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Re: The Irishman~ A Netflix Original
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981465 by MissMoon
Nov 28, 2019 4:28pm
Thread
The effect on the faces was not make-up. It was done digitally.

Eitherway, it was terrible.

csk
Re: The Irishman~ A Netflix Original
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981468 by Captain Slick Kitty
Nov 28, 2019 5:30pm
Thread
I think it was much more than a “mafia movie”. The perhaps imperfect digital work shouldn’t keep people away from what is a brilliant piece of film making.

After the credits end there is a fascinating conversation between the actors and Scorsese.
Re: The Irishman~ A Netflix Original
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981469 by MissMoon
Nov 29, 2019 12:57pm
Thread
Totally agree with MissMoon. This is a brilliant film and is a character story much more than it is a mob movie. See it.

As for the length, we watched it over two nights and it was perfect. Gave us something to look forward to.

Great performances. Digital makeup didn’t bother me at all.
My Annual Christmas Movie Plug: I Remember Mama
Board: Movie Moments
Dec 7, 2019 7:28am
My annual Christmas movie plug:

Every Xmas my grandfather would sit us down and make us watch "I Remember Mama". It is not Xmas movie. It is a movie about a Norwegian family who lives in the early 1900s in San Francisco. And it is, in my opinion, the perfect movie.

Irene Dunn is perfect as "Mama".
There is Uncle Chris, the "black Norwegian".
There is Uncle Elizabeth, the cat.
There are that Aunts you won't like.
And there is my favorite part when you learn about Uncle Chris' secret.

Every year I promote this movie in memory of my grandfather. And because he was right. This is a wonderful movie.

csk
My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part I~ Knives Out
Board: Movie Moments
Dec 7, 2019 12:20pm
Thread
Knives Out! ~Christopher Plummer Part I

Currently out for release is the family wondering whodunnit in Knives Out.

The premises is as followed:

On the day of Harlan Thromby's 85th birthday party, played well by Christopher Plummer, Harlan sets the backdrop stage of his murder by confronting several members of his family of his intentions . . . i.e. cutting them off financially, threatening to rat out their cheating ways, firing them from the family business . . . So needless to say, no one was really in the mood to party hardy at Harlan's bash, and further needless to say, many were actually relieved when he woke up dead the very next day, before he could execute (get it,hahaha) his intentions. Or did he . . . dum,dum, duummmmmm

And it's dum,dum, duummmmmm not only but it's a whodunnit but also because our man Harlan built his life and family fortune writing murder mysteries. So, is this the old writer's last hurahhah, his final bow, his best ending . . . and why does he play? Interesting question without a doubt.

Shortly following the apparent suicide of the patriarch member of the Thromby family comes a southern-drawl totting private detective CSI Kentucky Fried Daniel Craig, in one of his most anti-James Bond character ever.

With the exception of one, each family member with a motive is questioned, though they argue their Daddy killed himself. And oddly but telling enough, none really seem to be mourning their Daddy and yet, oddly but telling even further, no one is questions why did Daddy kill himself. But the long and short reason is because they all have been circling the old man like sharks for a long, long time, just waiting. And now that he has died, they are ready and waiting with their hands out.

But the rest of the family and the movie continues . . . They bury their Daddy and everyone got out voted on inviting their father's South American nurse and kind companion, Marta, all the while waiting for their big pay day . . . and when the old man's final cut drops it leaves the family in an uproar.

But the game is still afoot and Kentucky Fried CSI is running out of time. Did Daddy kill himself? If not, then whodunnit? And how? And why? It's a mystery for our man to solve but someone is playing it false . . . someone is shifting about behind the detective's back . . . someone is playing a different game . . . AND THE KILLER IS… just kidding. You have to watch it to find out.

Having provided the premise, on to my Kitty Paws:
One Kitty Paw for Daniel Craig's performance. He didn't exactly steal the show but he did a good job of it and if we see future Det. CSI Kentucky Fried movies, I won't be surprised.
One Kitty for our hapless Marta. I liked her character. And frankly she was the only good person in that house anyways. The rest were greedy bastards.
One Kitty Paw for the ending . . . the final "got the killer" scene. Don't want to give anything away.
One Kitty Paw for the plot twist . . . again, there is more than meets the eye here but I don't want to give away the ending. You get fed a lot of information, so you can kinda figure out a few things but I certainly didn't figure everything out.

But . . . I have a few issues.

Issue #1: I really felt it was a bit long. They could have tightened it up a bit, like cut a few scenes, especially like the one I am referring to in Issue #2.
Issue#2: It get's political, real fast and really uncomfortable. Long and short of it, our hapless Marta is legal, but her mother is not. And when things go down, these @$$holes threaten our girl Marta with her mother's deportation. I mean, I get the set up but political issues in a murder mystery, come on, man . . .
Issue #3: I really, really struggled with a lot of other the characters. I don't do well with greedy, entitled people. I tried watching the Crown just recently and I had to turn it off because I was disgusted with the assumption of entitlement and privilege. I am soooooo over it.

But I don't necessarily want to take a while too many Kitty Paws, as looking past these issues, it is a good whoddunnit.

Chris Pummer looks great.
Jamie looked great.
Don looked great.
Toni had too much makeup.
The brown dye was terrible on Chris.
And I would have loved to have had an unblocked visual of the coffee cup, but everyone still gets her point.

So, at 3 Kitty Paws I do recommend Knives Out…. Come for the Daniel, ignore the political, and stay for the mystery . . . as the game is a foot while the plot thickens.

Dum, dum, dummmmmmmmmm

csk
My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part II~The Man Who Invent..
Board: Movie Moments
Dec 7, 2019 12:24pm
The Man Who Invented Christmas~ Christopher Plummer Part II

Released on November 10th, 2017, the Man Who Invented Christmas is the story of Charles Dickens's journey to writing the now well known and still very popular A Christmas Carol. I personally did not know about this movie and stumbled upon just recently thanks to an article regarding a list of the best Christmas movies. Being the curious kitty that I am, I decided to check it out.

The premise is as followed:

Having a failed American tour and three failed recently published novels, Dickens was scrambling to recover financial. In the mist of all of this, his wife is doing her own Victorian House pricey makeover, his financially irresponsible father shows up unannounced with his hand out for money and if that is not enough, his wife also announces that she is expecting their 5th child. Needless to say, Charlie is a bit strapped in more ways than one.

And if being financially strapped is a slight issue, suffering from a massive case of writer's block, is certainly a major issue.

During the course of the movie, he is starting to gather tidbits of quotes, story ideas and a development of characters from various places as he starts to come to terms with the horrible childhood memories brought forth by his father's untimely and unwanted arrival. In short, our Charlie feels responsible for his irresponsible father and is very resentful for it, which I think anyone who had to work the workhouses to pay off their father's debt at the age of 12 would feel.

Inspired by the idea that ghosts can interact with our world on Christmas Eve, a notion brought forth by an Irish house maid, a Hollywood fictional character no less, Charlie begins to string together the foundation of a ghost story regarding an old penny pincher miser. As Charlie learns to deal with his deep resentment, he also learns that Scrooge, the miser, is capable of learning and changing too.

Charlie, played well by Dan Stevens, the hottie from Beauty and the Beast and Downton Abbey is obviously our main character, full of emotion, running on imagination and talking to people only he can see. Behind him, and dragging Charlie along to deal with his own ghost is Mr. Scrooge played elegantly well by Christopher Plummer.

Having said more than enough, on to my Kitty Paws:
One Kitty Paw for Christopher Plummer. He is excellent as Mr. Scrooge.
One Kitty Paw for the Steven's and Plummer's interaction. They worked really well together.
One Kitty Paw for the reflection of a writer and apparently a factual event with Charles Dickens. Apparently Mr. Dickens would "see" and "talk" to his characters.( As a writer, I can certainly say that it really does happen. King Lucan from The Last Legend of Ireland was a very insistent that he have a bigger role in my novel than what I originally had planned. What can I say? The man is a jerk on and off the page.) But what I also loved about this fact is what movie does with this too. Cuz, my characters did it to me too.
One Kitty Paw because I enjoyed this movie.

But did he really invent Christmas?

Well, obviously, no.

To be fair, the concept of Christmas or the likings of it, has been around since the Pagan days of various countries, regions and areas. Naturally, over time, religion and changes in cultures altered it. In America, it has been said that Washington Irving "re-invent" it with his 1819 The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, gent., a series of stories about the celebration of Christmas in an English manor house-or invented several notions of it. This followed by C. Moore's classic poem, T'was the Night Before Christmas in 1822, which gave us the current American image of Santa.

So, then what did Dickens bring to the Christmas table in December of 1843? I argue that he actually says it via Jacob Marley with, "Mankind was my business".

British media at the time confirm that charitable donations did in fact go up after the release of A Christmas Carol. Charlie, unlike many other English writers, was from the poor working class. He understood the poor's struggle and in his life, he advocated to giving to the poor to help them out. He supported 43 charities, gave speeches as fundraisers for children's hospitals and silently funded widows and orphans. Granted the man was not a saint, but he did bring the plight of poor to light, and we still see his efforts today, 176 years later. That is pretty impressive.

But getting back to 2019, and Charlie's current version of his carol, my only slight-little struggly-thingy about this movie, and I seriously don't want to ruin it for anyone, and I do really hesitate to point this out, B. U. T. Dan Stevens looks like a young Willy Wonka with his wild hair and top hat.

Eitherway, if you are looking around, feeling the Christmas spirit (mind the pun) and wondering what Christmas movie to consider next, at 4 kitty Paws, I do highly recommend The Man Who Invented Christmas.

csk
Re: My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part I~ Knives Out
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981633 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 7, 2019 12:37pm
Thread
I loved Daniel Craig's kentucky fried southern role in Logan Lucky (I even made a letterbox series for Logan Lucky down in Charlotte, NC --Home of the Motor Speedway!) So I am looking forward to seeing this one for his fabulous Southern Drawl

-amanda from seattle
Re: My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part I~ Knives Out
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981633 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 7, 2019 7:48pm
Thread
I am excited to see the review. I LOVE a good mystery (without gore ). Excited to see this one!
Re: My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part I~ Knives Out
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981633 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 8, 2019 1:59pm
Thread
I enjoyed the movie very much!
Re: My Christopher Plummer Weekend~ Part I~ Knives Out
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #981658 by Yosemite MJD
Dec 9, 2019 8:54am
Thread
So did Red Fox and I -- we saw it a week ago.

The opening scene with a weird Gothic house surrounded by fog with two black dogs running was so cliché that I started laughing.

This is a classic whodunit with twists and turns but with tongue firmly in cheek! So the opening shot was supposed to be cliché and fun.

And it was FUN! I highly recommend seeing it!

KuKu
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Board: Movie Moments
Dec 26, 2019 9:58pm
Thread
Having heard that people and critics were complaining about this movie, I was extremely resistant to seeing it. Being honest, I love Stars Wars Rouge 1, A New Hope, Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi. I hate the first three (goddamn Jar-Jar Binks was just one of the many issues I had with them) and I was not a fan of The Force Awakes, kinda was okay with The Last Jedi, so needless to say, I was not looking forward to this . . . for various reasons.

The premise is as followed:

From the depths of death, a signal from the Emperor Palpatine has reached the First Order and Kylo Ren. Kylo seeks out the Emperor in a dark corner of the galaxy and learns the truth about Rey. The Emperor then instructs Kylo to kill Rey.

Meanwhile, Rey is being trained by General Leia, reaching out to the Jedi of the past, hoping to connect with them.

Then the Resistance receive word of the Emperor's return and with him, his planet killing fleet, the Final Order. Rey realizes that Luke was on the hunt for Emperor and gives them a start on where to look. The movie goes from there.

Having provided them premise, let's talk shop. Star Wars shop.

Okay, this story line is a bit of stretch, yes. The Emperor from the Return of the Jedi, returns . . . with a fleet he has been building . . . yeah, I agree . . .

However, the story also takes you back and pays homage to those who we loved and lost, and the reminds us once again the power of friendship and the power of HOPE.

Now I do not want to give away an spoilers but we already know a few things walking in. We can't pretend otherwise. But I am going to warn you something else happens and I almost got up and walked out. It was disturbing. I no longer trusted this movie. But I carried on. And so should you.

Having said way more than enough . . . on to my Kitty Paws:
One Kitty Paw because despite it's stretch of a storyline, it is very good.
One Kitty Paw because you will feel so many goddamn emotions . . . I am willing own two times that I cried. Okay three. Whatever, who's counting???
One Kitty Paw because it stays true to the Star Wars theme of unfailing friendship.
One Kitty Paw because it also stays true to the Star Wars theme of HOPE and fighting despite the odds.

As for the controversial lesbian kiss, first and foremost, if you blink you miss it. But . . . I am of the personal opinion that lesbians have been fighting and dying for this country, so bravo to Disney for having it.

csk
Re: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982002 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 26, 2019 11:04pm
Thread
One thing that made me emotional was seeing Princess Leia so much. Considering that Carrie Fisher is no longer alive --- and of course I had to project that onto my family with both my mom and dad dead now and how would I feel if I could just turn to a movie and see them alive and walking and talking any time I wanted. Would I want that? And then I kept thinking about one of the Black Mirror episodes where the girl has her boyfriend/husband cloned or whatever and then keeps him in the attic. And we do have a few videos where you can see my mom and dad (2, we have 2 videos) --I am also reminded of Starman where Karen Allen just sits and cries and watches videos of her wedding and then the alien comes in and looks just like her dead husband. So I had emotional things going on watching this movie that probably would not even register with other folks. Just because of the Carrie Fisher footage. I mean you can show ghostly other characters and those actors are still alive so no problem. And I thought the movie was just Meh.....I only went because some of my friends said, well you have to see it on the BIG SCREEN. And yeah as a film buff, you do have to see it on the BIG SCREEN. :-)

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982002 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 27, 2019 8:06pm
Thread
another comment about this movie....I assume that they are hoping to appeal to the next generation. However, the feedback that I have from my nieces and nephews who are in their 20's is that they think the movie "it is just okay" ... From friends that have younger children, people who are pre teens....... "it is okay" ...no one is raving about it being the best thing ever. Like I was when I was 10 years old and saw the first Star Wars. Just saying

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982033 by Amanda from Seattle
Dec 27, 2019 10:54pm
Thread
Yes, Carrie Fisher was hard to watch knowing that she has passed. Fans of Carries adored her. I adored her. I wanted to be Princess Leia like I am certain many other girls did. I was actually her once for Halloween. And wow, did she age gracefully. Carrie was simply beautiful. So, agreed, her death was definitely a blow to my childhood as well.

As I have mentioned before, I still remember waiting in line at the theater and being excited for Return of the Jedi. I loved the 3 original movies. Even my atlasquest banner is Star Wars themed.

As for me, and my family, we grew up on the original three. I made my children watch them and when the others came, we sat through them all, the good, the really bad and the Christ, was that ugly.

As I stated in my review, this movie definitely pays homage to those we loved and lost and otherwise. I, having been a fan for so long, appreciated that. Maybe that really did not appeal to those who came after our 80's generation. I can only speculate.

As for
From friends that have younger children, people who are pre teens....... "it is okay" ...no one is raving about it being the best thing ever.

Again, I don't know what to say because:

1) When the movie ended, people who were in the audience applauded.
and
2) My 16 yo son was in the audience and when I asked him later, he texted, saying "I really really liked it. I thought it was great." and then he followed with up a text saying "all the emotions man." And this from my 16 year old who hates having feelings and hates expressing them even more! LOL

Star War movies has been around since 1977 and after 43 years, there is definitely bound to be some differing opinions about them.

csk
Re: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982038 by Captain Slick Kitty
Dec 28, 2019 4:16pm
Thread
My 13-year-olds loved it.
Two Popes
Board: Movie Moments
Dec 29, 2019 11:42pm
Currently blowing up Netflix is Two Popes. A completely fictional story of an meeting and an eventual understand and possible friendship between Pope Benedict the XVI and Cardinal Bergoglio, the future Pope Francis.

Directed by Frernando Meirelles, the premise is as followed:

Opening to a phone call from Pope Francis, wanting to buy plane tickets, the movie moves to the dire streets of Argentina, Cardinal Bergoglio holds mass. Funny enough, he is talking about building a church with stone. (More about this latter) After greeting some of his parishioners, he learns that the beloved Pope John Paul II has died.
The movie goes on to show the voting of Pope Benedict the XVI and how Benedict is not a fan of Cardinal Bergoglio.

Fast forward to 2012, when just as Cardinal Bergoglio was complaining that two of his letters to Pope Benedict goes unanswered, Pope Benedict summons Cardinal Bergoglio to his summer home at Castle Gandolfo. And there begins their conversation regarding their beliefs regarding the Catholic Church, or I should say, their opposing beliefs regarding the Catholic Church. While Cardinal Bergoglio is explaining his side of things, he then explains his reasons for meeting with the Pope; he wants to retire and needs Benedict to sign off on his retire paperwork. Benedict repeatedly blows him off and together they make their way to Rome, for Benedict to deal with scandals and for Cardinal Bergoglio to freely walk about Rome, hearing some unfavorable things about Benedict.

Then the moment of truth comes and Benedict comes clean about his reasons for summoning Cardinal Bergoglio: HE wishes to resign and suggests to Cardinal Bergoglio that he take the papal reins.

Immediately Cardinal Bergoglio refuses providing the Pope with his own dark sins regarding the Argentinean dictatorship in the 1970s.

Having provided the premise, on to my Kitty Paws:

One Kitty Paw because I actually enjoyed this movie, and no, it has nothing to do with me being Catholic.

One Kitty Paw because I felt like I saw them as actual people, not just priests on a pedal stool. Did you know Benedict played the piano and actually produced an album? I didn’t.

One Kitty Paw for the awesome performance of Jonathon Pryce. Portraying the light hearted Cardinal Bergoglio mostly throughout the movie, you like him and when he shares his dark secret, you are conflicted.

One Kitty Paw for the dramatic Anthony Perkins. His portrayal of the stubborn Pope and his personal understanding of what needs to be done to save the Catholic Church is pretty good.

Now as I have said, this movie is based on a completely fictional weekend of these two men. It never happened. However, what I leave with is something I did not realize before.

As I said in the beginning, as Cardinal Bergoglio, Pope Francis is talking to his masses about building a church with stone. Which is funny because in the story of Saint Francis, God tells Francis to "rebuild my church" but God meant to rebuild it spiritually, which St. Francis does, and I truly believe that the two unrelated men have become one. A real, current one.

Under Benedict's papal rein, many left the Catholic Church. But now, with Francis, a man who appeals to the spirit of the people, seems to rebuilding how the Catholic Church deals with certain topics, like divorce, homosexuality, even giving (with a serious nod to St. Francis, the patron saint of animals) animals souls and acknowledging that they can go to heaven too. I mean, folks, this is big!

But I digress. Forgive me and my pun. LOL.

If you are intrigued, whether you are Catholic or not, at 4 Kitty Paws, I do recommend Two Popes.

csk
30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Jan 20, 2020 6:46pm
Thread
Yesterday, 30 years ago, January 19th, 1990, a great future American Cult Classic was released into theaters. It was not a runaway hit until it went to VHS rentals. Remember those???? VHS rentals. Like it was yesterday. HA!

Anyhoooo....in mist of it's rental release, it became one of the most rented moves in 1990 and it's VHS sales went through the roof. So much so, it spawned a huge cult following that lead to 5, count that five, sequels. All this must have been a huge shock to star Kevin Bacon who felt that making this movie was the lowest point of his career.

The premise is as followed:

In the middle of absolutely nowhere, Perfection, NV, lives 14 people. There are Val and Earl, "we are han-dy men, Earl! Han-dy men!" Mindy and her clay wielding mom, Nancy, Nestor, a drunk, Melvin, the obxious teenager, Miguel, the local ranger, Walter Chang, the local merchant owner, Heather and Burt Gunner, married doomsday preppers before that was a thing, Edgar the town drunk, the doctor and his wife, and Old Fred the farmer.

New to the area is Rhonda Le Beck, who will have long blond hair, big green eyes, world class breasts, a$$ that won't quick and legs that go all the way up . . . only she doesn't. She has a college education, thinks quick on her feet and summons her courage like damn lioness.

Just as Val and Earl have had enough of living in Perfect, they decide to leave the small town in their dust and head for Bixby permant. Only, as they start their leave they keep coming across dead community members, completely unaware of the monsters in the valley . . . cuz they "decided to leave just one damn day too late".

Having said more than enough, on to my Kitty Paws:
One Kitty Paw because after 30 years, it still has "it"! And hence that is why it is considered a "cult classic." It's funny. It's scary. But it's not bloody gory.
One Kitty Paw because it has great-cheesy one liners! "Broke into the wrong goddamn rec room, didn't you, you bastard!" I probably can recite this entire movie.
One Kitty Paw because you will never walk on "pleistocene alluvials" . . . loose soil again without thinking of the graboids and where the nearest "residual boulders" are. Now, that's a classic.
One half Kitty Paw because while there is swearing, there is no adult related scenes and the swearing pales to the crap Netflix puts out anyways.

So, if you have never seen or haven't seen it a very long time, pop the popcorn, grab the teenagers and grandma (cuz she was there for it's original release) and settle in without making any vibrations. At 3.5 Kitty Paws, I highly recommend this cult classic. It and all of it's sequels are on Netflix.

csk
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982718 by Captain Slick Kitty
Jan 20, 2020 7:33pm
Thread
In the middle of absolutely nowhere, Perfect, NV

Perfection, Nevada.

Been there. Done that. Nothing of interest since paleohistory.
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982718 by Captain Slick Kitty
Jan 21, 2020 2:47pm
Thread
My daughter and I watch this ALL THE TIME on our movie night. If we're watching it at my house, my husband will come in and say "Are you watching worms again?" I love-love-love Burt. He is so funny. We laugh ourselves silly.
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982732 by Topcollector
Jan 21, 2020 3:39pm
Thread
I actually believe sequel #2 is pretty alright. I can probably recite this movie by heart too.

Best line ever, Burt : "I feel I was denied need to know information!"

Second best, Gradey: "Did you check all your pockets!?!?"

I actually say these lines in my real world.

Csk
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982733 by Captain Slick Kitty
Jan 21, 2020 3:45pm
Thread
Don't forget about the short lived tv series Tremors. It kept me entertained so I liked it.
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982733 by Captain Slick Kitty
Jan 21, 2020 4:22pm
Thread
I feel I was denied need to know information!

This is our favorite quote. We wait for this scene to say it with him--and the one where he shoots the hole through the car.
Re: 30 Years ago and A Day: Tremors
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #982734 by Don't Panic
Jan 21, 2020 4:23pm
Thread
I never knew about it.
The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Apr 1, 2020 9:52am
Thread
Recently I joined a Mel Brooks Facebook group. Talk about a lot of Mel Brooks . . . Oi vey!. Anyhooo . . . I know I mentioned before that thank the Universe that Blazing Saddles was made when it was made and it’s still available for people to see and understand it’s message, one that I would argue is extremely valuable and relevant today as we hold our breaths for this pandemic pass.

But I digress. Many of the people in this group love the 1967 movie The Producers. Starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder (in his first but certainly not last Mel Brooks casting), the movie is as followed:

While auditing the books of shady McShadester Max Bialystock, Leo Bloom, our novice Wilder, tells Max that he would be better off making a play that was flop instead of making a play that was a success. Enamored with this idea, Max realizes that he is going to need Leo’s help so he set outs to convince Leo. Once Leo agrees, Max does everything he can to produce a sinking play, this includes finding the worst play, ahem, Springtime for Hitler, the worst director to direct (Christopher Hewett, to us 80’s kids, Mr. Believader) and the worst actor to play Hitler, a rather entrenched 60’s hippy actor portrayed by an exceedingly well Dick Swan.
Then they wait for the opening night crowd to turn on them. Only, thanks to the entrenched 60’s hippy, the audience ends up loving it and suddenly they have a hit play on their hands.

Now, this movie, written and directed by Mel Brooks came out in 1967, a mere 22 years after WWII ended. Nothing about Hitler or the Nazi Party should have been taken lightly then and certainly nothing about Hitler and the Nazi should be taken lightly now, 75 years later. This I believe. But Mel Brooks, being a Jewish, and having fought in WWII, wanted to make Hitler a laughing stock. I can understand this. There are some people who believe in our family who believe we are Jewish (on my mother’s side) but I certainly was not raised in the Jewish culture, and I certainly did not fight in WWII, so clearly Brooks and I have differing approaches to Hitler. And oddly enough, it works in his movie The Producers.

Having said more than enough, on to my Kitty Paws:

One Kitty Paw for Gene Wilder. Wow! What an excellent performance! The man actually turns purple in one scene. He was nominated for Best Supporting Actor. He did not win but he certainly, certainly, certainly deserved the nomination.

One Kitty Paw for Dick Shaw. He plays Hitler with this dangling solo earring and nails the 60’s hippy jive to a “T”. The man even wears a can of Campbell Soup while singing a song about “Flower Power”.

(I feel like I am making this stuff up, but I am not!)

One Kitty Paw for it’s outlandish-ness that seems to work. I don’t know how to explain it. I mean seriously, a movie about a play about Hitler. Ummm… but it works???? Yeah.

One Kitty Paw for the small part people. I don’t know how Mel Brooks did it but even the small parts elevate the movie, like Christopher Hewett.

Now granted, oddly enough, the Swedish Secretary . . . yeah. Okay. (And, yes, I can’t believe I am saying okay to Hitler, but slightly cringing at the Swedish dancing, pointy boobs secretary. Yeah, that’s the power of Mel Brooks, folks.) But Ulla, yeah, okay, pushing the envelope, yes, especially with Max calling her his “Toy” . . . yeah, okay, it makes a college educated, home owning, mom, letterboxer, self published author crinkle her left eye a bit, yes, but moving past that (especially since some movies have subjected women far worse, and to be fair, I understand in the 2007 version, her role is altered to a less subjected role), even she holds a reflective value. A fat, rich man hiring a pretty girl who can’t really do anything just so he oogle her, is a waste of money and a reflection of what kind of pig he is.

And I chuckle as I type this. I chuckle because the audience’s initial response in the movie, to the play, is what I initially imagined some people’s real reaction to the movie was like. All shock and no awe. In fact, Brooks shared how one man who had seen the Broadway version of the movie confronted Brooks, telling him “how dare you! I was in World War II!” to which Brooks replied, “So was I! But I didn’t see you there!”

But that’s a classic Mel comeback. “But I didn’t see you there”, like it only happened in one small place.

Anyhooo…. I have not seen the remake with Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick. But for the 1967 version, at 4 Kitty Paws, I highly recommend it.

csk
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985200 by Captain Slick Kitty
Apr 1, 2020 4:19pm
Thread
I agree with everything you say of the 1967 version. The role of Ulla is a bit cringeworthy in spots but it's still a masterpiece. I own it and the more recent version on DVD. I love them both. Matthew Broderick does a respectable turn as Leo Blum. They've messed with the plot a bit but it was Mel Brooks messing with his own plot so that's fine.

Christopher Hewett was sublime in the original, as was Dick Shawn. Solid funny movie all around.

Thanks for publishing your take on it.
Knit wit
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985230 by knit wit
Apr 2, 2020 6:04am
Thread
Have you seen Jo Jo Rabbit yet? There is a goofy Hitler in that one too.

Amanda from Seattle
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985250 by Amanda from Seattle
Apr 2, 2020 1:10pm
Thread
Yeah. I wasn't sure how I felt about goofy Hitler. :-)
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985276 by knit wit
Apr 2, 2020 1:30pm
Thread
"Yeah. I wasn't sure how I felt about goofy Hitler. :-)"

-me either. A lot of the movie I did not get...or it did not sit well with me. Over all, by the end, yeah, it was okay....but lots of it bothered me and not in the "I am bothered by WWII and the horrors of war" way, but in the "I am bothered with how they are portraying this" way.

Does that make sense?

Amanda from Seattle
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985279 by Amanda from Seattle
Apr 2, 2020 1:53pm
Thread
There’s a strange black comedy from a couple of years ago called ‘The Death of Stalin’ staring Steve Buscemi about people scrambling for power when he died. Buscemi is a favorite of mine.

It is very weirdly funny. Stalin was a monster but the film is kind of hilarious.

Haven’t seen Jojo Rabbit yet. It’s on the list.
Re: The Producers 1967
Board: Movie Moments
Reply to: #985279 by Amanda from Seattle
Apr 2, 2020 7:26pm
Thread
"Yeah. I wasn't sure how I felt about goofy Hitler. :-)"

-me either. A lot of the movie I did not get...or it did not sit well with me.

A lot of Jews have portrayed Nazis.

There are several portrayals of Hitler on Hogan's Heroes.