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Shay's Rebellion - This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Aug 29, 2017 8:28pm
Thread
Daniel Shay was a leader of protests primarily over the failure of the US government to pay back wages it owed to thousands of veterans of the revolutionary war. It is important because it pointed out the glaring deficiency of Congress under the Articles of Confederation. The protests lasted several months, disrupting various forms of government.

Shay's Rebellion is important because it was the catalyst to organize a Constitutional Convention to create a stronger federal government. As my history professor liked to say, "It's not what it is, it is what it represents."

Old Blue
Re: Shays' Rebellion - This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #950694 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Aug 30, 2017 11:17am
Thread
Let me pontificate here--Daniel Shays was the leader so the apostrophe comes after the s not before. Ain't grammar a hoot.
Re: Shays' Rebellion - This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #950722 by Wronghat
Aug 30, 2017 3:41pm
Thread
It is a spelling thing (Shays vs Shay), not a grammar thing.

Old Blue
aka John Steele not John Steel
This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Jan 22, 2018 1:46pm
Thread
The Victoria blurb states that her 65-year-old reign over the British Empire is the longest--last year (2017) Queen Elizabeth II's reign exceeded that of Victoria.
Re: This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #955812 by Wronghat
Jan 22, 2018 1:49pm
Thread
The Victoria blurb states that her 65-year-old reign over the British Empire is the longest--last year (2017) Queen Elizabeth II's reign exceeded that of Victoria.

Hmmmm... looks correct to me! *whistling innocently*
This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Jan 22, 2018 2:44pm
Thread
It has today as John Hurt's birthday. He died January 25, 2017. He was 77 when he died.
Re: This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #955815 by J Walkers
Jan 22, 2018 2:55pm
Thread
It has today as John Hurt's birthday. He died January 25, 2017. He was 77 when he died.

Yes... but it's STILL his birthday.
I am of the opinion that we should keep the Birthdays in there, even for those that have passed away.

But hey, TG is in charge, so I shall defer to her ultimate wisdom.

Or ultimately defer to her wisdom.

Or defer to the wisdom of her ultimatum.

Something like that.

MORE WINE!!!!
Re: This Day in History
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #955813 by wassamatta u
Jan 22, 2018 3:19pm
Thread
Thanks.
155 Years ago, the battle of Gettysburg begins
Board: History is Alive
Jul 1, 2018 11:09am
Thread
Major General John Reynolds decided to bring his wing of the Army of the Potomac up and fight at Gettysburg. He effectively decided the location of the 1863 show-down in Pennsylvania. He died less than a hour after he made that decision. He was a really good general, maybe if he had lived, he'd have been great. We will never know.

5 weeks ago, I planted a letterbox dedicated to Reynolds, not far from where he was killed. You should go to Gettysburg, not just to letterbox, but to learn some of the 10s of thousands of amazing stories that are the essence of what America is. Stories ranging from who will win the war to those of local civilians who were completely overwhelmed by what they saw.

And BTW, there are many well planted boxes in the area.

Old Blue
this day in history
Re: 155 Years ago, the battle of Gettysburg begins
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #961903 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Jul 1, 2018 1:33pm
Thread
Great Idea!
Re: 155 Years ago, the battle of Gettysburg begins
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #961903 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Jul 1, 2018 1:38pm
Thread
Nice! ⚔️
Re: 155 Years ago, the battle of Gettysburg begins
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #961903 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Jul 2, 2018 6:13am
Thread
We are hoping to visit next year. My civil war buff hubby has a list of battlefields to visit. This is #1
And I'm excited to find some stamps.

Thanks for the history lesson!
My God, is this all of the men?
Board: History is Alive
Jul 3, 2018 12:04pm
Thread
Here is a little remembered story from the second day at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Major General Winfield Hancock exclaimed, "My God, is this all of the men we have here?" "Yes", replied Colonel Colvill of the First Minnesota. Hancock pointed to a Confederate battle line not 200 yards way and ordered, "Advance, Colonel and take those colors." Hancock needed time - 5 maybe 10 minutes - enough to bring up more troops. He knew that he had just ordered a suicide attack, so did the men of the First Minnesota. Known as a regiment that never faltered in its duty, the 1st Minnesota Volunteers were severely tested during the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg. Arriving there with 262 men of the original 1,000, they had already shown their undaunted courage on several previous battlefields.

Without any hesitation, the regiment leaped into a battle line with bayonets fixed and advanced at a "double-quick" towards the 1,600 Alabamans led by Confederate General Wilcox. Luckily for the Minnesotans, Wilcox's men were slowed by thickets in Plum Run and had lost some of their organization. Nonetheless the First advanced under galling fire, while still maintaining tight order. As they drew near to the confederates, the Minnesotans broke into a run, straight into the enemy.

The sight of a well-disciplined line with bayonets leveled, approaching almost relentlessly, was more than Wilcox's front line could bear and they broke for the rear. This in turn disrupted Wilcox's second line. Soon though, the 1st Minnesotans were overwhelmed and ordered to retreat back to the ridge where they'd begun. Fifteen minutes after the attack order, it was over, but only 47 men rallied around their flag. The rest lay in the field between them and Plum Run. They proudly had done their duty again and gave Winfield Hancock the 10 minutes needed to bring up more troops.

The Union line held. Submitted for your consideration,

Old Blue
Re: My God, is this all of the men?
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #962001 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Jul 3, 2018 12:08pm
Thread
Mae West is also credited with the quotation with a slightly different connotation.
The 14th Amendment - Most Important of them all
Board: History is Alive
Jul 9, 2018 12:09am
The Fourteenth Amendment was ratified 150 years ago today to address post-Civil War issues. Three of its sections were concerned with issues long ago put to rest in this country. Section One, on the other hand IMHO, is the most important of all amendments. It guarantees due process AND equal protection under the law.

" No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

This is pretty much all that stands between individual rights and the tyranny of out of control government.

Old Blue
appreciative of my rights
100 Years Ago... more/less
Board: History is Alive
Aug 10, 2018 8:54pm
The following was in the Nantucket Inquirer & Mirror, dated July 26 of this year. This event seems a bit surreal in today's world, but my aunts and uncles, as well as, Doublesaj's Dad were all alive when it occurred. It was not that long ago.

Last Sunday (July 21st, 1918) a German submarine appeared suddenly off Cape Cod and sank 3 coal barges and almost demolished their tug. The sound of German guns broke the stillness of the morning air and the submarine showed up on the horizon. Our correspondent on Cape Cod phoned this newspaper, telling us that the guns of the submarine were banging and that the menfolk of the Cape, some of them hatless and coatless, had grabbed their guns and hastened to the shore to give the Germans a warm reception should they dare to set foot on land.

Submitted for your consideration,
Old Blue
You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog... 66 years ago today
Board: History is Alive
Aug 13, 2018 3:09pm
Thread
On August 13, 1952, 19-year-old songwriters Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller wrote a song in 15 minutes on their way to the recording studio. When they arrived, blues singer Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton recorded the original version of “Hound Dog.” Big Mama's blues-infused dressing-down of a no-account man spent 7 weeks at number one on Billboard’s R&B chart.

Over the next four years, versions of Hound Dog were recorded by at least 10 different artists, but none matched Thornton's moderate success.

Then came Elvis.

In June 1956, on the Milton Berle Show, Presley's show-stopping mock-burlesque version of "Hound Dog", playfully bumping and grinding created enormous public controversy. So a few weeks later on The Steve Allen Show, they slowed down his act, with an amused Presley in a tuxedo and blue suede shoes singing to a basset hound. Allen pronounced Presley "a good sport".

The day after the Steve Allen Show appearance, Elvis recorded "Hound Dog". Within two weeks after it was released, a million copies had sold and before long, 10 million had sold worldwide. Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, ranks it at #19. Not bad for a song written by two teenagers in 15 minutes!

Over the years "Hound Dog" has been the subject of an inordinate number of lawsuits, and "would eventually become one of the most litigated songs in recorded music history".

This song reminds me of a GREAT letterbox called Old Troop that's near Cherokee, Alabama.

Submitted for Your Consideration,

Old Blue
sounds like a name for a coon dog
Re: You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog... 66 years ago today
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #963832 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Aug 13, 2018 4:14pm
Thread
I imagine Elvis' version was vastly different from its original version, which I believe is the point of "remaking" an old song. To sing it exactly the same is rather asinine. (Yeah, I am looking at you Weezer with Africa and Roseanna, AUGH!)

csk
Re: You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog... 66 years ago today
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #963832 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Aug 13, 2018 5:12pm
Thread
Great write up and thanks for the notice. I was 1 when Elvis recorded his version. Man, I miss him. The only exception I take to your post is that E was “amused”. It’s well known in some circles he felt humiliated of the performance. He said himself:
It was the most ridiculous appearance I ever did and I regret ever doing it.
~ELVIS PRESLEY

Still he was a good sport about it.

Link to Thornton’s version: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XRVnJ89oisM
Re: You Ain't Nothin' but a Hound Dog... 66 years ago today
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #963835 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Aug 14, 2018 8:23am
Thread
Big Mama Thornton's version is much more my style that Elvis'. Thanks for the link.

The only exception I take to your post is that E was “amused”.

I should have gotten the hint that he wasn't "amused" because elsewhere I read that Elvis never returned to New York City after that.

Old Blue
I was 2 when Elvis was on the Steve Allen Show
Editorial Page - 150 Years Ago
Board: History is Alive
Nov 7, 2018 9:19am
Thread
From the Inquirer & Mirror, Nantucket MA. November 1868

Election of the President - Not a quarter century ago, a worthy, but not prophetic Unitarian preacher on (Nantucket) Island told his congregation that the transfer of the chief magistracy of our nation is so quietly affected that we do not perceive change, while in countries ruled by monarchs, his death is often the signal for war.

Yet, we have seen a most gigantic war kindle by the election of a new president; a war that cost millions of treasure and hecatombs of victims. Now we are on the eve of another change of rulers, and cannot but regard the approach of the decisive day with some degree of concern. We are hopeful that General Ulysses Grant is the coming man. Yet we must not be lulled into inaction. Our victory, although bloodless, will not destroy manifestations of southern hate.


Comment by Old Blue:
Grant, a Republican, won the election over Horatio Seymour by a large margin. Interestingly, Grant failed to carry New York, New Jersey, Delaware or Maryland. The Republican party of that time stood for a strong federal government. (I think if them as "Federalists" rather that Republicans.) The Democratic Party believed in localized government and states rights.

In 1868, Reconstruction and civil rights of former slaves was a hotly debated issue in the Union. According to Wiki, Grant supported the Reconstruction plans of the Radical Republicans in Congress, which favored the 14th Amendment, with full citizenship and civil rights for freed people, including suffrage for adult freedmen. The Democratic platform demanded a restoration of states' rights, including the right of southern states to determine for themselves whether to allow suffrage for adult freedmen.

Submitted for your consideration,

Old Blue
Re: Editorial Page - 150 Years Ago
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968032 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Nov 8, 2018 4:14pm
Thread
the thing that fascinated me about this quote was the fact that a preacher delivered this. have we changed so much that we disregard or reject what the word of God has to say about how we should structure our government? there was an entire group of men who, during the war of independence earned the title of the black-robed regiment from the king. men such as Peter Muhlenberg, James Caldwell, and John Witherspoon.
this is a bit of history I wish would return

thus it is manifest, in the spirit of our history, in our annals and by the general voice of the fathers of the republic, that, in a very great degree -
it is to the pulpit, the puritan pulpit, we owe the moral force which won our independence.
100 Years ago - The Forgotten Fight of the Belleau Wood
Board: History is Alive
Nov 10, 2018 9:16pm
Thread
In late May 1918, the German Army broke through the French army's line northeast of Paris. Germany's goal was to take Paris before the Americans were in full fighting condition and to force the French & English to capitulate. The Germans were not going to have their way.

On June 1, about 7500 US Marines, along with US Army and French troops were sent to plug the gap. The Marines had just taken their position when orders from the French High Command came in telling them to retreat and dig a new line of defensive trenches in the rear. Marine General James Harbord, countermanded the French "desires", and ordered the Marines to "hold where they stand". With bayonets, the Marines dug shallow fighting positions from which they could fight from the prone position.

This began the month-long Battle of Belleau (Bell-ow) Wood. It was an old hunting preserve of forest with densely overgrown brush and vines. The area had hills and gullies; it was a perfect location for the Germans to fortify... and they did. They had dozens of machine gun nests and artillery support. In addition, the area was surrounded by wheat fields, so any attack would have to cross a quarter mile of open ground before they reached the tree-line.

At this point in the war, nobody but the Americans would consider taking such a position. The Marine commander was determined, so that was that. The Germans soon learned that these American Marines were different from anyone they had previously encountered. Later a German private, whose company had 30 men left out of 120, wrote, "We had Americans opposite us who are terribly reckless fellows." An official German report classified the Marines as "vigorous, self-confident, and remarkable marksmen". The American commander of US forces, Major General John Pershing, said, "The deadliest weapon in the world is a United States Marine and his rifle."

The Marines would either succeed or die. Over and over they charged and overran machine gun nests at a horrendous cost. A 44-year-old Marine sergeant, Dan Daly, who already had two Medals of Honor from earlier conflicts, is said to have yelled to the men, “Come on, you SOBs, do you want to live forever?”

These "reckless" Americans broke the morale of the German Soldier, and at the same time their French alias were instilled with a new vigor. American Marine Battalion Commander, Frederick Wise later wrote:

"Though everywhere I could see Marines who had been killed by machine guns and snipers, though there were plenty of dead Germans killed by rifle fire, nowhere was there any sign that the Germans had stood face to face with Marines at close quarters and fought it out.

On May 31st, I had in my unit nine hundred and sixty-five men and twenty six officers -- the best battalion I ever saw anywhere. I had taken them, raw recruits for the most. Ten months I had trained them. I had seen them grow into Marines. Now [28 days later] before me stood three hundred and fifty men and six officers."


May 31, 1918 marked the high tide of the German offensive. Soon after, the German Army was in full retreat with the English, French and American armies snapping at their heels. Four and a half montha later, on November 11th, an armistice was declared, and the fighting stopped... but the war was NOT over.

After the Marines had taken the Belleau Wood, the French 6th Army issued a proclamation that changed the name to Bois de la Brigade de Marine - Woods of the Marine Brigade.

This mostly forgotten Marine endeavor far exceeds the contribution the Marines made at the Halls of Montezuma... to be continued.
Re: 100 Years ago - The Forgotten Fight of the Belleau Wood
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968185 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Nov 11, 2018 9:11am
Thread
Thank you for sharing!
Re: 100 Years ago - The Forgotten Fight of the Belleau Wood
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968185 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Nov 11, 2018 9:04pm
Thread
The Lost Battalion is the name given to the nine companies of the United States 77th Division, roughly 554 men, isolated by German forces during World War I after an American attack in the Argonne Forest in October 1918. Commanded by Major Charles White Whittlesey a Lawyer from NY. Most of his men were from New York City. During the October Muse-Arregone battle, Maj. Whittlesay was ordered to take the high ground with an American regiment on his left flank and a French on his right. His commanding General Ordering him to Advance and do not retreat. Both of the flanking units were stalled in their advance and were ordered to retreat, only Maj. Whittlesay's unit managed to make it to the high ground. They did not know of the other units not advancing, nor did he know he was surrounded at first. His troops mostly made up of the working poor from every Ghetto of NY. Many of them learning of the bigger world, did not want to just go back to pushing carts, but had hope for something more. A lieutenant from the American forces was captured and was interrogated by the german military. Specifically why they were not surrendering or taking the opportunity to retreat to their lines. The lieutenant plainly spoke to the german officer that the US Army cleared out every Ghetto from NY finding every Gangster they could, Gave them a riffle and then something they never had. Hope, for a better future. The German military had been fighting a Gentleman's War with the French and British, all this time. You take some ground, you give some up, you surrender when surrounded, you retreat, to try again. The Americans fighting over there, were reclass as it was put. Why retreat when you just fought so hard to get the land you got, why surrender, I can still fight. Specifically in the case of Bellue Woods, one infamous quote from a marine officer after being ordered to retreat " Retreat, Hell we just got here"
Re: 100 Years ago - The Forgotten Fight of the Belleau Wood
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968218 by StasiaBoo
Nov 12, 2018 8:30am
Thread
I think the attitude of, "Hell we just got here" was prevalent among the Americans.

Interesting story, great post!

Old Blue
HE"S ALIVE!
Board: History is Alive
Nov 23, 2018 10:22am
Thread
One of my favorite historical authors is still alive - Herman Wouk! Go here to learn more about him and why I like his work.

Old Blue
Re: HE"S ALIVE!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968639 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Nov 23, 2018 12:15pm
Thread
I see he wrote his autobiography at the age of 100. I didn't know he wrote 'Marjorie Morningstar'.
Re: HE"S ALIVE!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968642 by MissMoon
Nov 23, 2018 7:25pm
Thread
I'd read anything he's written.
Re: HE"S ALIVE!
Board: History is Alive
Reply to: #968639 by DoubleSaj and Old Blue
Nov 24, 2018 8:36am
Thread
Cool! Thanks for the suggestion.