots"

kwm
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 17, 2007 3:06pm
Board
Yes, a few times. Here in Washington, it's mostly been the birch/aspen confusion when I've come across a tree identity problem. (Hmm, are there any tree psychologists out there?) I just end up figuring, "Well, okay, I've tried all of the birches, let's start looking at aspens..."

I figure that if I'm going to include a tree type in a clue, I'll try to make darned sure beforehand that I know what kind of tree I'm talking about.

Pied Piper
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 17, 2007 3:16pm
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I am in tree sales for a living. This can even be challenging for some that do this for a living such as myself. I have been dying to do in depth clues tied to tree identification but I am afraid that it won't appeal to the general letterboxing public.

The other concern is regional common names. The same plant may be known by 5 or 6 names depending on what region you are in.
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #64230 by The Mudmonkeys
Jan 18, 2007 10:17am
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Quote The other concern is regional common names. The same plant may be known by 5 or 6 names depending on what region you are in.


Maybe when we mention trees in our clues, we should give the Latin name. :-)

Pied Piper
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #64467 by Pied Piper
Jan 18, 2007 2:37pm
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I sooooo want to do that!
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63643 by Nitrocat
Jan 18, 2007 4:18pm
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I would have to agree here. Miss labled tree names. Which didn't "effect" me, but caused my DH to spend more time then needed looking for a particular box! Should have taken 5-10 mintues and took over 30! :o) Coarse this was his first solor trip out too with the kids...that could be thye major reason!
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #63618 by IrishRef
Jan 18, 2007 4:36pm
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boy have we had trouble. When the leaves have fallen, unless it's an evergreen, how do you tell? And sometimes they get the tree name wrong. I try to avoid tree names, and use unusual shapes for trees instead.
Chickadee (of JR&C)
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #64587 by Jolly Roger and Chickadee
Jan 18, 2007 4:44pm
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I have really liked some of the creatice ways that lb'ers have used to describe trees in our travels (ie: Kneeling tree, Tree with Devil horns, etc.) It can be way to hard to identify a tree unless your pro. Even a tree that is used in a landscape can take on a different appearance in a woodland setting.
Re: Tree types in clues
Board: Yakking It Up
Reply to: #64589 by The Mudmonkeys
Jan 25, 2007 8:56am
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or the tree that "looks like a butterfly"???? 45 minutes of looking for this species made me realize i need more imagination.

deniserows
and probably needs bifocals