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Read Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting

Re: Transfer Technique
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321342 by RavenWolf
Dec 9, 2008 2:42pm
Thread
I got a paper towel and kept is moist. It was one of those tattoos that are mass produced, my mom bought it in a gift store. I wanted to try a few more carves with the tattoos that you get in the machines at the grocery store before I purchase sheets. Thanks for the baby powder idea.

EM
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321135 by phoenix8
Dec 9, 2008 2:49pm
Thread
Personally, I always iron on my images. I print them on a LASER printer, although you can go to your local copy center and copy the image too.
Set your iron on high, no steam and place the image on the rubber face down. It takes a little practice ironing. To long and you melt the rubber, not long enough and you don't get a complete transfer. I peel the corner to check the progress....
Best method I have found...
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321361 by The Vs
Dec 10, 2008 5:36am
Thread
Set your iron on high

I find it surprising that this setting is recommended. If I use anything over 2 the pink stuff becomes hard and difficult to carve. I get my images transferred in under 10 seconds at setting 1.5.

As an aside, it should be noted that you do NOT want to heat the pink stuff twice. Then it's got the consistency of the tires on a Radio Flyer wagon.

*S
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321557 by BrewHiker
Dec 10, 2008 10:02am
Thread
Set your iron on high

I find it surprising that this setting is recommended.

Me too, only because it's the first time I've heard it recommended. My (ancient) iron has a lever that moves around a semicircle, and I've been using a setting just a bit past 1/2 way. And that works well for me. I have discovered that a setting much lower, on the low half of the semicircle, causes problems; it needs to be at least half way on my iron for a clean transfer.

It might also have to do with your particular transferring style. If you go with a hotter iron, you may develop the habit of not applying it as long -- or you use thicker paper, or you put a towel between the iron and the paper, or other variations. I use a setting a bit past 1/2, I use regular printer paper, I apply the iron for perhaps 5 to 10 seconds, and I press pretty hard with it.

I also slide the iron around a bit just in case my old cheap iron has any "hot spots" or cold spots, although I haven't seen any evidence of any yet. Once I press the iron to paper for a couple of seconds, the paper seems to adhere to the rubber while the iron becomes pretty slick against the paper and will slide around freely. It seems that if I apply the iron for a bit longer, it's no longer slick and doesn't want to slide around on the paper any more, which seems to be an indication that I'm done.

I usually peel the paper right then, while it's still hot, although it cools significantly in the time it takes me to set the iron down safely.

you do NOT want to heat the pink stuff twice. Then it's got the consistency of the tires on a Radio Flyer wagon.

Interesting. When you say "twice", do you mean you didn't like the first transfer, so you go clean it off with acetone and prepare another printout to try again? Because I haven't had any problem with the pink stuff with a single transfer, no matter how the iron was applied. The pink stuff actually suggests iron transfers on the package.
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321557 by BrewHiker
Dec 10, 2008 1:14pm
Thread
I use only high. I primarily iron onto the white stuff (PZCut), when I use pink, I find I move quicker and don't hold the iron down as long...but I only use high...
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321658 by Kirbert
Dec 10, 2008 1:16pm
Thread
I don't hold ot down long. I also am often ironing on 2 thicknesses of regular paper as I have cut out the image and need a second layer to protect the rubber. I do also keep the iron moving the whole time....
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321743 by The Vs
Dec 10, 2008 1:42pm
Thread
I found blender pens at a local art store and am having HUGE success at transfers now!!!!! The pen was about $3 and images transfer very well. The only thing I have noticed is that if I copy something with a laser jet printer, then let it sit for a few weeks the image does not transfer as well. It seems to transfer better if I use it within a couple of weeks. Weird.
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321752 by Sharkboy and Lavagirl
Dec 10, 2008 2:21pm
Thread
I have noticed is that if I copy something with a laser jet printer, then let it sit for a few weeks the image does not transfer as well. It seems to transfer better if I use it within a couple of weeks.

I've noticed the same thing with the Xerox copies I use.

dancing pecan
Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Dec 11, 2008 10:05am
Thread
Bet you thought this would be be a post about image transfer with a pencil rubbing. Well, it's not, even though I did just use a pencil rubbing to transfer a simple image.

Anyway, I just found myself with a 4-year-old microbox (to be recycled as an event stamp) that did not contain the stamp I thought it did. Silly me for not looking inside, eh?

Faced with impending infamy for not having a "special" stamp for said event later this afternoon, I dashed to the supply cabinet here at the office and found a "suitable" stamp medium:

A Magic Rub eraser, about 1" x 2". The two surfaces with that dimension are smooth. Not incredibly smooth, as some erasers have lumps and machine marks, but smooth enough. A pencil rubbing transfers quite cleanly.

Note that I put suitable in " " above. Carving this stuff is an adventure in cursing. The interior volume of this material has the consistency of Swiss cheese, complete with the requisite bubbles. The elasticity of the material makes starting a gouge moving rather interesting: at first it resists, resists, resists and then all of a sudden the gouge is sliding through the material with all the grace of a garbage truck on an icy road.

Fine details? Nuh-uh. BASIC details are what you'll get, mainly because at some point the gouge will suddenly accelerate right toward those "fine" details and slice right through them before you can apply the brakes.

Lessons learned: look at your really old boxes before you walk out the door, and always carry a small bit of your preferred carving material with you!

*S
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 11, 2008 10:16am
Thread
sliding through the material with all the grace of a garbage truck on an icy road.

You have a real gift for descriptive prose, my friend. LOL

Knit Wit
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 11, 2008 10:25am
Thread
I dashed to the supply cabinet here at the office and found a "suitable" stamp medium

What? - no Michael's near you??
Re: Image Transfers...What Gives?
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #321658 by Kirbert
Dec 11, 2008 10:26am
Thread
you do NOT want to heat the pink stuff twice. Then it's got the consistency of the tires on a Radio Flyer wagon. -StarSAELS

Interesting. When you say "twice", do you mean you didn't like the first transfer, so you go clean it off with acetone and prepare another printout to try again? - Kirbert

No, actually it was a matter of overlapping. I learned this lesson some time ago, but dredging it up will benefit the new carvers...

A couple of years ago I iron-transferred a couple of images to the pink stuff and didn't separate the area for the stamps-to-be from the rest of the slab. A section about 2" x 3" that was not receiving an image was under the paper and got heated by the iron.

A couple weeks later, I went to transfer a couple more images, and this area was targeted for image reception. One image fit within the area with room to spare, so a second image was butted right up close to the first.

After transferring the images, I noticed that the transfer in that area wasn't all that great. Still carveable, but not as dark and clear as I had expected. Not knowing to what that could be attributed, I fuggudaboutit. While carving the 'second' stamp, I noticed that one section of the stamp was remarkably harder to carve through. Again, I didn't know to what that could be attributed, but I didn't fuggedaboutit.

As soon as I started carving the 'first' stamp, I noticed the same difficulty in moving the gouge through the rubber. When I got to one side of that stamp, it became so difficult to move even an X-Acto blade through the rubber that I gave up on that stamp.

In applying the scientific method to determine what might have happened, I came to the realization that the whole surface of that 'first' stamp had been heated twice, and that a section of it had been heated once, twice, and then a third time!

*S
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 11, 2008 5:12pm
Thread
I will admit- I have an emergency carve stash at work.
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322305 by Poodle Circus
Dec 11, 2008 5:24pm
Thread
I will admit- I have an emergency carve stash at work.

Some time back I came to the realization that my SOP for carving stamps -- mounting the rubber on foam and wood first and then carving using a clipboard set on spacers and a magnifying stand -- was not particularly workable "on the road", so to speak. I decided that, in order to open the possibility of carving a stamp on-site, I'd assemble a kit of sorts. It includes an assortment of pre-assembled stamp blanks of varying sizes, pink stuff on foam on wood; pink stuff was chosen because it works the best with on-the-road transfers, rubbing from a newspaper or from pencil rubbings or whatnot. It also includes carving tools, magnifying glasses, etc.

I've been carrying it around for a while, but I haven't used it yet. When we're on the road, I can't really see setting down and carving; that's for between letterboxing trips! I've actually been considering going ahead and carving those blanks into stamps and doing away with the kit.
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322312 by Kirbert
Dec 12, 2008 5:59am
Thread
I've actually been considering going ahead and carving those blanks into stamps and doing away with the kit.

Hmpf. As soon as you do, you'll need it and you won't have it. Instant karma's gonna getcha!

*S
Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 12, 2008 8:50am
Thread
How many of you have pulled out a pocket knife and carved a stamp on the trail?
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322541 by Rick in Boca
Dec 12, 2008 8:57am
Thread
I've used a pocketknife (Swiss Army / Victorinox) to finish a stamp.

*S
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 12, 2008 9:37am
Thread
In case anyone wants to see the 99 Bottles Magic Rub Christmas Tree:

http://www.atlasquest.com/images/gallery/06/20/60520lg.jpg

The big red thing on the tree is an ornament stamp.

*S
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322451 by BrewHiker
Dec 12, 2008 10:36am
Thread
As soon as you do, you'll need it and you won't have it. Instant karma's gonna getcha!

I think you're right, and here's why: You get into a mentality with things like this. For example, on a recent trip SWMBO and I found a geocache and then explored the area and found a really lovely place. As we're preparing to leave, she asked why I hadn't decided to plant a letterbox there. Well, because it hadn't occurred to me. It had been too long since I planted a box; it had slipped my mind.

By the same token, it never occurs to me to carve a stamp on-site. But the minute I ditch that kit, it'll be in my mind, and then it will occur to me to carve a stamp on-site!
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322616 by Kirbert
Dec 12, 2008 10:46am
Thread
By the same token, it never occurs to me to carve a stamp on-site.

As I normally plan ahead for a planting by doing a thorough exploration of an area, observing people at different times, developing directions for clues, etc. etc, I don't usually carry a ready-to-plant box around with me.

Except when travelling.

*S
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322541 by Rick in Boca
Dec 12, 2008 10:47am
Thread
How many of you have pulled out a pocket knife and carved a stamp on the trail?

Sounds like fodder for a survey.

I never have, either literally or figuratively. I wouldn't try to carve a stamp with a pocket knife; I care too much about finders to ever create anything that horrible. Besides, I don't carry a pocket knife. But even carrying a reasonable set of carving tools -- strong reading glasses, wire knife with pin vise, pre-made blank stamps -- I still have never done it.

I would have to say, though, that the biggest reason I've never done it is: SWMBO. She really doesn't care that much for letterboxing, prefers geocaching. She's out to hike trails and see places, and she likes geocaches that we can just TNLNSL and get on with it. When I'm stamping into a letterbox, I can already feel her getting impatient to be on our way. The idea of me sitting down and carving a stamp would be difficult to fathom, although it could be done with careful planning -- having a pile of take-out BBQ ribs so we can sit down and have a picnic, for example. Trouble is, with careful planning I could have carved the stamp at home!

The closest thing I have done is clean up one of my own stamps while visiting for maintenance. It was one of my early efforts, and I was very proud of it except that it made quite a few stray marks unless it was stamped on a flat table top -- which doesn't happen on the trail. So I went prepared with a couple of gouges and my strong reading glasses -- neither of which I owned at the time I originally carved the stamp -- and just cleaned up a whole bunch of the non-stamping areas.
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322541 by Rick in Boca
Dec 12, 2008 11:31am
Thread
I also have an interest in woodcarving. When I travel I usually have a "Flexcut" brand multi-blade pocket knife with me. It is marketed for wood carving and includes a small "Vee gouge". I have used this knife to carve a stamp, but not while actually out on the trail.
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322670 by 1SG
Dec 12, 2008 4:48pm
Thread
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322541 by Rick in Boca
Dec 12, 2008 4:56pm
Thread
How many of you have pulled out a pocket knife and carved a stamp on the trail?

Well, not with a pocket knife on the trail, but I did carve one while standing in line to vote. I left a little trail of PZ Kut shavings as I walked along.
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322791 by The Wolf Family
Dec 12, 2008 9:34pm
Thread
How many people asked what you were doing -- and what you were doing it for?

*S
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322912 by BrewHiker
Dec 12, 2008 10:05pm
Thread
Well, not with a pocket knife on the trail, but I did carve one while standing in line to vote.

How many people asked what you were doing -- and what you were doing it for?

Not on the trail either - but I did carve a couple times at a little league game...only had one person ask me if I had drawn the image...but no questions about what it was I was doing exactly with the image...
Re: Speedy-Cut
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #316607 by Kirbert
Dec 12, 2008 10:23pm
Thread
I tried that stuff 'cause it was recommended and I agree-this stuff is crumbly and not worth the money. Luckily my much smarter LB buddy ordered some PZ cut and I saw the light!
Re: Go Ahead... RUB it in...
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322105 by BrewHiker
Dec 13, 2008 4:08am
Thread
I used to carry my carving kit with my 'boxing bag, and exactly ONE time I did carve while on the trail (not with my knife). I found a recently released HH sans stamp, since it was a very simple image I duplicated it. I notified the HH originator of what I had done prior to sending it on it's way (in case he objected and/or wanted it back).

This was early in my Lb career and I haven't carved on the trail since. OTOH, I did carve my sig. stamp with my knife...out of a Stadler eraser. ;)
Still using it, too.
Connfederate
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #322919 by She Runs
Dec 13, 2008 8:13am
Thread
I often carve in the waiting area at my daughter's dance school, and the kids are ALWAYS asking me what I'm doing!

:-)
Kit Kat
Re: Carving on the trail
Board: Stamp Carving and Mounting
Reply to: #323000 by Kit Kat 61
Dec 13, 2008 10:29am
Thread
I often carve in the waiting area at my daughter's dance school

me too. And since I have more than one child, the others always want to carve when I pull out the stuff.

Ü