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Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Mar 18, 2019 5:30pm
Thread
I'm considering hiding a letterbox in a guardrail. Any suggestions for a container?
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 18, 2019 5:59pm
Thread
I've used magnetized pouches to good effect in guardrails. They often can be tucked in so they are protected from liquids (heat is a different story but not typically an issue) and with the magnets taped inside the pouch (or on the outer wall with double layer tape) the box can stay put too. Color of duct tape allows for a match to rail a bit too.
Edit: I have used Altoid boxes with magnets glued inside as well but moisture can cause rusting even if protected in the rail.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 18, 2019 6:12pm
Thread
I have used the metal boxes to hide a key under your car type container. Very strong magnet. Cover slides open, you can get a very small stamp and logbook in there. Won't be watertight though, depending on what type of weather/climate you've got.

Warrior Woman
loves hardware stores
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 18, 2019 6:13pm
Thread
I have done a couple of guardrail boxes using magnetic key-holder boxes, and they work great! I have found 2 sizes, in hardware type stores, etc. Of course, the size of the stamp and logbook are limited, but you dont have to worry about the heat or the rust problem. Besides its a fun challenge! The magnets are pretty strong and never come off.

bluesky
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 18, 2019 6:43pm
Thread
We have found many in the guardrails over the years and we have planted some in them. We have seen many options and have used a few of them ourselves. As some have said magnets can help hold them in place. None of our guardrail hides have got magnets. Most of ours are pouches that are tucked into some of the hiding in the rails. We have a couple of them in lock-n-lock type boxes and they are working just fine too. Picking the right location of the guardrail and the right place in the rail do seem to make a difference.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 18, 2019 9:10pm
Thread
Beware that wasps/yellowjackets like to build their nests inside enclosed parts of guardrails. Just sayin'.......
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 19, 2019 2:43am
Thread
I've planted several guardrail boxes -- not just at some random location on the guardrail but rather at the end. At some guardrail ends, there's a broad piece of metal curled into a complete circle to create a safer target for cars to hit. That curled piece is bolted onto the end of the straight rail in such a way that it creates a little pocket that's hidden from view. I favor large-mouth screw-top jars for containers, and a small peanut butter jar will slide right into this pocket. You can slide it in far enough it cannot be seen, finders have to feel around for it.

If you hide somewhere along a guardrail that's more visible, I recommend regular ol' duct tape -- the silvery-lookin' stuff -- as camo. It's remarkably good camo on a guardrail.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 19, 2019 3:47am
Thread
Small, round LnL type boxes.
Some I've found are in the 3x4" LnL type.
Magnetic pouch, folded enough times to repel plowed up snow for several months.

I know you know this O_K, for the new folks reading this thread:
Planting: Be sure there's adequate parking in a safe location.
Stay away from busy highways.
Stay away from blind corners.
Finding: Have a poky stick just in case of critters.
Don't push it back so far into the rail so other will need to go elbow deep to find it.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972879 by Grrly Girl
Mar 19, 2019 6:28am
Thread
Be sure there's adequate parking in a safe location.

The particular place that I am considering has a nice, big place to park on a side road that branches off a few hundred feet south of the guardrail. I have considered the other things too, but these are things to always think about.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 19, 2019 12:06pm
Thread
altoid box with magnets are the best. make sure finders can safely park nearby. some of my most memorable near misses have involved guard rail letterboxes
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972920 by fleetwood7
Mar 19, 2019 2:10pm
Thread
altoid box with magnets are the best.

Metal will eventually rust shut if exposed to enough moisture in the air.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972856 by Oberon_Kenobi
Mar 19, 2019 2:13pm
Thread
I'm considering hiding a letterbox in a guardrail. Any suggestions for a container?

Most of the guardrail boxes I have found have been in regular lock n lock containers. Works fine if it's the type of guardrail where you can stick the container inside. No magnet required.
Re: Guardrail box
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #972943 by MissMoon
Mar 20, 2019 9:57am
Thread
Metal will eventually rust shut if exposed to enough moisture in the air.

Completely agree. I have been forced to use tools to pry the lids off of rusted boxes in the past. Hope the next finder had their tetanus shot...
How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Mar 27, 2019 12:45pm
Thread
Alright, I admit it, I'm being lazy about this and calling upon your help instead of ploughing through AQ and the internet to find out for myself!

My goal is to try to prevent my letterboxes from going missing or being "geotrashed" (sorry if I offend any geocachers) because they're planted too close to a geocache.

Occasionally I read comments by letterbox finders who mention about caches being located near a box, or a box is missing its stamp, or filled with caching trinkets. So in planning to plant letterboxes, is there a way to easily determine if there is a geocache nearby a potential hiding spot? I have no particular interest in taking up geocaching, have no GPS or "fancy" phone, but have had an account on geocaching.com since before I started letterboxing, even though I have no real intention to take up this hobby. I briefly looked on the geocaching website at the state park that I have in mind to plant, and it has 649 (!) caches listed. In looking at the map that shows the cache icons I'm wondering how accurate are the locations. (I seem to recall hearing that the gps coordinates are not exact?) It doesn't look like there's much room left for any letterboxes!

Perhaps I have to resign myself to the fact that I must get a gps and learn how to locate a cache unless anyone has a shortcut method they could share with me!

Thanks for any help,
sojourner
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 27, 2019 1:35pm
Thread
I think the easiest way is to download the app on your phone. This is because your phone has location tracker & will tell you how close you are to the next geocache. The app on my phone says it's accurate to within 30 feet. The other way is to get on the geocache website ahead of time & zoom into the area you are trying to plant your box. This seems more difficult because you have to know ahead where you want to put it. Having a GPS unit, you still would have to access the website, get the coordinates & then punch them into the device. Maybe if a letterboxing friend has a smart phone & could download the app & go with you?
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973439 by LadyRisa
Mar 27, 2019 1:42pm
Thread
can you please tell me the name of the app you're talking about?
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 27, 2019 1:46pm
Thread
Almost all geocaches (on the geocache.com website map) are exactly where the cache is. There is a type of cache where the map only shows the rough coordinates and you have to determine the actual coordinates by solving some sort of puzzle. There is also a hard and fast rule that geocaches cannot be closer together than 528 feet (0.1 miles). So if you do know where a cache is and you can find a good hiding spot about 250 feet away then you SHOULD be safe. Geocachers looking for a nearby cache should not venture that far from the listed location while searching.

Now, they might still come across your box if they are looking for a place to hide a new cache if they themselves have not first checked to see if there is an existing cache nearby. So, there are no guarantees.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973440 by QueenMother'n'CloudWalker
Mar 27, 2019 1:52pm
Thread
The app I use is the official geocaching app called "Geocaching". There are several others but this one is free.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973440 by QueenMother'n'CloudWalker
Mar 27, 2019 2:12pm
Thread
It’s called “geocaching”
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 27, 2019 2:37pm
Thread
Please be aware that you will only be able to see the approximate final locations of traditional caches on the app. Puzzles/mystery caches (indicated by a ?) and multi-caches are not necessarily where they are indicated on the geocaching app map. Unless you have solved the puzzles or found the final stage of the multi cache you will not know the location of those caches. That being said if you stay within the 528 ft radius of the location of a known cache you might be ok.

As with anything you release in the “wild”, anything can happen to it. You can only try and minimize what happens it. The rest is up to fate....

Good luck!
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 27, 2019 3:24pm
Thread
My goal is to try to prevent my letterboxes from going missing or being "geotrashed" (sorry if I offend any geocachers) because they're planted too close to a geocache.

I think there's a Murphy's Law: A letterbox planted far from geocaches attracts a new geocache.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973443 by PI Joe
Mar 27, 2019 5:18pm
Thread
The app I use is the official geocaching app called "Geocaching". There are several others but this one is free.

Thank you!
QM
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973444 by LadyRisa
Mar 27, 2019 5:20pm
Thread
It’s called “geocaching”

Thank you. QM
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973446 by Outdoorsoccer
Mar 27, 2019 6:51pm
Thread
Please be aware that you will only be able to see the approximate final locations of traditional caches on the app.

I disagree with this. It will certainly get you within 20 feet or so at the worst... providing of course the hider got the coordinates right. That’s close enough to get you out of a cache’s range.

Due to the proximity barriers of caches (528 feet, including mystery cache finals) if you place a box 200-250 feet away from a cache you should be safe.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973442 by PI Joe
Mar 27, 2019 6:58pm
Thread
This is the response that includes the most complete information, but be sure to read all of them. Registering for a free account lets you see the location of above 90% of the caches in an area, the traditional caches. You won't see premium member caches. You won't see the stages (other than the first) of multi-caches, sort of like a letterbox series.

Mystery caches are a catch-all. They are of two types, where the posted location is the actual location and puzzles where it isn't. Challenge caches (must include "Challenge) in the name) are the ones at the actual location where a cacher must complete geocaching qualifications to be able to log a find on the cache. With puzzles one must solve a puzzle to find the coordinates.

There are also other geocaching web sites, but they are a very small minority of the geocaches out there. These other sites will list caches that may be between ones on the geocaching.com web site.

So do the best you can. Geocaches get trashed by muggles, eco-warriors and construction too.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973443 by PI Joe
Mar 27, 2019 7:00pm
Thread
The app I use is the official geocaching app called "Geocaching".

I use "c:geo". It is maintained by geocachers for geocachers. As far as I know it is only available on Android.

It allows live maps and local storage of caches of interest. You can also load pocket queries (a geocaching.com premium member feature) that allows you to pre-filter geocaches and put this query in a file.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 27, 2019 10:31pm
Thread
To help from being geotrashed, I put a label in big writing:

THIS IS NOT(underlined) A GEOCACHE,
NOTHING LEAVES THIS BOX!

So far, so good.

Lynn
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 28, 2019 4:08am
Thread
Plenty of food for thought - thanks everyone for your input!
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973436 by sojourner
Mar 28, 2019 8:28am
Thread
is there a way to easily determine if there is a geocache nearby a potential hiding spot?

The simplest and most completely 100% accurate way to tell is by planting a letterbox there. If a week later the stamp is missing and replaced by a half-chewed hair-tie and 3 pennies, then you know a geocache is nearby. So don't plant a letterbox there.
Re: How to find out if geocaches are nearby.
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #973484 by wassamatta u
Mar 28, 2019 12:55pm
Thread
On a few occasions where I know a geocache is near a letterbox, I will put a note in the box telling where to find the geocache ("it's 20 feet to your left"). In one case, the 'cacher added a note to HIS clue that said not to confuse it with my letterbox that was at the next fencepost. The box and 'cache coexisted for years.

K