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Read Board: Country: China

Welcome to the Letterboxing China message board!
Board: Country: China
Oct 31, 2004 9:13pm
This message board is open for business! Enjoy!
Looking for letterboxe(r)s in China...
Board: Country: China
Mar 7, 2005 1:15pm
Thread
Just wondering if there are any letterboxe(r)s in China???

dvn2r ckr
Re: Looking for letterboxe(r)s in China...
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #2724 by daelphinus
Mar 25, 2005 5:03pm
Thread
Still looking for boxers or boxes in China--esp Beijing and Xian. Please LMK if any exist around there--soon. ;)

dvn2r ckr
Re: Looking for letterboxe(r)s in China...
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #3144 by DS
Mar 27, 2005 8:16am
Thread
Thanks for the info. I've been geocaching in Korea before--not very successful though as most of the caches were missing and not updated as such (we seemed to be the ones who 'discovered' that they were missing. :( I checked out the geocaches in China a few weeks ago--we'll do a couple of those (despite no GPS) but were just wondering if there were any 'unpublished' letterboxes in China. Not sure how friendly the govt would be of caches/boxes around there.
2 new LBs in China!
Board: Country: China
Apr 28, 2005 3:35am
Thread
There are now 2 new LBs in China. 1 in Northwest China--Xian and another 85 km Northwest of Beijing in Badaling. Future visitors enjoy!

dvn2r ckr
Re: 2 new LBs in China!
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #3836 by daelphinus
May 8, 2005 7:01pm
Thread
I amended the clues, slightly, to the Great Wall letterbox in Badaling--to ensure you're in the correct 'stretch' of Great Wall when you seek out this box. Make sure there is no 'rope car' or 'chair lift' anywhere in the vicinity of where you start your climb. If so, you're not in the right spot and you'll waste an entire trip to the top (all 1,830 stairs of it) looking for it.

dvn2r ckr
letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Dec 4, 2005 10:11pm
Thread
I expect to be in China for ~12 days in January, picking up my second daughter. Will definitely be in Guangzhou, staying on Shamian Island, possibly in Nanning and Guiping, and ??? not sure where else. Would love to plant a few Lboxes, but am concerned that I need to have a translation in Chinese as to what the box is as part of the contents. Is this available?? Thanks!!

akindofmagick
Re: letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #12480 by akindofmagick
Dec 4, 2005 11:17pm
Thread
Quote but am concerned that I need to have a translation in Chinese as to what the box is as part of the contents. Is this available?? Thanks!!


I wouldn't worry too much about a translation. It's nice if you can get it, but ideally, you'll hide it so well nobody will discover it by accident--and chances are, the only people looking for it on purpose will only know English if they get the clue from LbNA or AQ. =)

-- Ryan, who planted boxes in Central America without Spanish translations....
Re: letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #12491 by DS
Dec 5, 2005 6:26am
Thread
I planted 2 boxes in China in April and I did translate labels for the boxes. I did the same thing for our boxes in Korea. Heads up though--it's almost impossible to find anyplace to hide boxes there because the parks are either so well maintained or you have to hide them in 'not-so-pleasant' areas. I also noticed that people were very interested in what we were doing all the time--not sure if they were really watching our children or if they were just studying us--the wierd family wandering around aimlessly in bizarre spots.

You can slightly see the labels in my blog entries about these boxes.

http://dvn2rckr.blogspot.com/2005/04/little-box-for-big-wall.html

http://dvn2rckr.blogspot.com/2005/04/boxin-well-go.html

The boxes are mini-boxes that were exceptionally small but they still proved quite difficult to hide. I've had one person seek out the xi'an box and couldn't find it--but the individual wouldn't clarify anything about the visit so I'm not sure if it was a geocacher in the area or just a joke 'contact the placer' report.

I saved the labels as Powerpoint files but you'll have to give me some time to track those down.

dvn2r ckr
Re: letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #12492 by daelphinus
Dec 5, 2005 6:41am
Thread
Here's what I put on the label. I have NO CLUE if these are the correct words--I used an online translator and tried to find very generic terms. I also tried to 'name' the letterbox, too, using Chinese characters. Not sure if I did that correctly either. I am a little familiar with Korean and used my knowledge of that to create labels in Korean. I just continued along the same lines for these labels in Chinese.

The Chinese characters won't translate in AQ but I can send them to you in a word or .ppt file if you like. Just send me a non-AQ email address and I can send them your way.

Letter 近义词 Box 动 装箱
Hobby 近义词 Game 名 游戏
Don’t 不要 Remove 动 移动 Please 动 使高兴
www.letterboxing.org
Re: letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #12504 by The Wolf Family
Dec 5, 2005 10:59am
Thread
Thanks!

There are 100+ Chinese dialects in China.. but amazingly, Chinese has only one written language (okay, there's the classic and simplified version). You don't write something in Mandarin, or in Cantonese - you SPEAK those languages. The calligraphy is the same, tho.

I have a young penpal in Nanning, and I recently sent her a message consisting of VERY simple, short sentences as translated by Google's new (beta) English > Chinese translator program. She was not impressed, and told me she'd prefer me to continue writing in English. The program translated each word literally, which just doesn't work well with Chinese. She's a student, with very limited time, and I can't comfortably ask her to translate for me.

I'm thinking it may be best to "hide" at least some of the letterboxes in stores or hotels (taking a tip from the Baker's Dozen Dartmoor trip - they located a couple of letterboxes in stores/restaurants), and ask my adoption facilitator in China to jot down a translation to include in the box. It's absolutely true what an earlier poster wrote: when I was in China last year adopting my second daughter, we were watched, followed, and definitely the objects of keen, albeit friendly interest everywhere we went. I'm certain if I tried to sidle into a mass of shrubbery in a park on Shamian Island, I'd be monitored very carefully. On the other hand, had I known about letterboxing on my first trip, I had opportunities in two of Nanning's public parks and on the River Li cruise to conceal a letterbox. I'm planning to prepare two microboxes for each city we visit, and figure that'll be enough for starters - we'll be back!!

Here's a thought: I could put one in a toy, and leave it in a hotel playroom, for example - wonder how often they replace the toys at adoption hotels??!! Hmmm..... Of course, you have to have a hotel room card key to get in the playrooms.. unless they're locked down for measles or chicken pox or whatever... but it's fairly easy to get in via social engineering/piggybacking, altho if you don't have a child with you, you're liable to be a source of concern... the boxer would have to locate the toy (from amid hundreds of toys), get it away from the child playing with it without angering her parents, conceal toy in opaque shopping bag... head over to the hotel restaurant to stamp in... then replace it... is this sort of thang kosher??? And, wouldn't it be fun if it were concealed in a Chinese puzzle box, since it wouldn't have to be weather-safe??!!

brainstorming...

akindofmagick
Re: letterboxing in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #12507 by akindofmagick
Dec 5, 2005 11:13am
Thread
Yep, the dialects may be different but the written characters are the same. Interesting--Korean uses Chinese characters for its 'formal' writing so if you've studied Hanja in Korean then you should be able to read some of the Chinese writing regardless of dialects.

Here's something else I caught onto right away when in China--I've had a little of work-related 'self-study' of Korean over the years and I quickly noticed that Chinese & Korean shared many similarities.

For example:

Nam in Korean means South, Nan in Chinese (at least Mandarin) is South

San in Korean means mountain, Shan, San, or Sam is Chinese for mountain

Do (pronounced do as in do, re, mi) in Korean means island, to (pronounced toe) means island in Chinese, and many others...

Doeng (almost like tongue in English) in Korean means east, and it's the same in Chinese (sometimes pronounced tong instead)

the numbers are practically the same (of course there are about 20 different 'sets' of numbers depending upon what you're trying to count/sort/organize,etc--animate vs inanimate objects, ideas/nouns, you name it)

so the differences aren't that great regarding the more common terms in the grand scheme of things--it's the regional terms that will differ drastically or may just not exist in the other dialect. This is apparently the same between Mandarin & Cantonese.

I also used the same rules for sentence construction in Korean for developing the labels for China. I may be completely off-mark with the translations here but I wanted to emphasize game/hobby and not the 'stealthy' part of it for obvious reasons.

dvn2r ckr
A new letterbox in China
Board: Country: China
Jul 22, 2011 7:15pm
Thread
While a new letter box is not usually post worthy I thought I would say something since there are so few here.

http://www.atlasquest.com/showinfo.html?gBoxId=176305

Lon
Re: A new letterbox in China
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #624007 by lonnewsom
Jul 22, 2011 8:12pm
Thread
Yay! Glad you planted!
Re: Looking for letterboxe(r)s in China...
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #2724 by daelphinus
Dec 24, 2014 6:21am
Thread
Actually now there are several letterboxes in China. I was able to find a really awesome one in Lantau Island, Hong Kong, called Big Buddha. Wow, I really recommend going for that one if you have a half day to go exploring. We left in the morning from our hotel, took a really cheap train ride and then the cable car to the top of the mountain. Cable car was more expensive, but totally, TOTALLY worth it. Directions on transportation are included, and you can also access the cable car that goes to the top of the mountain, directly from the airport. So, if you only are going to have a layover at the airport, you can letterbox and see an amazing site! The views are unbelievable.

The area of the Big Buddha would be easy to plant more letterboxes in and make it a "Letterbox Destination". Just saying. Plenty of fairly quiet trails, and just a perfect location to spend a half day. The urban areas of Hong Kong are trickier to plant in... very landscaped.
Getting letterboxing started in Beijing?
Board: Country: China
Oct 26, 2016 1:11am
Thread
大家好!

I'm an expat living in Beijing. Today I got invited by my company to do a Chinese "cultural activity" which turned out to be a trip to a DIY art studio here in Beijing to do rubber stamp carving! Like, exactly the same technique that I used at home. Maybe Letterboxing isn't so foreign here after all!

I've noticed that although letterboxing is basically dead in China, Meetup is doing well here in Beijing (both expats and Chinese attend events). Now I'm thinking about starting a meetup group to see if letterboxing is something expats/locals living in Beijing would find entertaining.

Am I crazy? Anyone else in Beijing who'd be interested?

Odd Owl
Re: Getting letterboxing started in Beijing?
Board: Country: China
Reply to: #937001 by Odd Owl
Oct 26, 2016 9:14am
Thread
你好! So cool that you want to start a meet-up group to do letterboxing in Beijing. I bet it could really take off with enough initial support and nurturing. I don't think you are crazy - you will likely just have to be patient and give it time to take off.

I would love to help, but I live in the US, although I do travel to Asia a fair amount and have plans to do some planting - especially in Taiwan, and if I make it out soon, in Hong Kong. My thinking is that I will plant stamps with magnetized backings without logbooks or boxes. That will make hiding easier, especially in urban areas, and avoid damp-related maintenance concerns. Just something to consider as you get started as well.

Good luck!