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Solution for the back of Tan-Z
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 9, 2018 11:25am
Over in this thread (https://www.atlasquest.com/boards/messages.php?startId=968961;threadId=140760) there was talk of the pebble texture on the back of Tan-Z and how it could be removed so both sides were usable for carving.

There was also the suggestion for using the pebble texture for ‘shading’ which I found interesting. This morning I was test printing the back (it’s got promise!). But so as not to get ink all over myself when using the front, I took a paper towel and some acetone to clean off the residue ink.

And I discovered that with a light scrubbing the pebble texture came off and left the surface as smooth as the “front” side! No slicing, no chopping, no sanding needed! I’m guessing for larger areas you might want to use a block or something to keep the surface level but the solution to getting the back carvable proved to be pretty simple.
Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 15, 2018 9:00pm
Thread
This is a bit more involved than the processes I use but I think the attention to detail is something I could definitely learn from.

https://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/linocut-carving-and-printing-by-maarit-hanninen
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 16, 2018 8:52am
Thread
This is just my thoughts on the first video, and then the second one that was a two-color print. Take this from someone who is not as good at carving as her, but I know enough to appreciate her skill.

What immediately struck me was that the work of an artist from the Netherlands had a soundtrack in Spanish. It is a lovely language, but I was wondering why they didn't use a local artist singing in Dutch.

And at the end, she titles her work "Tomorrow, Tomorrow", in English. What a cosmopolitan world we've become.

Then I was wondering why she used so much water. She soaked the paper in water, mostly dried it then did a print. After printing she sprayed and pressed the paper to dry it out again. Then she signed them in pencil, rather than ink. Curious.

I also noticed the way she did the pencil transfer. Why make your own carbon paper rather than buy some? Is carbon paper so far from common memory that people don't know about it, or is it just not available there?

I then watched the video on the two-color printing. It was neat how she did the transfer for the second color. I'd like to (someday) try a multi-color print. I've done one, but it was a large stamp (about 3" by 2") with a small portion (about 1" by ¾") that was a second color, so I don't really count that.

She also carved out large areas with a gouge. Instead of carving out strips, she carved out combs then finished by carving out the connected area. I've done that sometimes, but with only a few (3-5) teeth.

Very interesting and relaxing carving videos. They were lovely prints too.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969443 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 16, 2018 11:46am
Thread
I agree it's a very soothing video to watch. Thanks to lonnewsom for linking to it!

But I was also confused by some of her methodologies.
I also noticed the way she did the pencil transfer. Why make your own carbon paper rather than buy some? Is carbon paper so far from common memory that people don't know about it, or is it just not available there?

Dick Blick sells it (along with many other places) and ships internationally. But I'm not sure why it's needed in the first place. I carved a bit of linoleum for a more durable sig stamp and acetone transferred it just fine. I'm guessing that would also eliminated the need for painting the surface red (and why not white?).

Then I was wondering why she used so much water. She soaked the paper in water, mostly dried it then did a print.

I'm pretty sure that's left over from an Intaglio (printmaking) process she used to use. In that process, the ink is down in grooves (as opposed to being on a raised surface). The paper must be malleable enough to be forced down into the groves, hence the soaking. Here's an engraving I did years ago, you can see around the edges of the print itself how the press indented the paper.

It also shows signing the print in pencil which is the traditional way is to sign and number art prints. Also, a pencil mark cannot be easily reproduced by computers, making it less vulnerable to fraud.

DZ
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969443 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 16, 2018 2:20pm
Thread
I tried using graphite paper on linoleum recently and it did not transfer at all. Is that why she sanded the lino first? Is that common practice?
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969447 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 16, 2018 3:42pm
Thread
I'm pretty sure that's left over from an Intaglio (printmaking) process she used to use.

On this link you provided, I noticed an example used on currency. Getting (slightly) off topic, I am in awe at the type of skill it takes to carve at that scale. Or, do they use computers to do it now days? Then I am in awe of how they did it "back in the day" when they had to do it by hand.

It also shows signing the print in pencil which is the traditional way is to sign and number art prints. [...] making it less vulnerable to fraud.

That is something I didn't know. Thanks for telling me (and others) about this.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969450 by InkTap
Dec 16, 2018 4:37pm
Thread
I tried using graphite paper on linoleum recently and it did not transfer at all. Is that why she sanded the lino first? Is that common practice?

I have very limited experience with linoleum, but I’d wager that if graphite doesn’t transfer to it well then that’s the reason for the paint. She probably sanded it first to get the paint to adhere to it.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969447 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 16, 2018 9:52pm
Thread
I attended an art class a couple years ago and that's how they had us transfer the images--by coloring the back instead of tracing first and just flipping it over and transferring it. With carbon paper I would think there would be movement during the transfer process. I used carbon paper at work for 10-15 years before we got copiers and lift-off tape so we didn't have to pray we didn't make a typo or have to re-type the whole thing. Oh, remember onion skin copies--yuk.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969464 by Topcollector
Dec 16, 2018 10:40pm
Thread
... that's how they had us transfer the images--by coloring the back instead of tracing first and just flipping it over and transferring it. With carbon paper I would think there would be movement during the transfer process.

There might be but it doesn’t matter. I used to work at a commercial art studio. One of my jobs was transferring drawings by the artist. As long as the original (top) drawing is taped down securely it doesn’t matter if there is movement of the carbon paper, the transfer will be registered properly. It’s only the top drawing that matters regardless of which process you use.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 17, 2018 10:20am
Thread
Thanks, I intend to get into this. There are several mediums for prints.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 17, 2018 1:27pm
Thread
I've never really understood the difference between making a 'print' and what we do with ink. Is it the type of paper they use, the size of the image (I notice these are always large pictures), the longevity? I tried doing a print LTC once with paint and it was really hard. Maybe if I had dipped my paper in water like she did it wouldn't have stuck so much. I really didn't see that much difference in the results other than there was a raised image.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969485 by Topcollector
Dec 17, 2018 7:56pm
Thread
I've never really understood the difference between making a 'print' and what we do with ink.

There isn’t any really. There are many types of prints; woodblock, intaglio, linocut, etc. Pink stuff is just another medium. The main considerations are archival paper and archival ink. And if you offer limited edition prints you should only print the advertised amount and no more.

It has nothing to do with size.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969498 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 18, 2018 8:12am
Thread
Thanks.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969498 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 18, 2018 10:11am
Thread
It has nothing to do with size.

That’s an entirely different discussion. 😳
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969443 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 19, 2018 6:49am
Thread
I took a print making class back in college, and I'm thinking that we did wet the paper first so it didn't warp. If only the inked part is wet, it could warp, so to have it all wet keeps it even.

And to re-wet it would be to help it dry flat, I'm thinking.

But then I'm still on my first cup of coffee and that was 20 years ago... :)
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969515 by photopam
Dec 19, 2018 8:14am
Thread
I think when I was in the LTC print tracker the hostess left out a step in her instructions. She kept saying make sure to let it dry for several days, which I didn't understand because my paint dried really fast. This makes sense now, I was supposed to wet the paper first. I used a ton of paper trying to get good imprints, the stamp kept getting stuck on the paper. This video made it look a lot easier.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969517 by Topcollector
Dec 19, 2018 10:05am
Thread
I live in Florida where the average humidity is around 110%. If you leave something out to "dry", it had better be indoors, and it had better be during air-conditioning season. Fall or spring the A/C doesn't run much, so even indoors the humidity is too high for reliable drying. Things will get dank and moldy rather than dry.

When I worked at P&WA in West Palm Beach, there was a station out on the assembly floor where you could get prints of jet engine diagrams made. It was a great innovation, because otherwise you'd have to climb two flights of stairs and put in an order and wait a day. This way, when you needed to check some dimensions or something, you could have your answer in a minute. The machine looked like any other printer only bigger, used sheets of paper about 3' x 4'. Had a stack of paper loaded in a tray, just like any other copier.

Did I mention that the assembly floor was not air conditioned? I worked there for years before I learned that, every night, the lady in charge of that printer took the remaining stack of paper out and threw it away. The next morning an entirely new stack of paper was taken out of storage in an air-conditioned area and loaded into the machine. Paper that had been in the machine more than 24 hours tended to absorb too much moisture and get all wavy and jam the machine.

Right now I'm trying to resurrect one of my stamps that was retrieved after the hiding location was bulldozed and paved. The container had been mangled so the stamp was wet. Doesn't hurt the rubber any, and doesn't hurt the oak backing, but the foam in between gets full of water. You can press it with your thumb and squeeze a few drops of water out. So, just leave it out to dry, right? It's been out to dry for three weeks, it ain't dry yet.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969522 by Kirbert
Dec 19, 2018 11:23am
Thread
So, just leave it out to dry, right? It's been out to dry for three weeks, it ain't dry yet.

You need to use a good SUtPO (Security Ultra-Thin Pad), Overnight model, with a breathable, flexible cover and a 3D capture core. . . with wings.

Wry Me
just helping you get the specs right
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969524 by Wry Me
Dec 19, 2018 1:24pm
Thread
... with wings.

What, and risk having your stamp fly away!?

DZ
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969522 by Kirbert
Dec 19, 2018 1:49pm
Thread
That reminds me of our copy paper years ago here in IL. It used to get wavy. For some reason it doesn't anymore. Our copy techs would tell us that we had to put it in the machine right-side up. ??? How ridiculous, since we could make 2-sided copies. Thanks for bringing back some memories.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969525 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 19, 2018 3:44pm
Thread
What, and risk having your stamp fly away!?

Not if you put the sticky side down.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969522 by Kirbert
Dec 20, 2018 1:26am
Thread
Use those packet thingies that keep things dry.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 20, 2018 6:06am
Thread
Shameless printmaking plug:

Hi, I am LROSEM. I am a stamp carver and a mixed media printmaker. I have a few pages for you all to check out.

https://www.facebook.com/SpeckledRoseCrafts/

https://www.etsy.com/shop/SpeckledRoseCrafts?ref=l2-shopheader-name

Also, If you are interested in learning about printmaking from thousands of experts, check out Linocut Friends on facebook.

You may now return to your regularly scheduled programming.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969533 by LROSEM
Dec 20, 2018 6:28am
Thread
Having purchased a print from LROSEM as a shameless gift for myself, I can tell you that her skills are amazing and totally worth checking her pages out! They are some real inspiration on what a talented carver can do. I can only aspire to gain her detail in my images!
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969534 by The Vs
Dec 20, 2018 6:50am
Thread
You are so kind! Thank you. <3
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969522 by Kirbert
Dec 20, 2018 6:56am
Thread
In ga we also have some crazy humidity. I often stick stuff in my gas oven and let the pilot light take care off it. Leave the oven light on or use a sticky note so you dont cook whatever it is. Works great on log books it you seperate pages first.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969536 by Quarry
Dec 20, 2018 8:41am
Thread
Holy cow, more memories. Years and years ago I had a friend who dried her jeans in the oven. Totally forgot. I'm getting so old.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 24, 2018 7:46pm
Thread
Good video!

I have no idea why she wets her paper. Unless she is sizing it. We do that for darkroom printing, but not usually for lino printing.

And why on earth would she put the finished product against newsprint? Her print is beautiful, but I would not trust newsprint. It could soil her work. Brown butcher paper would be safer.
Mounting a stamp for a child
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 24, 2018 7:48pm
Thread
Recently I posted a photo of a set of recent carves on my facebook wall. One of my friends reached out and asked if I'd be willing to carve another set for her daughter for her birthday, she is turning 5.

So I'm currently carving another set. I usually don't mount my stamps on anything but since these are going to a child's art table instead of tupperware in the woods, I thought maybe I should. Especially if it helps her get a better stamped image.

So I'm looking for advice: best way to mount stamps for a 5 year old's hands? Including type of glue?

Thanks and Merry Christmas!

(I was relieved when she asked me and did NOT ask for them to be done by Christmas...but I still only have another week to get them packaged and in the mail in time. Good thing I genuinely love the little squirt!) :)
Re: Mounting a stamp for a child
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969640 by Munkeybee
Dec 24, 2018 8:05pm
Thread
If I mount my stamps at all, I usually use 1/4 inch craft foam, cut to exactly fit the back of the stamp, and I glue it to the stamp using E6000 glue. (You should be able to get both of these at any craft store.) I follow the instructions on the glue package to get the best bond.

For me as an adult, I find that this gives a good backing that I can grip well, and the foam helps to evenly distribute the pressure during stamping, especially for larger stamps.

However, it might not be thick enough for a child. When I made some stamps for my grandma, she had trouble gripping the foam well enough. I eventually got some wood blocks cut to size and glued the foam to them. This made it easier for my grandma to handle.

So my suggestion would be to mount the stamps to wood blocks, with a layer of foam in between. E6000 glue should work for both layers I think. I would trim the edges of the stamp down to the shape of the image (rather than leaving a wide border of carved-out material surrounding the image, as some people do) and trim the foam to roughly follow the shape of the stamp. The wood blocks could be rectangular but cut to be the right size for the stamp. You could also stamp the stamp onto the wood before mounting it, to help stampers see the correct orientation.