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Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979345 by Grrly Girl
Sep 10, 2019 2:28pm
Thread Board
Apparently you don't need to do anything but spend a little money to get a badge.

I totally get where the sarcasm comes from here and in the other messages re: these Etsy boxes! However, for context we should consider a few things about the Brownie Scout program.

1) Brownies are girls aged 7-9.
2) The boxes are most likely being bought by their Troop leaders and then being hidden as a Troop activity.
3) Unlike Boy Scout (ages 11+) merit badges which are individualized and are single badges for a topic, many GS badges are designed to be done as group activities as part of a larger arc of similarly themed badges that spans their GS career. Later in this particular arc they will do a Geocache badge, then others as they progress through the age groups (Brownies, Juniors, Cadette, Senior). The Letterbox badge is for the youngest girls so the requirements are the simplest. Whatever they do as Cadettes and Seniors in this themed badge arc is probably more complex and puts more emphasis on the individual girl. I don't know what other badges there are for big girls after Geocaching.

My expertise here is that I came to letterboxing through my daughter's Brownie Troop. She lost interest but I kept it up. What her Troop leader did was had the girls make "stamps" by using foam stickers on little wood blocks, then had them go find a box that she had hidden just for them - nothing permanent. That was it, as far as I could tell.

Secondly, a colleague and I have been working on developing an Archaeology-themed set of badges for GS. The BS have an Archaeology badge but the GS do not and I have girls who come to our archaeology summer program and are disappointed not to be able to earn a badge. However, I have been somewhat annoyed with the '4-badge/tiered by age/must fit into a theme/best if done as a Troop (so the girls in last year's camp did not give my prototype badge a try)' system they have in Girl Scouts. We are still working on it, but GS is very slow to respond even though they say they are interested in having us develop this badge series. This is all off-topic, but you can see where my info comes from. I definitely agree with other posters that the I individual councils/troops do what they want! And the requirements for Brownies are very simplistic. But certainly they should discuss Code of Conduct as a troop.
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979355 by detective
Sep 10, 2019 3:13pm
Thread Board
A lot of what takes place in a Brownie troop is very dependent on the troop leaders as well as the councils.

Our troop is large so we split into two groups and hid temporary boxes for each other. It worked well except that my group made a mistake on our left vs right and the other half of our troop needed help finding the box. Ooops.

We started with the foam stamps too, but the girls weren't satisfied. We ended up carving real stamps. It was quite impressive. My girls are awesome.

As for the code of conduct, I did give them an age appropriate description of the rules. I stressed the leave no trace, stealth and hiding things well. We also mentioned doing maintenance on boxes we find as we box. Not sure I mentioned maintenance on our own boxes. That's a tough thing for 7 year olds. I did give the parents a hand out though. I'm pretty positive no one read it.

We're all volunteers. Stuff happens. None of us are experts on everything our girls decide to persue.
Re: Town Pounds
Board: State: Massachusetts
Reply to: #979353 by uneksia
Sep 10, 2019 4:16pm
Thread Board
Thank you for this information. Unfortunately there are no NH historical Markers but I will go looking for the town pound and school.
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979355 by detective
Sep 10, 2019 4:47pm
Thread Board
I would rather find a juvenile depiction of a cat done by a Brownie than a professionally done letterbox purchased for the sole purpose of learning about letterboxing and getting a badge.

When I hunt for a Brownie letterbox I expect the quality to be commensurate with the age of the troop, not a purchased product.

Seven to nine year old Scouts should be capable of producing the stamp and logbook and understand the difference.

My absolutely favorite stamp is from an exchange with a four year old carver.
I had to print his trail name so he could copy it into my logbook.
I have his first carve's first impression of his stamp.
I don't know which of us was happier with the exchange.
Re: Hike Type Reason?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979344 by MissMoon
Sep 10, 2019 4:55pm
Thread Board
I have done that in the past when we were planning ahead. Sometimes we do not plan ahead. We just go. 🙂
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979356 by LROSEM
Sep 10, 2019 6:14pm
Thread Board
I was originally under the impression that the main goal of the badge was planting a box -- choosing the spot, writing the clue, etc. So, really, is the fact that you bought the things in four different places so much better? At least this way, there is a hand-carved stamp, right?

But really, the badge is solving clues, finding and stamping into boxes, writing clues, making the box, and hiding it, so, yeah, the kit isn't really all that kosher. In fact, they are bypassing half the process. Even if the leaders are buying and planting them so they can have practice finding them, it doesn't save them all that much time, expense and effort, because they still have to teach them how to make their own box for the rest of the badge. Why not just have all those seeking the badge hide for each other? What am I missing?

I was noodling around and thought this site was excellent! And it's very thorough.

I remember thinking I wished the badge was for older girls. Then we stood a fighting chance of having them transition to real boxers. Newbies!
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979358 by Grrly Girl
Sep 10, 2019 6:15pm
Thread Board
When I hunt for a Brownie letterbox I expect the quality to be commensurate with the age of the troop, not a purchased product.

That's what makes them so darn cute! That and the million teeny stamps without trail names taking up your entire logbook! They forget the part about having a trail name, I just realized.
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979346 by Mizscarlet
Sep 10, 2019 6:20pm
Thread Board
Is the person selling this a letterboxer? Is seems to go against the spirit of both scouting and Letterboxing.

This is the part where we all pretend we didn't just look up their trailname. Or fart in the elevator.
Re: Town Pounds
Board: State: Massachusetts
Reply to: #979357 by NatureMamaB6
Sep 10, 2019 7:18pm
Thread Board
the franklin pierce homestead is close by and it does have a historical marker, also the stone arch bridge which is near the downtown area.
smile
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979355 by detective
Sep 11, 2019 5:26am
Thread Board
My expertise here is that I came to letterboxing through my daughter's Brownie Troop. She lost interest but I kept it up.

This is our experience as well. My daughter at the time was ambitious and she earned all the badges. We looked at the letterboxing badge, at first I put it off because it looked "weird", but once I started reading the requirements, it sounded fun, and we got started right away.
We later helped lead the troop to make foam stamps, decipher clues, and exchange. They didn't get to hide a box because it started raining that year and canceled our hike to do this, and the leader never rescheduled. Oh well.

Whatever they do as Cadettes and Seniors in this themed badge arc is probably more complex and puts more emphasis on the individual girl. I don't know what other badges there are for big girls after Geocaching.

These badges are in the Adventure line, so after the juniors have Geocashing, the Cadettes have Night Owl - which is sharing constellation stores, talking to someone who works at night, among other night related activites. We went to a observatory and looked through telescopes. The Seniors have traveler - which is trip planning I believe.

So, the letterboxing badge is designed to get the girls engaged with being outside and planning. It's more artistic and "craft" related to engage the younger girls.
It would be great if the GS badges had helpful tips for the leaders, and they might now in the volunteer tool kit. I don't have access to it since I'm not a leader to see if the letterboxing badge meeting plans might mention maintance and ettiquette.
But most of the GS badges are upto the leaders to deliver and interpret. There is usually not a lot of help from councils and it's more of a "do your best to get the spirit of the badge" and have fun.
On this day in 1977...
Board: History is Alive
Sep 11, 2019 6:49am
Board
at Baumetes Prison in Marseille, France, Hamida Djandoubi, a Tunisian immigrant convicted of murder, becomes the last person executed by guillotine.

Red John
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979362 by Wry Me
Sep 11, 2019 7:45am
Thread Board
Or fart in the elevator.

"One must never own up to a fart in public. That is the unwritten law, the single most stringent protocol of American etiquette. Farts come from no one and nowhere; they are anonymous emanations that belong to the group as a whole, and even when every person in the room can point to the culprit, the only sane course of action is denial."
~The Brooklyn Follies, by Paul Auster
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979368 by MissMoon
Sep 11, 2019 9:52am
Thread Board
I prefer to turn and look in the direction of the accused.
It couldn't possibly be me.
I cannot turn and look at myself.
Impossible.
Accordingly, it was someone else.
Re: Code of conduct
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979286 by Mizscarlet
Sep 11, 2019 11:03am
Thread Board
We should all remember this is a fun hobby with preferred expectations. Everyone interprets "the rules" differently. It is wonderful the hobby continues to gain new letterboxers. We must remember they are new, often excited, and happy to share their new journey.
If a letterbox is being displayed without permission it is best to privately suggest they contact the owner, review the code of conduct, and maybe consider a vague post in place of photos. Some don't understand that others don't want the image spoiled or shared. Educating new boxers politely and privately is better than embarrassing them publicly.
As for creating and selling letterboxes...this is fabulous as well. Many donate and sell their carves to others. The particular boxer "unnamed" is very ethical and dedicated to this hobby. She is a positive influence.
I can't speak for practices of Girl Scouts as i have never been involved. But with anything else...it goes back to the Leader and their guidance.
We need to be a welcoming, accepting community if we wish to encourage and grow this hobby.
Re: Standing ovation for Musicals-Stage and Screen Event
Board: State: Illinois
Reply to: #979310 by carry on grandma
Sep 11, 2019 11:18am
Thread Board
What a fun day at Rush Creek in Harvard, IL. Thank you for the wonderful day! It was great to see friends and make new letterboxing friends. My little Mack Mermaid and I can't wait for the next event.
In-between Los Angeles & San Diego
Board: State: California
Sep 11, 2019 12:21pm
Board
Hello All,

The Mystery Host HHH has been relocated, so close to an offramp, and such easy access!

https://www.atlasquest.com/showinfo.php?boxId=274524

Great off ramp to get food, a park for the kids to run off energy and to take a break from the traffic. Why not squeeze in a little boxing while you're going up or down the San Diego freeway?

Oh, did I mention that the Innkeeper/Host stamp will change every few months, so you can re-visit again and again? You can ignore the HHs if you want!

Hope you'll visit as you're driving by, or if you're down here in October for the upcoming "Great Outdoors Letterboxing Event"!

https://www.atlasquest.com/showinfo.php?eventId=4095
East Hampton Airline Trail Sunday September 22 anyone?
Board: State: Connecticut
Sep 11, 2019 12:30pm
Board
Since Bungalow Boxer moved to Florida now I need to find a new hiking buddy for when visiting in Connecticut!
There is a series on the Airline Trail in East Hampton that I'd like to do in addition to some maintenance on our own boxes.
Sunday September 22. Meet either after breakfast or after lunch?
Would anyone care to join me on this hike?
Three FLAmigos
Re: How do you add a box ahead of planting?
Board: Stupider Questions About Letterboxing
Reply to: #974879 by Janila
Sep 11, 2019 2:51pm
Thread Board
OK, so just to be clear, I can activate a reserved box today and, during the activation process, make the plant date 9/30/19 and it won't show up in searches or in notifications until 9/30?

I just want to make SURE, as I have five newbies helping me plant a number of related boxes on the same trail. We want them to be released on the same day, but in the future because people are going on vacation at different times and need to set it all up in advance. The boxes are already out in their hiding spots, so it is just a matter of making them available at the same time.

Thanks!
Re: How do you add a box ahead of planting?
Board: Stupider Questions About Letterboxing
Reply to: #979376 by MO UR4Me
Sep 11, 2019 3:03pm
Thread Board
I can activate a reserved box today and, during the activation process, make the plant date 9/30/19 and it won't show up in searches or in notifications until 9/30?

If they are set up in advance as reserved boxes, you will still need to actually activate them on the chosen date and change the plant date on the Basic Details page. You cannot enter a date for the reserved box to all of a sudden become active in the future. If you don't change that date when activating the box, it will reflect the date that you set up the reserved box.

When you change the date to the date that you are activating them, they will appear in the Newest Boxes listing.
Re: How do you add a box ahead of planting?
Board: Stupider Questions About Letterboxing
Reply to: #979376 by MO UR4Me
Sep 11, 2019 4:30pm
Thread Board
I can activate a reserved box today and, during the activation process, make the plant date 9/30/19 and it won't show up in searches or in notifications until 9/30?

No, if you activate them today, they will be listed for everyone to see immediately--and AQ won't let you postdate a plant into the future. (Well, it'll allow one day in the "future" due to timezone issues, but not three weeks into the future.)

Activate the listings the day you want them to show up in AQ searches. By default, the plant date will be the date you activated them, but you can edit the plant date to be at any time in the past once it's activated.

-- Ryan
Re: Code of conduct
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979370 by GypsyLadybug
Sep 11, 2019 6:03pm
Thread Board
Yes, above all we need to be kind and welcoming. We might disagree about the details but we should try and remember we were all newbies once.
Re: Hocking Hills
Board: State: Michigan
Reply to: #979247 by Perfect Pair
Sep 11, 2019 6:44pm
Thread Board
Thank you everyone! We appreciate the tips!!
Re: Hocking Hills
Board: State: Michigan
Reply to: #979393 by Perfect Pair
Sep 11, 2019 6:59pm
Thread Board
Have such a good time.
Metro Parent
Board: State: Michigan
Sep 11, 2019 7:16pm
Thread Board
I just stumbled across this article online from March...just wondering if anyone else had seen it? it lists a few letterboxes from some familiar names :)

https://www.metroparent.com/daily/family-fun/family-activities/letterboxing-fun-for-families-in-southeast-michigan/
Re: Metro Parent
Board: State: Michigan
Reply to: #979395 by Perfect Pair
Sep 11, 2019 7:25pm
Thread Board
That is a great article.
100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Sep 12, 2019 7:17am
Thread Board
100 years ago today was the 4th and last day of a strike by the Boston Police officers. The largely Irish-American police force had seen its wages lag badly during the war. Efforts were made to organize in order to gain not only higher pay, but shorter hours and better working conditions. Police Commissioner Edwin U. Curtis refused to sanction a police union and suspended the leaders from the force in August 1919.

On September 9, more than 1,100 officers went out on strike, which removed three-fourths of the force from the city’s streets. In some areas, rabble-rousers looted and rioted. On the following day, Mayor Andrew J. Peters summoned local militia units, which managed to restore order. In anticipation of the strike, all of Boston's newspapers called it "Bolshevistic,"[#] and pleaded with the police to reconsider while predicting dire consequences. This hurt the officers deeply as most of them had fought in World War One, which had ended only 10 months earlier.

Police officers had an extensive list of grievances. Officially they worked ten-hour shifts, but typically recorded weekly totals between 75 and 90 hours, with no overtime pay. They were not paid for time spent on court appearances. They complained about having to share beds and the lack of sanitation, baths, and toilets at many of the 19 station houses where they were required to live. Their pay was $0.25 /hour, considerably less that the average Bostonian civil servant's. According to the US Census, average wages in America at the time were $1.25 per hour.

They also objected to being required to perform such tasks as "delivering unpaid tax bills, surveying rooming houses, taking the census, or watching the polls at elections" and checking the backgrounds of prospective jurors as well as serving as "errand boys" for their officers.

In the 4 days of the strike, 9 people were killed, 8 by the State Guard, who had virtually no experience in crowd control.

Ultimately all of the striking officers were fired, nearly 1200 in all. The replacement officers hired in the wake of the strike received higher salaries and more vacation days than the strikers had. They enjoyed a starting salary of $1,400 ($0.40/hr) along with a pension plan, and the department covered the cost of their uniforms and equipment ($250). So the replacement officers were the beneficiaries of the strike.

[#] Many of the non-Irish officers were Italian, Scandinavian and Canadian. This Bolshevik conspiracy fear focused on non-Americans, and particularly along religious lines.

Sources: Boston Globe and Wiki.

Submitted for your consideration,

Old Blue
Re: 100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979397 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Sep 12, 2019 8:09am
Thread Board
most of them had fought in World War One, which had ended only 10 months earlier.

World War I was also known as the Great War, or described as "the war to end all wars".
Re: 100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979398 by Oberon_Kenobi
Sep 12, 2019 8:54am
Thread Board
World War I was also known as the Great War, or described as "the war to end all wars".

WorldWarIwasalsoknownastheGreatWar,ordescribedas"thewartoendallwars".
Congratulations NorseGnome on BOTW!
Board: State: Michigan
Sep 12, 2019 1:11pm
Board
Hey all,

Did you see that our own NorseGnome got Box of the Week honors for Paradise Nature Trail ? It's a fabulous box and well-deserving of the honor.

Congratulations!
Re: Code of conduct & Brownie Scouts
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #979352 by Kirbert
Sep 12, 2019 5:02pm
Thread Board
It’s a nice kit. The description says it helps fulfill the last requirement for the badge. There are more requirements - four more - before they earn the badge.

I came into letterboxing with my then-Brownie. She’s a second year junior now, with ~400 finds. She’s much more interested in finding the boxes than stamping and carving. Lol. But as a leader, I try to ensure that all the scouts I go out with know the leave no trace principals, and are respectful of boxes and hiding spots too.