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Re: What to make of this?
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938072 by Trekkie Gal
Nov 16, 2016 2:02pm
Thread
I went ahead and changed the status of the two boxes to retired so they won't continue to show up in searches.

Sometimes finding the clues is part of the mystery, though probably not in this case.
Re: What to make of this?
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938075 by dingus dufus
Nov 16, 2016 3:06pm
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Before the days of reserved boxes??? Started it and didn't finish
missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Dec 10, 2016 5:35pm
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I set out today to find a series of boxes that were planted in a cemetery in a neighboring town. When I found the first box, the stamp and log book were gone, replaced with a note that read, "All of your boxes have been pulled. This is a sacred area, and not the place to be playing your childish games." Has anyone else encountered anything like this?
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 10, 2016 5:52pm
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I hope you have let the planter know. There may be other boxes at risk. I also suggest you post this on the state discussion board so others will know. We, as a community, have experienced a few other situations like this, and it's never nice.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 10, 2016 6:10pm
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I know many others feel differently, but I have always been uncomfortable planting in cemeteries, with the exception of boxes done in honor of a specific person buried there, notable for historical or pioneering reasons, or a writer, poet, explorer, artist, something of that nature. And in the cases of the ones I've found, the clue contained educational and interesting information about the person, and my visits were done quietly and respectfully.

Aside from such boxes, I avoid cemetery boxes, because I do think it's disrespectful to traipse around the graves, looking for random, unrelated stamps.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 10, 2016 6:17pm
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We've been boxing in the same area as you lately. May I ask which town or series?
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 10, 2016 7:49pm
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not the place to be playing your childish games.

Sounds like they'd prefer people played strip poker or beer pong.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938908 by Wise Wanderer
Dec 10, 2016 8:13pm
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I do think it's disrespectful to traipse around the graves

With all due respect to your personal beliefs (and apologies to anyone who's seen this information before), my culture makes it a regular event (generally after church on Sundays) to take a picnic, the family and some libations to the graveyard. We sit on the graves of our elders and share family stories and sometimes heartache. You always leave a little food and definitely some libation as a tribute to those who went before. We also believe that it keeps the spirits from getting bored and causing problems.

I love graveyard plants; I'm careful to chat with anyone near where I'm boxing and I love the history that you can find in particularly old cemeteries.

I always hate to see any box go missing, regardless of the reason.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938913 by Public Hand
Dec 10, 2016 9:34pm
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We sit on the graves of our elders and share family stories and sometimes heartache. You always leave a little food and definitely some libation as a tribute to those who went before. We also believe that it keeps the spirits from getting bored and causing problems.

That has a different feel to it, particularly if you are talking about your own elders and ancestors, and it is customary to you as a way of remembering and sharing family time. What I was referring to, is people with no connection to a cemetary, planting irrelevant stamps/boxes for other strangers to find.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938913 by Public Hand
Dec 11, 2016 5:44am
Thread
my culture makes it a regular event (generally after church on Sundays) to take a picnic, the family and some libations to the graveyard. We sit on the graves of our elders and share family stories and sometimes heartache.

My grandparents lived across the street from a large wooded cemetery. During family events, they would send us cousins out to play and we would go across the street. My favorite game was playing "Lost in Space" where we would all be a particular character in that TV show (Penny!) and certain large tombstones would be our spaceships. The cemetery was on a big river bluff, and there was an old road going down the hill that we all wanted to sled down, but the grandparents wouldn't let us. Not because it was a cemetery, but because at the bottom was the river ice and there were currents.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 11, 2016 6:03am
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No, but after my cemetery box was taken, I decided not to plant more in cemeteries.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 11, 2016 6:14am
Thread
My experience in looking for letterboxes in cemeteries, is when the cemetery is of recent graves, unless the box is hidden in the perimeter, not by the graves, usually the box stays active. Historical cemeteries are better places for planting, since those that visit are interested in the old gravestones, and are therefore respectful. There is an amazing series of "Lunettes" in Conn. planted by Nomad Indian Saint. Her carved stamps are fabulous. But more importantly I learned so much about the colonial carvers. It was a history lesson.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938916 by Wise Wanderer
Dec 11, 2016 6:17am
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I've searched for many boxes in cemeteries (and planted one myself), and I honestly cannot remember any of them not having some historical reference in the clue, either about people interred there or the cemetery itself. The only time I wonder about those boxes is when they are placed under the corner of a headstone. Otherwise, if they are on the outskirts, or in a tree, or in some kind of interesting container, or even adjacent to a stone with permission, I am fine with it.

I enjoy exploring cemeteries anyway; especially old ones, and have passed on that enjoyment to my daughter, who may not be into Letterboxing itself anymore, but always tells me that I better not do a cemetery box without her!

Jaxx
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938921 by Jaxx
Dec 11, 2016 6:31am
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I have found the opposite in my area, and few with historical siginificance. I'm not a big fan, but I would be more of a fan if I knew the planter got permission from the cemetery staff, if there is a staff...

For old, abandoned cemeteries, I say go ahead and plant, as long as not to disturb the graves, etc.

No one will ever agree on this, as everyone has different views, but that is why I would only plant in a cemetery with permission. However that doesn't mean the landscapers or visitors won't be offended and remove the boxes.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938910 by Rocklun
Dec 11, 2016 7:04am
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It was in Scotland.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938908 by Wise Wanderer
Dec 11, 2016 7:06am
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This particular cemetery has a large number of colonial era stones, and the series was in reference to such. Two boxes were placed in perimeter stone walls, and one in a tree stump; none were in any proximity to any actual plots.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938923 by yakkman
Dec 11, 2016 11:41am
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It sounds like the boxes were placed respectfully and in an effort to educate about the local history. (See your next post.) But this is a different country and perhaps the attitudes about cemeteries there are not the same as in the U.S. Or maybe the note demonstrated the opinion of only one individual. Who knows?
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938936 by Boxer Lover47
Dec 11, 2016 12:33pm
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But this is a different country and perhaps the attitudes about cemeteries there are not the same as in the U.S.

He meant Scotland, CT. :^)
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938941 by Rocklun
Dec 11, 2016 4:06pm
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Seriously???
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938946 by Boxer Lover47
Dec 11, 2016 4:13pm
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Seriously???

I know! I don't know about other "international" towns in CT, but Massachusetts has a Holland, Wales, and Peru.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938947 by Rocklun
Dec 11, 2016 6:02pm
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Iowa has Madrid, and Nevada - pronounced MAD-rid and Ne-VA-da.

Hey ~ who said "Off Topic?" They started it!
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938950 by Maude
Dec 11, 2016 6:12pm
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Iowa has Madrid

Our Madrid in New Mexico is pronounced MAD-rid. We also have a Thoreau pronounced Threw.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 11, 2016 7:43pm
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That sounds less sacred than lonely. I am warped, I guess, but I like the idea of people stepping on my head and playing hide-n-seek. The wind shrieking among my headstone for an eternity of whispers and bowed-head silence gives me the screaming willies.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938954 by Wry Me
Dec 11, 2016 9:56pm
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I do consider it in poor form to plant in the actual landscaping of the graves of people not known to you, mostly because it is a highly personal space where the family still visits and grieves. That does make boxing look frivolous in comparison, unless they are very old graves. I got two cemetery finds today, in fact. Most of the ones here are in trees and landscaping of the cemetery itself and not at actual gravesites. I think that makes a difference.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 12, 2016 4:49am
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I have a cemetery box in Colchester that has been looked after by the custodian ever since he "caught " boxers stamping in. He once built a cubby hole for it when a new stonewall was installed. I have yet to meet him.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938913 by Public Hand
Dec 12, 2016 7:20am
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Public Hands - this is done on the Hawaiian Islands also. I have participated in some of these celebrations. The disrespect I find in cemeteries is when people walk through the graves and not around. That is being disrespectful.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938965 by NatureMamaB6
Dec 12, 2016 8:29am
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on the Hawaiian Islands also

Yes, I know, we spend a great deal of time there too ;)

A lot of the West Coast cemeteries are planted in rows with plaques laying on the ground. This means you have to walk over them to read them and the plots are generally so close together, you've no choice in terms of "stepping on them" unless the plan is to have the lawn mowers driving over them the only stimulation they get.

As was already said, I'm a firm believer that the dead (regardless of whether you know them or not) deserve to be involved in daily activities.....a simple ongoing conversation with them, while boxing, keeps them from getting bored and I'd rather have some entertaining person chatting with me than to lie in silence waiting for the mowers.....
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938969 by Public Hand
Dec 12, 2016 11:13am
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Agreed - I have told the Demon that I would love to have a letterbox hidden in my headstone. Letterboxers will continue to visit me after I'm gone, and they'll be happy because they found a stamp.
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938906 by yakkman
Dec 12, 2016 12:20pm
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I letterboxed in Washington D.C., at the Congressional Cemetery. The staff promotes the letterboxing by having a brochure of the clues in the office. I enjoyed the tour and find letterboxing in cemeteries very enjoyable. I introduced some of my grandchildren to letterboxing in a cemetery because cemetery boxes have been easy to find. At 67 years old, I am closer to the grave than I am to the cradle and I would welcome letterboxing wherever I reside. :)
Re: missing boxes
Board: Traditional Letterboxes
Reply to: #938982 by Chickadee
Dec 12, 2016 12:38pm
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That's a WONDERFUL series, and you're right that the cemetery really embraces it. They also had several other initiatives - including limited dog walking by permit - that encouraged people to visit the cemetery and gather there.