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Read Board: History is Alive

On this day in 1977...
Board: History is Alive
Sep 11, 2019 6:49am
at Baumetes Prison in Marseille, France, Hamida Djandoubi, a Tunisian immigrant convicted of murder, becomes the last person executed by guillotine.

Red John
100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Sep 12, 2019 7:17am
Thread
100 years ago today was the 4th and last day of a strike by the Boston Police officers. The largely Irish-American police force had seen its wages lag badly during the war. Efforts were made to organize in order to gain not only higher pay, but shorter hours and better working conditions. Police Commissioner Edwin U. Curtis refused to sanction a police union and suspended the leaders from the force in August 1919.

On September 9, more than 1,100 officers went out on strike, which removed three-fourths of the force from the city’s streets. In some areas, rabble-rousers looted and rioted. On the following day, Mayor Andrew J. Peters summoned local militia units, which managed to restore order. In anticipation of the strike, all of Boston's newspapers called it "Bolshevistic,"[#] and pleaded with the police to reconsider while predicting dire consequences. This hurt the officers deeply as most of them had fought in World War One, which had ended only 10 months earlier.

Police officers had an extensive list of grievances. Officially they worked ten-hour shifts, but typically recorded weekly totals between 75 and 90 hours, with no overtime pay. They were not paid for time spent on court appearances. They complained about having to share beds and the lack of sanitation, baths, and toilets at many of the 19 station houses where they were required to live. Their pay was $0.25 /hour, considerably less that the average Bostonian civil servant's. According to the US Census, average wages in America at the time were $1.25 per hour.

They also objected to being required to perform such tasks as "delivering unpaid tax bills, surveying rooming houses, taking the census, or watching the polls at elections" and checking the backgrounds of prospective jurors as well as serving as "errand boys" for their officers.

In the 4 days of the strike, 9 people were killed, 8 by the State Guard, who had virtually no experience in crowd control.

Ultimately all of the striking officers were fired, nearly 1200 in all. The replacement officers hired in the wake of the strike received higher salaries and more vacation days than the strikers had. They enjoyed a starting salary of $1,400 ($0.40/hr) along with a pension plan, and the department covered the cost of their uniforms and equipment ($250). So the replacement officers were the beneficiaries of the strike.

[#] Many of the non-Irish officers were Italian, Scandinavian and Canadian. This Bolshevik conspiracy fear focused on non-Americans, and particularly along religious lines.

Sources: Boston Globe and Wiki.

Submitted for your consideration,

Old Blue
Re: 100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979397 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Sep 12, 2019 8:09am
Thread
most of them had fought in World War One, which had ended only 10 months earlier.

World War I was also known as the Great War, or described as "the war to end all wars".
Re: 100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979398 by Oberon_Kenobi
Sep 12, 2019 8:54am
Thread
World War I was also known as the Great War, or described as "the war to end all wars".

WorldWarIwasalsoknownastheGreatWar,ordescribedas"thewartoendallwars".
Re: 100 years Ago - No Cops in Boston!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979398 by Oberon_Kenobi
Sep 12, 2019 5:09pm
Thread
described as "the war to end all wars".

I prefer to describe it as part "One" of the World War with a 20 year intermission to follow.
Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Sep 14, 2019 3:10pm
Thread
On this day in 1814, Francis Scott Key pens a poem which is later set to music and in 1931 becomes America’s national anthem, The Star-Spangled Banner. The poem was written after Key witnessed the Maryland fort being bombarded for over 27 hours by dozens of British ships during the War of 1812. Key was inspired by the sight of a lone U.S. flag still flying over Fort McHenry at daybreak, as reflected in the now-famous words: “... And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.”

Am I the only person who get chills when I hear it?

Old Blue
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979427 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Sep 14, 2019 3:32pm
Thread
I personally love that our national anthem has stuff blowing up in it. :)
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979427 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Sep 14, 2019 6:06pm
Thread
My favorite has always been when Whitney Houston sang it at the Super Bowl. She is one of the few people who had a powerful enough voice and the range to really nail it that well. I'm sure there are other great versions but that one is my favorite.
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979429 by MissMoon
Sep 14, 2019 6:16pm
Thread
Ace Frehley does a fantastic electric guitar rendition, too. <3
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979429 by MissMoon
Sep 15, 2019 4:36am
Thread
I recently found this version. Love it.
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979427 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Sep 15, 2019 7:07am
Thread
Beautiful song. If there is a better version than Marc Anthony’s, I haven’t heard it:

https://youtu.be/c8BCp9WgUCE
Re: Francis Scott Key's Star-Spangled Banner
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #979439 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Sep 15, 2019 9:04am
Thread
Ok, everyone is putting their favorite up, so....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_lCmBvYMRs

Powerful voice that could handle a difficult melody and joy in the presentation.