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Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968973 by BBStacker
Dec 2, 2018 9:20am
Thread
A question for all you out there that are using this material - is it worth the effort to purchase or should I go to Michael's and buy some pink stuff?

Tan-Z is more like OZ. I'm not a conosour so it carves the same for me. Others notice a difference.

Let me echo the idea of buying a slab and trying it.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968973 by BBStacker
Dec 2, 2018 11:52am
Thread
Tan-Z - my comments are totally overwhelming positive. I did like the old pink, sure, but am over the moon about this stuff. Yes, it's quite firm and maybe that's why I feel like I can do (for me anyway) more challenging carves, and stamps up dandy with different inks. Light pre-sanding makes a world of difference. And yes, so grateful to Webfoot.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968973 by BBStacker
Dec 2, 2018 12:58pm
Thread
...is it worth the effort to purchase or should I go to Michael's and buy some pink stuff?

Why don't you just forget both of those and buy the Japanese stuff?

http://www.stampeaz.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=747
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968987 by Kirbert
Dec 2, 2018 1:13pm
Thread
Why don't you just forget both of those and buy the Japanese stuff?

If that’s a serious recommendation, can you tell us why (the pros and cons)?
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968973 by BBStacker
Dec 2, 2018 6:54pm
Thread
There is no "One Size Fits All" perfect material, and, to be honest, all of the carving materials have their issues. You have to determine what material works best for you and your carving style. I loved Orange when it was available, but other people hated it. Conversely, I hate using OZ and some people think it's the greatest. Get the smallest piece you can, then try it. If you don't like it, then go back to pink, or try something else. Tan-Z is the new kid and everyone has something to say about it. If you go back to messages posted when OZ came out, you'll probably find everyone giving their opinion on it, and a good bit of those will be negative comments, but people learned to like it.

dp
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968987 by Kirbert
Dec 3, 2018 5:18am
Thread
buy the Japanese stuff

I bought a slab of both types from Webfoot and liked one of them. The other was way too soft and I couldn't get favorable quality lettering with it. Sadly I can't remember which one was a bit more firm. But I was thinking as you are and thought I'd post the question on Tan-Z before making a decision.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968986 by Team Awesome Pants
Dec 3, 2018 5:20am
Thread
Thanks for all the replies everyone. Seeing such positive comments convinces me that I should give this new material a shot.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968988 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 3, 2018 10:56am
Thread
If that’s a serious recommendation, can you tell us why (the pros and cons)?

I only tried an early prototype of the tan stuff, but I didn't care for it at all. I prefer pink. But the Japanese stuff is some of the best carving material I've ever carved. It is soft -- even the "harder" version is still softer than most materials we're familiar with -- but the softness just makes it stamp really well! It carves like a dream. The problem used to be getting ahold of it without paying exorbitant shipping rates from Japan, but Webfoot now carries it solving that problem. Admittedly it's not cheap, but it'll be the only stuff I buy as long as it's available.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969011 by Kirbert
Dec 3, 2018 11:43am
Thread
I agree - I'm a complete convert from SLQ to the Japanese SEED (thanks, Rebiccola!).
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969011 by Kirbert
Dec 3, 2018 2:52pm
Thread
what is the name of it on Stampeaz?
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969031 by aMAZEing adventure frog
Dec 3, 2018 3:15pm
Thread
what is the name of it on Stampeaz?

Tan-Z Kut
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969031 by aMAZEing adventure frog
Dec 3, 2018 3:20pm
Thread
Kirbert provided a link to the product page in his initial post
https://www.atlasquest.com/boards/message.php?msgId=968987
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #968961 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 4, 2018 6:47am
Thread
What makes the texture is the extrusion process. It would have cost a *lot* more to have them totally retool the machine for my batch and as it was, I was able to piggy back onto the set-up for another material they made for a different customer and cut the set-up fee out of the cost of the run, too. The decision to leave it one-sided was mainly an economic one. And, since the original PZ had crimps on the back from the machines, too, I figured people could live with it for a lower cost material.

Also, I've been toying with an interesting idea for the back side of the material - it's on my list of things to play with when I carve my next multi-layer image. I thought it might make a really nice texture for shading. It's like it's already stippled and ready to give that intermediate shadow between white and black (or any other color) when printing. I think it could be pretty cool. Stay tuned! Or, if you beat me to the experiment, let us know how it works!

Webfoot
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969058 by Webfoot
Dec 4, 2018 7:11am
Thread
Ooo.. now there’s an idea!
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969034 by Bon Echo
Dec 4, 2018 9:04am
Thread
Found it. Ordered some. Thanks.
Re: Tan-Z Pattern
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969062 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 4, 2018 9:51am
Thread
As someone else said, carving is an individual skill. We all use different tools, different techniques, and have various limitations, preferences, and experience levels. The service that Stampeaz/Webfoot provides, is to make and offer a variety of materials, so virtually anyone can make SOMETHING work for them. I join in thanking her for great work!!
Solution for the back of Tan-Z
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 9, 2018 11:25am
Over in this thread (https://www.atlasquest.com/boards/messages.php?startId=968961;threadId=140760) there was talk of the pebble texture on the back of Tan-Z and how it could be removed so both sides were usable for carving.

There was also the suggestion for using the pebble texture for ‘shading’ which I found interesting. This morning I was test printing the back (it’s got promise!). But so as not to get ink all over myself when using the front, I took a paper towel and some acetone to clean off the residue ink.

And I discovered that with a light scrubbing the pebble texture came off and left the surface as smooth as the “front” side! No slicing, no chopping, no sanding needed! I’m guessing for larger areas you might want to use a block or something to keep the surface level but the solution to getting the back carvable proved to be pretty simple.
Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 15, 2018 9:00pm
Thread
This is a bit more involved than the processes I use but I think the attention to detail is something I could definitely learn from.

https://thekidshouldseethis.com/post/linocut-carving-and-printing-by-maarit-hanninen
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 16, 2018 8:52am
Thread
This is just my thoughts on the first video, and then the second one that was a two-color print. Take this from someone who is not as good at carving as her, but I know enough to appreciate her skill.

What immediately struck me was that the work of an artist from the Netherlands had a soundtrack in Spanish. It is a lovely language, but I was wondering why they didn't use a local artist singing in Dutch.

And at the end, she titles her work "Tomorrow, Tomorrow", in English. What a cosmopolitan world we've become.

Then I was wondering why she used so much water. She soaked the paper in water, mostly dried it then did a print. After printing she sprayed and pressed the paper to dry it out again. Then she signed them in pencil, rather than ink. Curious.

I also noticed the way she did the pencil transfer. Why make your own carbon paper rather than buy some? Is carbon paper so far from common memory that people don't know about it, or is it just not available there?

I then watched the video on the two-color printing. It was neat how she did the transfer for the second color. I'd like to (someday) try a multi-color print. I've done one, but it was a large stamp (about 3" by 2") with a small portion (about 1" by ¾") that was a second color, so I don't really count that.

She also carved out large areas with a gouge. Instead of carving out strips, she carved out combs then finished by carving out the connected area. I've done that sometimes, but with only a few (3-5) teeth.

Very interesting and relaxing carving videos. They were lovely prints too.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969443 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 16, 2018 11:46am
Thread
I agree it's a very soothing video to watch. Thanks to lonnewsom for linking to it!

But I was also confused by some of her methodologies.
I also noticed the way she did the pencil transfer. Why make your own carbon paper rather than buy some? Is carbon paper so far from common memory that people don't know about it, or is it just not available there?

Dick Blick sells it (along with many other places) and ships internationally. But I'm not sure why it's needed in the first place. I carved a bit of linoleum for a more durable sig stamp and acetone transferred it just fine. I'm guessing that would also eliminated the need for painting the surface red (and why not white?).

Then I was wondering why she used so much water. She soaked the paper in water, mostly dried it then did a print.

I'm pretty sure that's left over from an Intaglio (printmaking) process she used to use. In that process, the ink is down in grooves (as opposed to being on a raised surface). The paper must be malleable enough to be forced down into the groves, hence the soaking. Here's an engraving I did years ago, you can see around the edges of the print itself how the press indented the paper.

It also shows signing the print in pencil which is the traditional way is to sign and number art prints. Also, a pencil mark cannot be easily reproduced by computers, making it less vulnerable to fraud.

DZ
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969443 by Oberon_Kenobi
Dec 16, 2018 2:20pm
Thread
I tried using graphite paper on linoleum recently and it did not transfer at all. Is that why she sanded the lino first? Is that common practice?
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969447 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 16, 2018 3:42pm
Thread
I'm pretty sure that's left over from an Intaglio (printmaking) process she used to use.

On this link you provided, I noticed an example used on currency. Getting (slightly) off topic, I am in awe at the type of skill it takes to carve at that scale. Or, do they use computers to do it now days? Then I am in awe of how they did it "back in the day" when they had to do it by hand.

It also shows signing the print in pencil which is the traditional way is to sign and number art prints. [...] making it less vulnerable to fraud.

That is something I didn't know. Thanks for telling me (and others) about this.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969450 by InkTap
Dec 16, 2018 4:37pm
Thread
I tried using graphite paper on linoleum recently and it did not transfer at all. Is that why she sanded the lino first? Is that common practice?

I have very limited experience with linoleum, but I’d wager that if graphite doesn’t transfer to it well then that’s the reason for the paint. She probably sanded it first to get the paint to adhere to it.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969447 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 16, 2018 9:52pm
Thread
I attended an art class a couple years ago and that's how they had us transfer the images--by coloring the back instead of tracing first and just flipping it over and transferring it. With carbon paper I would think there would be movement during the transfer process. I used carbon paper at work for 10-15 years before we got copiers and lift-off tape so we didn't have to pray we didn't make a typo or have to re-type the whole thing. Oh, remember onion skin copies--yuk.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969464 by Topcollector
Dec 16, 2018 10:40pm
Thread
... that's how they had us transfer the images--by coloring the back instead of tracing first and just flipping it over and transferring it. With carbon paper I would think there would be movement during the transfer process.

There might be but it doesn’t matter. I used to work at a commercial art studio. One of my jobs was transferring drawings by the artist. As long as the original (top) drawing is taped down securely it doesn’t matter if there is movement of the carbon paper, the transfer will be registered properly. It’s only the top drawing that matters regardless of which process you use.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 17, 2018 10:20am
Thread
Thanks, I intend to get into this. There are several mediums for prints.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969433 by lonnewsom
Dec 17, 2018 1:27pm
Thread
I've never really understood the difference between making a 'print' and what we do with ink. Is it the type of paper they use, the size of the image (I notice these are always large pictures), the longevity? I tried doing a print LTC once with paint and it was really hard. Maybe if I had dipped my paper in water like she did it wouldn't have stuck so much. I really didn't see that much difference in the results other than there was a raised image.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969485 by Topcollector
Dec 17, 2018 7:56pm
Thread
I've never really understood the difference between making a 'print' and what we do with ink.

There isn’t any really. There are many types of prints; woodblock, intaglio, linocut, etc. Pink stuff is just another medium. The main considerations are archival paper and archival ink. And if you offer limited edition prints you should only print the advertised amount and no more.

It has nothing to do with size.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969498 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 18, 2018 8:12am
Thread
Thanks.
Re: Excellent video showing print making process
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #969498 by DarkZen and Evil Cow Pie
Dec 18, 2018 10:11am
Thread
It has nothing to do with size.

That’s an entirely different discussion. 😳