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Read Board: Reading Room

Welcome to the Reading Room!
Board: Reading Room
Oct 31, 2004 9:13pm
For those of you who like to curl up with a good book, this is the place for you. It's essentially a book club for letterboxers. Discuss your favorite books, authors, or the latest bestsellers!
John Bellairs Children's Books
Board: Reading Room
Nov 1, 2004 9:39am
Thread
Forget Lemony Snicket! These are the true "Letterboxing" books for children. John Bellairs has been called the Stephen King of juvenilte fiction and these books are wonderfully creepy! The Curse of the Blue Figurine features a BOOK that is actually a BOX! (reminded me of some letterboxes that I have found) Also, at the climax of the book, they are in Franconia Notch, NH! The White Mountains! WOW Someone really needs to hide a Blue Figurine Letterbox up that way.

Another Bellairs book, The Treasure of Alpheus Winterborn has the hero solving a mysterious message to find a treasure! (Sounds an awful lot like letterboxing to me!) See if you can figure it out!

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: John Bellairs Children's Books
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #333 by Amanda from Seattle
Nov 11, 2004 5:00am
Thread
Hi Amanda,

Was wondering if you can tell me what age group these books target. Our daughter loves to read and loves letterboxing. Perhaps I should hunt these books down for her.

Thanks for the tip. The more I think about it, I might have to get them for me to read ;o)

Silly ol Bear
of Red's Bunch
A real life treasure hunt
Board: Reading Room
Nov 11, 2004 7:59am
Thread
Here is an interesting website with a real treasure hunt for gold tokens hidden around the country! Check it out!

www.atreasurestrove.com

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: John Bellairs Children's Books
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #630 by Silly Ol Bear
Nov 11, 2004 8:07am
Thread
I think they are for about 3rd/4th grade. The characters are 11-13, I think. I think they are much better than the "Goosebumps" books that were so popular a couple of years ago with this age group. Plus, I also think they are books that would appeal to the adult reader as well, so you can share the experience, talk about the books together, etc.
--Amanda
Re: John Bellairs Children's Books
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #633 by Amanda from Seattle
Nov 11, 2004 9:14am
Thread
Thanks for the info. Will have to get her some. She is in the 4th grade (9 yrs old). So they will be perfect.

Thanks again for the book suggestion. Santa's can cross one kid off the list ;o)

Silly ol Bear
Investigative Report!
Board: Reading Room
Nov 27, 2004 4:18pm
Thread
I went to the grocery store today, and started reading some of the labels on the food products. Because, why not? (Thus, the connection to reading--in case you were wondering!)

How screwed up is this:

Regular eggnog: 180 calories per serving
Low-fat eggnog: 120 calories per serving
Non-fat eggnog: 210 calories per serving

This investigative report was brought you to EXCLUSIVE from Atlas Quest! =)

-- Ryan
So, what are you reading now?
Board: Reading Room
Nov 27, 2004 8:58pm
Thread
(other than the boards, of course!) ;)
And what do you think of it?

I am currently reading "The Maurititus Command" by Patrick O'Brian. It is a book from his Aubrey/Maturin series, which is what the movie "Master and Commander" is based on. They are GREAT books! Billy started reading them because he enjoyed the movie so much and he got me hooked, too. They are supremely well-written in my opinion, though I have to keep some reference books handy- there are a ton of sailing terms that I'm not familiar with, and the language is period so it takes some getting used to. Don't let that scare you, though- the stories are great! And there are a bunch of them. :)

Before these I read "The Davinci Code" which was fast-paced and interesting, and "Life of Pi" which was a very well-told yarn with musings on religion, philosophy and zoology- engaging, fun and thought-provoking too.

So, those are my most recent reads. What about you?
-KitCat
Re: So, what are you reading now?/Master and Commander
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1086 by KitCat
Nov 28, 2004 4:49pm
Thread
If you like the Patrick O'Brian Books, you might want to read Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall (Plus two other books by these gentleman, Men Against the Sea and Pitcairn's Island). I read this one when I was in high school and absolutely loved it!
Another terrific book about adventure at sea is Dove by Robin Lee Graham. Robin sailed around the world on a tiny sailboat when he was only 16 years old! It is a true story. He was featured in National Geographic at the time (1968-1969).

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: So, what are you reading now?/Master and Commander
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1097 by Amanda from Seattle
Nov 28, 2004 5:06pm
Thread
I remember that Nat Geographic article well, as a matter of fact! (Though it must have been an old issue I was reading, I'll admit). What a great story it is. Thanks for the recommendations!
Outlander and more by Diana Gabaldon
Board: Reading Room
Nov 28, 2004 5:10pm
Thread
Well, I will have to plug some of my all time favorite books ever. The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon. It is really hard to pin down what kind of book this is...It has time-travel, romance, history and adventure etc. Ms. Gabaldon is a terrific writer. These books are very long (900-1000 pages). But I have friends who NEVER read who have started them and cannot put them down until they finish every single word.

I often visit this website to chat about the books with other fans.
http://www.lallybroch.com/
I even took a trip to Scotland to visit sites from the books that was arranged through the Ladies of Lallybroch website.

The books follow the adventures of Claire and Jamie. Claire is hurtled through time by being in a ring of standing stones at the wrong time (or the right time! depending on your point of view). She meets Jamie who is a Scots warrior during the 1740's. They fall in love, there is a war on in Scotland, etc etc. My favorite book is the third, Voyager, where they flee Scotland and immigrate to the US. The entire 1050 page book takes place in the span of about 3 months time! It is a whirlwind of activity and adventure.

Once in the states, (well, it's really the new world--no states YET) They settle in the area that will be North Carolina (Drums of Autumn and Fiery Cross- books 4 and 5)

Ryan had read these books before he ever met me. He had stumbled upon them at the library. So that was definitely one of the things that endeared him to me when we first met! I have also been to several events where Diana read excepts from her books and did book signings! So I am a huge fan! But I highly recommend these books to anyone who wants to really sink their teeth into a fun story.

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: So, what are you reading now?
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1086 by KitCat
Nov 28, 2004 5:20pm
Thread
I am currently reading Dick Francis Mysteries. Dick Francis writes murder mysteries that concern or are set in the world of horse racing in Europe. They are very entertaining and easy to read.

I also just finished Reefer Madness by Eric Schlosser. This is the same guy who wrote Fast Food Nation (which I also recommend). Reefer Madness concerns Sex, Drugs and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market. It is actually a collection of 3 different essays on marijuana, illegal immigrant labor and the porn industry in America.

-Amanda from Seattle
When you spend 5 hours crossing the country every other day plus untold hours in holding patterns and waiting around in airports, you tend to read a lot. :-)
Re: So, what are you reading now?
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1102 by Amanda from Seattle
Nov 28, 2004 6:29pm
Thread
I really enjoy the Dick Francis mysteries! I'm a big fan of mystery novels. My current favorite mystery novels are the Richard Jury series by Martha Grimes.

Eric Schlosser's books are on my to-read list. I'm glad to hear you enjoyed them!
Re: Outlander and more by Diana Gabaldon
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1099 by Amanda from Seattle
Nov 28, 2004 8:29pm
Thread
Amanda, YES!!!!! I was introduced to these - oh, it must've been almost two years ago - and they're SO fabulous!! Outlander itself is my favorite of the series. I love that Gabaldon isn't afraid to get into the nitty gritty details of life - both the positive & negatives, you know?

I still haven't read The Fiery Cross, because it hasn't come out in the size paperback I buy...I don't want to read it until I own it....that new book smell & all.

I was not able to put these down, either. It's a darn good thing I was pregnant and close to bedrest at the time...only one kid to look after! ;)

I'm impressed at your level of devotion. I've only really been to Edinburgh, and not for long (plus, it was years ago). I'd love to go back and explore.

Lady Buzz
Just finished Evanovich's latest...
Board: Reading Room
Nov 28, 2004 8:34pm
Thread
"Ten Big Ones" by Janet Evanovich

I've only read a couple of her Stephanie Plum books...her style of writing always takes me a few chapters to get used to for some reason, but the stories are compelling enough to keep me reading. MIL gave me this one last week, and it makes nice, low-thought reading before bed.

LB
Re: Just finished Evanovich's latest...
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1118 by Lady Buzz
Nov 28, 2004 8:42pm
Thread
I absolutely loved her first book. Witty, new, and interesting. But I think these stories are starting to get a little stale now, and each new book I enjoy less than the previous one.

I also checked out Full House, I think it was called, but it just seemed like Stephanie Plum with a different name, and not nearly as well-written and thought out as the Stephanie Plum books. Seems more like cheap knock offs, really, although I know the original books pre-date the Stephanie Plum ones.

I had a lot of fun telling people while hiking the AT that everything I knew about New Jersery I learned from Stephanie Plum novels, but oddly, nobody I talked to from New Jersey had actually read the books, so the joke kind of fell flat. =)

-- Ryan
Re: Just finished Evanovich's latest...
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1120 by Green Tortuga
Nov 29, 2004 4:58am
Thread
I absolutely loved her first book. Witty, new, and interesting. But I think these stories are starting to get a little stale now, and each new book I enjoy less than the previous one.

I agree. I just finished reading her latest Metro Girl. New character, same style. It was pretty good for light reading. I guess there is only so many Plum stories left in her, and she is branching off onto a new character.

sweetiesmom
Re: Just finished Evanovich's latest...
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1127 by sweetiesmom
Nov 29, 2004 11:07am
Thread
Yes, Stephanie's getting a little weak...she either needs to marry Morelli, dump him and move into the bat cave, or leave Jersey altogether.

I learned everything I know about NJ from those books, too! (Okay, except that the Short Hills Mall is right next to the Prudential building in Newark. Guess who I made a lot of travel arrangements for a few years ago? LOL)
Re: Just finished Evanovich's latest...
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1132 by Lady Buzz
Nov 30, 2004 12:55am
Thread
I bought Evanovich's original Harlequin romances on ebay a year ago or so. She started out writing for Harlequin before she broke into the mystery businesss. The Full Throttle, Full Tilt books etc are alot like her old stuff. I do think it must be hard for authors to live up to their own success.

Patricia Cornwell is like that for me. I really enjoyed her early books, but lately they are just Blah.

Be sure to check out Nevada Barr. All of her mysteries are set in National Parks. (I think I used a book of hers in a mystery clue I have somewhere...:-)

--Amanda
Re: Outlander and more by Diana Gabaldon
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1117 by Lady Buzz
Nov 30, 2004 1:15am
Thread
The trip to Scotland was terrific. We went to Culloden and saw the battlefield, which was really neat. We went to the World's End Pub in Edinburgh where they go in one of the books! It is still there after more than 300 years! Amazing! ( I just love Europe that way. ) We did Loch Ness and St. Andrews etc. We were on a bus tour, but with 20 or so other people who were all crazy about the books, so we talked about Jamie and Claire the whole time. It was really neat.
I also have the Outlandish Companion in which you get alot of great information about everybody in the books. Family Trees and such. And maps of where all the action takes place. Very informative. Gets rid of some of the confusion with the time travel etc.
I have also read the Lord John mystery (I actually got it at the library, didn't buy it<Lord John and the Private Matter>....and I got the audio book --again at the library--of another Lord John mystery<Hellfire>) They are pretty good. But I really want to know more about Claire and Jamie, in fact, Ryan and I were both a little disappointed with Fiery Cross because it concentrated alot on Brianna and Roger and not so much on Claire and Jamie.

-Amanda
Re: A real life treasure hunt
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #632 by Amanda from Seattle
Dec 21, 2004 8:04am
Thread
I just saw the author on the Today Show with these jewels (which are what you get when you find a coin.) Wow! They are gorgeous.

All I can say is, a letterboxer had better find at least one of these! I'm thinking of a few great puzzle-boxers who might be able to do it - though they'd have to reveal their identity in the end - and make themselves available for public appearances. (Though I suppose they don't have to admit they're letterboxers. =)

I read all the fine print on the website - looks like residents of the US letterboxing capital are out. You can't win if you're a resident of CT, or three other nearby states (can't remember which ones.) Wonder why?

Grifos
Re: A real life treasure hunt
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #632 by Amanda from Seattle
Dec 30, 2004 7:51pm
Thread
Quote Here is an interesting website with a real treasure hunt for gold tokens hidden around the country!


I put this as a link on the main homepage of Atlas Quest a few days ago. So far, one person even bought a copy! =) Don't know who, but if you win the prize, let everyone know you got your copy though Atlas Quest. ;o)

I'm itching to check out the book myself, but I'm too cheap to buy it. I'll have to find a copy at a library somewhere. Hmmm....

-- Ryan
The Path Between the Seas
Board: Reading Room
Dec 30, 2004 8:04pm
Since Amanda and I--if all goes well--are planning to head off to Panama for some sun and fun (and too see a total solar eclipse) in April, I decided it was time I learned more about this fine Central American country.

Found this book by David McCullough (who also write Truman, another fine book I've never read) about the building of the Panama Canal, and it's absolutely FASCINATING! I love history, and this book is bursting with it. It's got everything: Scandals, deaths, vision, triumph, and failures. So far, no sex or drugs, but I've only made it through the first 150 pages so far. =)

Two things I've learned that I had no idea about before--before Panama became an independent country, it used to be a part of Columbia! And the building of the canal helped split the country in two--figuratively and literally.

And the other thing I learned--there was some serious debate about whether the canal between the Pacific and Atlantic should be built through Nicaragua or Panama. Nicaragua?! It never even occurred to me that that would be a viable option. On a map, Panama seems like the obvious place for a canal--that's where the two oceans come closest together. But for a variety of reasons, Nicaragua was thought to be the faster, cheaper way to create a canal between the seas by many people. And almost ALL the engineers who knew what they were talking about were for putting it through Nicaragua. How different Central American history may have turned out had they had their way.

And the French--oh, those poor, sorry dolts. *shaking head* They were going to build a sea-level canal through Pamana. Imagine the effort that would have required. *shaking head* Well, the French failed and Americans picked up the effort with a bit more reasonable of a plan.

Anyway, I was excited to go to Panama before, but now it's just killing me that I have to wait until April. I want to see all the areas discussed in this book. Walk through the streets of Panama City and Colon. Check out the canal and the terrain around it. *sigh*

Well, back to reading.... Let's see what happens next! =)

-- Ryan
Library Letterboxing
Board: Reading Room
Jan 1, 2005 6:12pm
Thread
Hello out there. I am fairly new to Atlas quest. I don't know if this questions has be addressed, but I thought this "reading room" would be the best place to post and ask. For most people who read go to the Library.

Does anyone out there know anything about Library Letterboxing. You know for people who live up North and need to hibernate during the Months of Dec. through March. I found somewhere that you should look for the box under the library number 796.14 or 769.51? Well I know that my Library doesn't participate but has agreed to let me open one and they would let me keep it there.

Does anyone one have a Library Box. And what and how do I prepare it?

Kelmark Boxer
Re: Library Letterboxing
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1543 by Kelmark Boxer
Jan 2, 2005 10:59am
Thread
E-mail me off list I have info for you about Library Box's. But don't want to post it to the list because it would be a spoiler.

Cherokee Rose
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
Board: Reading Room
Jan 3, 2005 7:56pm
Thread
I just finished reading "Wicked, The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" last night. Excellent book, especially for fans of the Wizard of Oz, even though it turns Oz on its head! Can you imagine letterboxing through Munchkinland, along the Yellow Brick Road and into the Emerald City??...obsessed? Who, me??
Artdog
Re: Wicked by Gregory Maguire
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1591 by Artdog
Jan 3, 2005 8:19pm
Thread
I believe that is the book that the Broadway Play Wicked is based on. It has been getting terrific reviews in NYC! It was playing when Ryan and I were there in September, but it was so popular, we couldn't get tickets.

-Amanda from Seattle
Re: Wicked by Gregory Maguire
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1592 by Amanda from Seattle
Jan 4, 2005 5:01am
Thread
"I believe that is the book that the Broadway Play Wicked is based on. "

Yes, it is. It is playing in Chicago now and my bookclub is thinking about taking the train up (from Indy) and attending the show together after we've all finished the book.

-Artdog
Re: Wicked by Gregory Maguire
Board: Reading Room
Reply to: #1594 by Artdog
Jan 4, 2005 8:24am
Thread
Read the book & saw the show. Both are fantastic but are totally different! The book is much darker & the musical is much more what you'd expect from a musical that is supposed to lead up to the Wizard of Oz- upbeat, fantastic tale, but very different from the book. Even the story is different. So, while it is based on the book, it is very loosely based. But it is fantastic in its own right & there are things about each that I enjoyed & often I wondered which story version I enjoyed more. You'll have to decide for yourself. :)

The Family
The Dogs of Babel
Board: Reading Room
Jan 8, 2005 11:50am
Thread
I am almost finished with this book written by Carolyn Parkhurst. It was recommended by a co-worker at the vet the clinic I manage...I guess we'll read anything to do with dogs and cats:) Anyway, very good story with two great characters (three if you count Lorelei, their Rhodesian Ridgeback) with lots of emotional twists and turns.
Artdog