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Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920114 by Rocklun
Feb 12, 2016 11:25am
Thread
Voice of experience? I hope not, because that's an image I don't want stuck in my head...

Too late! Plus now every time you see a cute little deer . . . . .

And imagine what I do to scare the squirrels away
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920114 by Rocklun
Feb 12, 2016 11:27am
Thread
that's an image I don't want stuck in my head...

Feeling thankful I have my eye bleach patches!
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920116 by dingus dufus
Feb 12, 2016 2:13pm
Thread
And imagine what I do to scare the squirrels away

Nope. Don't wanna. Not gonna. Can't make me.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #919875 by Lone R
Feb 12, 2016 7:21pm
Thread
well i must say that i have read the comments and it still confuses me. online logging with the ability to leave comments i just can't see as important. a nice perk yes. but hardley, imho, important.
leaving comments for future finders. i always found reading the logbook to be a wealth of information.
yes, feedback is nice. that is why you should always contact the placer. like in a nice personal note.
it is not that i am against leaving comments, not the case at all. it does sadden me that i hear of so many that won't go search for a box because it hasn't been found in awhile or because of a questionable comment or even because it has a store bought stamp. perhaps it saddens me that we have come to rely on too many bells and whistles instead of the relying on the search. which is basically what the ability to make a comment is ...... another bell.
smile
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #919965 by Public Hand
Feb 13, 2016 6:28am
Thread
But it's really sad. How awful they must feel to have spent so much time and money. And they don't know how to make their garden any better, since re-planting won't help.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #919970 by Mrs Judson's Souffle
Feb 13, 2016 6:34am
Thread
Also getting off topic, re: deer
The week my dog made contact with a deer and her droppings [in our yard], he became extremely ill with Giardia. Talking cleaning up massive diarrhea every morning, because he could not hold it, even for 4 hours. What a horrible experience. And if we did not do adequate hand washing, we were also at risk.

It is not fun having deer in one's yard.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920028 by Kirbert
Feb 13, 2016 6:37am
Thread
You sure you want the deer?
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920030 by Kirbert
Feb 13, 2016 6:39am
Thread
We have rather aggressive deer. Not afraid to block traffic, and they do not leave when chased or yelled at.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920099 by MissMoon
Feb 13, 2016 6:40am
Thread
They also say coyote urine and dog urine. And those do not work. Not even on rabbits.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920141 by Sunia
Feb 13, 2016 6:54am
Thread
We have rather aggressive deer. Not afraid to block traffic, and they do not leave when chased or yelled at.

Let's hope your situation doesn't progress to this!!!

(I have to admit that I laughed when I saw the road sign.)
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920144 by Rocklun
Feb 13, 2016 7:19am
Thread
I have to admit that I laughed when I saw the road sign.

They amused some others too:

Three of those signs were quickly stolen.

I think they'll eventually get used to the dogs too and they'll have to do something more.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920133 by uneksia
Feb 13, 2016 8:50am
Thread
I agree but it is what it is. The game has enough elbow room and customization to play it how you want, so you can go look for old boxes and boxes with questionable comments if you want to, and not leave comments if you don't want to (if the box has problems, and it is listed there, then I think there is a social contract to at least notify the planter, if not leave a comment).

I just found a WOM clue from 2003 I'm gonna look for. Its not in my area, which is why I never looked for it, and it is prolly missing, but I'll be in the area soon, so why not? I think more people than you think look for boxes that haven't been found in a while, but who knows? I mean, isn't there some thrill of history to finding some well-aged boxes? To each their own really.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920133 by uneksia
Feb 13, 2016 9:32am
Thread
online logging with the ability to leave comments i just can't see as important.

Sometimes I think very helpful. We boxed a series - last box was 3 miles from the parking lot. A small sign (that we didn't notice) said they locked the parking lot gate at XX time, which was at least 2 hours before sunset. All of the mountain bikers that we ran across said that the park closes at sunset. Very true. They just close the parking a lot sooner, as we found out, the hard way. We left a comment for future boxers - Heads Up! Give yourself plenty of time. You don't wanna get locked in like we did!!!

Comments can also be helpful if clues are poorly written or circumstances have changed. Some planters are no longer active and cannot be contacted, so a clue cannot be modified.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920156 by JampersandJ
Feb 13, 2016 9:58am
Thread
They just close the parking a lot sooner, as we found out, the hard way. We left a comment for future boxers - Heads Up! Give yourself plenty of time. You don't wanna get locked in like we did!!!

Anyone else have bolt cutters in their car, just for these reasons?

Jeff (not promoting criminal behavior - really)
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920140 by Sunia
Feb 13, 2016 11:22am
Thread
They haven't been a problem. We don't own any pets, although we had a cat for 12 years. The cat would just lay in the yard while the deer were eating. And we've had a couple of tick bites over the years, but haven't caught any diseases from them yet.

A neighbor of ours has a fenced-in 5 acres, and although his house is on it there's an acre or so he's left as wilderness. Pregnant deer will leap his fence to give birth inside his fence, then come and go to feed while leaving the fawn inside until old enough to jump out. IOW, they use his fence to protect their fawns from predators.

One time that didn't work. We found a fawn tangled in his fence. In trying to leap the fence, it had tripped over the top strand of barbed wire and got it completely wrapped around one foot and was hanging from it. Poor thing was exhausted, but otherwise not seriously hurt. SWMBO and I went out there with wire cutters, cut the strand, and carefully unwrapped it from the fawn's foot before releasing it outside the fence. Then we repaired the fence while the fawn went off to find its mom.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920141 by Sunia
Feb 13, 2016 11:26am
Thread
In the residential neighborhood where my brother lives near Austin, Texas, they have deer crossings that are painted on the pavement; they look like crosswalks. And the deer actually use them. And in front of each one there's a sign that, rather than saying "Deer Crossing", says "Do Not Feed The Deer". Some people feed the deer in their yards anyway, which makes everyone else angry because most people hate the deer and wish they'd go away. It's too populated an area to even think about shooting one.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920144 by Rocklun
Feb 13, 2016 11:43am
Thread
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920145 by Oberon_Kenobi
Feb 13, 2016 11:44am
Thread
Sooner or later, they're gonna hafta start shooting them. They won't get used to that! Use the meat to feed the needy.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920159 by Kirbert
Feb 13, 2016 12:19pm
Thread
It's too populated an area to even think about shooting one.

With a firearm. But bow hunting would probably work, if it were legal. At least an arrow won't go very far.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920157 by FORAYCH
Feb 13, 2016 2:08pm
Thread
Well, there were other hikers w/families locked in, so we didn't feel too stupid. Someone already had called the phone number on the sign, but it was still a 30 minute wait. I wonder how often the park people have to go back and let people out?

There are some other parks in my area that close the lot gates at 5 pm, even in the summer!
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920174 by JampersandJ
Feb 13, 2016 2:14pm
Thread
It's great there was a sign with a phone number.

I tend to be in the areas with no sign and bad cell reception. Then my little friend is helpful and gets me unstuck
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920165 by Oberon_Kenobi
Feb 13, 2016 4:27pm
Thread
But bow hunting would probably work, if it were legal.

It's legal in New York. They bow hunt deer in some areas from time to time in an official thinning out operation. There's one in a sanctuary near me every winter.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920157 by FORAYCH
Feb 13, 2016 4:43pm
Thread
Anyone else have bolt cutters in their car, just for these reasons?

Yes, and have used them. The sign said that the gate was locked at 4:00pm (4+ hours before dark in July) but when I tried to leave at 2:00 the gate was locked!
(The chain was extremely long so I cut the last link, and reconnected it to look locked once I got out. There was at least a dozen cars still in the park when I left!)
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920165 by Oberon_Kenobi
Feb 13, 2016 10:31pm
Thread
A 12-gauge won't go very far, either -- but it's not as quiet as the bow. The area is hilly, which means a smart hunter could easily position himself on high ground so he's shooting downward at the deer, anything that makes it past the deer just goes into the dirt. Of course, it's Texas, that means there is no dirt, it's all rocks, it'll just bounce off and head off somewhere at random. My brother likes long-range target shooting, but you can't do it in Texas at all because the bullets travel 1000 yards, bounce off a rock, then travel another 1000 yards in some random direction.

He lives on a hill overlooking Lake Travis, and the stairs down to his boat launch tend to be infested with snakes. He decided the solution was to buy a .410 gauge shotgun, not a serious weapon, just a little scattergun that'd be good for popping the occasional snake without attracting too much attention from the neighbors. He's the gun nut but even I coulda told him the problem with that plan: There's nothing non-serious about a .410 gauge, it's a powerful shotgun. He apparently found out his mistake quickly and ended up giving me the .410. Here in Florida, it's a fine firearm to have.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920183 by RIclimber
Feb 13, 2016 10:34pm
Thread
Hey, I've got a geocache planted in S GA that's in a gated cemetery that gets locked and unlocked apparently at random. I put instructions in the cache listing to park outside and walk in, but some smart aleck found the gate open and drove in -- and then found it locked when he tried to drive back out. In the middle of the day! Fortunately, he was able to remove the gate from its hinge!
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920144 by Rocklun
Feb 14, 2016 5:40am
Thread
For goodness sake! Our deer is not afraid of barking from our late dog. But no attacks from the deer.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920158 by Kirbert
Feb 14, 2016 5:45am
Thread
Oh, no. Our deer also gave birth just on the other side of our fence, and came over to eat all our hosta and lilies. Then we added higher deer fence, but a hawk got caught, upside down, just as you described. I had SPCA come collect the hawk. Those talons were dangerous.
Re: New Lyme disease bacterium identified
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920159 by Kirbert
Feb 14, 2016 5:47am
Thread
It is illegal to feed deer in our town. Too many deer/car collisions.
Re: When was online logging introduced to Atlas Quest?
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Reply to: #920194 by Kirbert
Feb 14, 2016 9:00am
Thread
he was able to remove the gate from its hinge!

Another example of unhinged geocaching activity ;)
About that whole archiving, retiring, comment hints thing
Board: Letterbox Chatter
Feb 14, 2016 5:28pm
Thread
I’m out doing long-delayed maintenance and picking up a couple missed boxes in Jack Brooks Park. My first “find” of the day is a vandalized box, now a trail-encrusted felt square and a baggie. My first maintenance effort is also vandalized. Ed Gorey’s Cat has the top of the l’n’l intentionally smashed, tossed on the ground at the hide site next to the baggie. No stamp or logbook in sight. This followed up with an actual find, so, YAY.

My next maintenance box, also vandalized, was Schrodinger’s Cat, and was even more distressing because I find the idea of a cat in a box (or not) hysterically funny. This one stings. The stamp is lying on the ground, 3 insect-perfected holes bored clean through the stamp. Fortunately, 2 are in the negative space. But one is not. My l'n'l is history. Who wants those?

I am annoyed. Three vandalized boxes later, I'm thinking we have a new-found common enemy in case we ever tire of picking on geocachers: Frisbee golfers. I personally think they are just stoners (well, I assumed that's what they were doing, since I wouldn't . . . ok fine. It was what it smelled like) taking revenge on the boxes to mitigate the disappointment they feel when they realize the special little prizes they just found next to their flicked-away Marlboro butts in the woods are not, in fact, a drug drop or someone’s dope stash, nor freshly microwaved 50-cent gas station burritos. The park on the frisbee golf side has more beer cans littering it than a parking lot on prom night. I must confess that originally, I thought that any sport that involved keeping one hand free to wrap around a beer and involving no running or sweating whatsoever was the sport for me! However, they are, in fact, pigs. Grape Swisher Sweets sucking oinkers.

Next up, Ziggy Rain, a 2005 Baby Bear box from LbNA. Of course, I left the clues at work. I have no idea how long it’s been between finds, or how much to expect the terrain to have changed. I figure I’ll just bully my way to the #5 basket as a shortcut, using the clue from Box Radar. Um, nope. Anyway, I finally resort to following the clues, which work just fine. Imagine that. (Sloooooooow learner.) I find what I think is the tree, straight-led by the clues to a cedar with multiple branches meeting about 3 feet up.

There are muggles playing a hole of Frisbee golf nearby, but no matter. I have enough cover here, even though they are only 20 feet away. Plus, did I mention they were all oblivious? There is no way the most likely tree could support a pile of sticks the clues say I’m supposed to be putting back, A stick, maybe. Two sticks? Possibly. But SPOR? No way. But it’s the only tree that works with the clues, which so far have been accurate.

I poke gingerly around the wooly crotch netherbits of the tree. And get a promising hollow thump. Is that a bit of camo duct tape? The box is seriously wedged, damnit. It clearly has been awhile since this was planted, my friends, and I find that the tree has actually grown around the box, trapping it inside its hiding spot. Just how long has it been? I do a happy dance. Because I found the box? Um, sure. Also, because. . .ants.

Usually, they get riled up, then vacate the area and I can get the box. I am patient that way. Plus, I am waiting for the muggles to finish their hole, so I won’t have to worry about making noise. They are taking forever. I contemplate toughing it out and just pulling and pulling and pulling, until I imagine the ants having a head start for the tenderest regions of my armpits. I consider that maybe hopping around, stripping off my shirt to slap the ants off while simultaneously screaming and crashing into trees might blow my cover.

I release the box. Brush off ants. Have another go. Brush off ants. Reach. Brush. Reach. I really need to cough. The ants can move faster than I can grip. This continues for awhile until I realize that sucker is not going anywhere without a good grip and some force. I try another approach. Literally. Amazingly, the situation looks exactly the same from the other side. I think maybe I can grab the branch further up and use some leverage to pull it apart lower down. Alas, it’s not really a branch, more like a TRUNK. I take a thin stick and scrape away debris from around the box to try to get some wiggle room. Brush ants. Yay! It now slides up and down! But it can’t be turned toward an opening. If only I had a SAW in my backpack like the a-hole Frisbee player who is cutting down a tree preventing him from an easier shot at the goal. I wish I were kidding. ("Hold my beer and watch this!")

For a moment, I considered the cosmic satisfaction of just leaving it be, letting it grow into the tree, becoming one with its secret hiding spot and only I would know it was there, a smug secret I would take with me to my grave.

When I finally bullied the box free (oh, yes. Did you really have doubts that would be the final outcome?) WITHOUT, I might add, resorting to breaking the box. No, I’m like a fat chick with a cookie in a trap. (Which they haven’t invented, yet, but if they had, it would have been just like that.) I’m still not really sure how it came out. It was actually squashed from the pressure of the tree growing. When I opened the box, I figure out why the ants just kept coming. They were INSIDE the box. They were INSIDE the baggie with the logbook. They were INSIDE the logbook. They were UNDER the duct tape camo on the box. They were all over my compass. They were crawling on my logbook. (There were not, however, currently in my armpit. I know you were worried.)

When I logged the find at home, I had to laugh. What a coup! Now you tell me. Would you have gone for a box that had been archived on LbNA, whose owner had written MISSING next to the clue, and which had as a last find a reported attempt in 2005? Would you? Me, neither! It was just dumb luck, lots of dumb, that I failed to notice everything suggesting it wasn't there. Kismet and the aberrations are the most fun sometimes. And I didn't get a single ant bite. So I somewhat happily retired my boxes and am hoping someone miraculously finds my Ed Gorey's cat stamp and by some insane miracle makes a liar out of me and calls the whole of recognized known truth into question. Long live chaos. I can be forgiven, perhaps, for not putting it back exactly as I'd found it.