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Msg: 872512
SeerMeesh Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: SeerMeeshProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 14, 2014 7:11 PM
P-86F-206M-669Inactive
Reply to: Msg 872511 by SeerMeesh
Or a one on one with someone who reenacts and loves the era? Maybe someone who can bring history to her? Or Skype?
Msg: 872513
SeerMeesh Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: SeerMeeshProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 14, 2014 7:12 PM
P-86F-206M-669Inactive
Reply to: Msg 872512 by SeerMeesh
I really hope I am helping and not just spouting off random ideas. Lol
Msg: 872579
Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: Uncorny AcornsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 15, 2014 1:13 PM
P-26F-214M-1110Inactive
Reply to: Msg 872505 by Teeker
I like this article...I'm going to have her look through it and encourage her to do more research on one of the dogs.
I've been trying to find different ways to get dogs involved in the state standards for history (medieval times) and while I find bits and pieces, there isn't a lot I can give her to work with. :-(
I did read that Adam of the Road is a medieval historical fiction with a lost dog...so it's on my library list for the week.

If you give a child an assignment and they don't do it or don't finish it, do you wait or try something new? Since I'm the "teacher" I'm finding she doesn't care about timelines. Which would be more okay if she were getting excited about doing work...
Msg: 872580
Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: Uncorny AcornsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 15, 2014 1:17 PM
P-26F-214M-1110Inactive
Reply to: Msg 872512 by SeerMeesh
Oh, you reminded me that Mr. Acorn knows how to make chainmail! He used to help out in an SCA armor shop. Maybe I can get her interested in making some chainmail jewelry and twist some historical perspective in there...
Fingers crossed!!!
Msg: 872593
TheKindlyVikings Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: TheKindlyVikingsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 15, 2014 3:53 PM
P-10F-266M-362
Reply to: Msg 872480 by Uncorny Acorns
Last year we read the story of Lewis and Clark from the perspective of Seaman, the dog that traveled with the expedition. It was pretty interesting.

We are using Trail Guide to Learning. It uses 6 week units to make an immersive study of history. All subjects (except math) are wrapped into the historic framework.

-TheKindlyVikings
Msg: 872619
SeerMeesh Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: SeerMeeshProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 15, 2014 7:21 PM
P-86F-206M-669Inactive
Reply to: Msg 872580 by Uncorny Acorns
What about games from that era? There was kick the cabbage. Lol
Msg: 872772
SITE Sleuths Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: SITE SleuthsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 17, 2014 6:07 AM
P-74F-581M-1149
Reply to: Msg 872395 by Uncorny Acorns
I didn't read through all the responses, so excuse me if this has already been said. I stopped when I read "history is boring", but also saw someone found the key of history when they said the genealogy was fun...

History is NOT about dates, It should be about PEOPLE.

Take away the tests about history and get to know some people and stories, even historical fiction puts history in a timeline, and help keep track who verses "1492". Focus on individual people, get to know them, The events will start to come together but don't worry about the dates, we live in a time where we can always look up the date, after all, I had to just now for the above date of Columbus. But if we know the people in an event we know how to look for the date. We love history in my house because it is like a great big old puzzle of people. Really get to know those people then you will meet their friends/enemies, and we end up learning their successes and mistakes. That is when you get all those little Ah-Ha moments of what they did and the timeline of how we got here (and hopefully how to not make all the same mistakes, which is what makes history important.)

(this post was approved by my 10-year-old homeschooler)
she was nodding her head so much I thought she became a bobble head.
Msg: 873092
Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: GeedyupProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 20, 2014 6:43 AM
P-12F-546M-253
Reply to: Msg 872579 by Uncorny Acorns
If you give a child an assignment and they don't do it or don't finish it, do you wait or try something new? Since I'm the "teacher" I'm finding she doesn't care about timelines.

It's tricky. In fact, I don't assign projects with a due date at all anymore. My kids are very "present tense" people. It works so much better to say, "Today, work on that project for 30 minutes." In fact, I use the timer A LOT. They know that they can be done when it rings, so they usually put in some good effort. I do have one daydreamer. He knows I'll set the timer over again if he just sits and dreams.

Something new that is working here: NO VIDEO GAMES until school is done for the day. This is the most motivating trick I have ever employed. They start math before breakfast, voluntarily, this year. I cannot get over how well this works to motivate them. Keep experimenting! Cool things happen.
Msg: 873167
SITE Sleuths Subject: Re: Resistant student
Author: SITE SleuthsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Oct 20, 2014 1:41 PM
P-74F-581M-1149
Reply to: Msg 873092 by Geedyup
I'm glad "no video games" works for you. I have a no games/tv/ipod rule here, but the one thing I have not been able to take away yet is her stories. She is an audio-book-aholic. I did try it once (and I was miserable all day) but she picked up the Bible and started reading it... How can a parent argue with THAT!? The other problem I have is she takes so long I can't get school done before the neighbors arrive, once school is out I have 4 kids standing on my porch waiting. (and a dog freaking out inside)
Msg: 876069
photopam Subject: Teaching directions
Author: photopamProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 8:34 AM
P-17F-730M-995
Okay, not a homeschoolers, but was unsure where else to put this. Figured you guys would know! ;)

My 8 year old is having trouble sorting out her directions, east, west, north, south. Mostly it's when it's northeast, southwest, etc.

Do you have any tips, games, etc. that can help her understand better? I know letterboxing is a good way to help too, so I figured this would be the best place to ask!

Thanks so much!
Msg: 876070
Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: Alaska hsmProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 8:39 AM
P-131F-478M-1599
Reply to: Msg 876069 by photopam
Never eat shredded wheat. Helps with remembering the directions. Mnemonics always helped me.
Msg: 876072
S and D Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: S and DProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 8:42 AM
P-159F-164M-2805PremiumInactive
Reply to: Msg 876069 by photopam
I taught my 3 yr old to read a compass by putting a few xs in tape around the yard. Then have him stand there, I would say find n. He would find north and walk until he found a prize. Usually a quarter, we did this for awhile and then went to subway to get a waffle come Sunday. He still knows how to do it. We made it a fun game with a big reward. He can still do it, but does make mistakes.
Msg: 876073
photopam Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: photopamProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 8:44 AM
P-17F-730M-995
Reply to: Msg 876070 by Alaska hsm
Her thing is she gets the sw,ne mixed up. Ask her where the store is from the house on a map, and if it's not a straight line, she gets confused. Say the store is NE from the house, she says SW. Or forgets the East. I had her draw a map on the driveway yesterday so we could move around it, and help her visualize better. Tried to explain to her that the compass rose moves with you. Just wondering if anyone had any ideas to help her "get it". It hasn't clicked for her yet.

Thanks!
Msg: 876076
Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: ShazbotProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 9:05 AM
P-32F-157M-80Inactive
Reply to: Msg 876073 by photopam
I don't have any words of wisdom, but wanted to share that I had similar issues with directions when I was a kid. I didn't get how north wasn't always straight ahead! Eventually I got it, and I ended up as salutatorian of my high school class, so being directionally challenged in elementary school fortunately did not have an impact on my future success. ;)
Msg: 876077
FloridaFour Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: FloridaFourProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 9:13 AM
P-75F-752M-6379
Reply to: Msg 876069 by photopam
I like the mnemonics and compass suggestions.

I would also start having her learn the United States map. Most kids can remember that California is west, and where the sun sets. The north is the North Pole and it is on top, and the East is where the sun rises, and you can figure out a state she might recognise.

I think visual and audio cues combined, help.

In my town, it is very flat and I can't see the coast... But I can reference a few different roads and then visualize where the ocean is, from there.

Getting her very familiar with your town's map will help, too. We rely so much on GPS usage, we don't have clear pictures in our heads of orientation

I'm sure my 9 year old would confuse the directions as well! I'm positive of it, actually.
Msg: 876078
Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: pinkProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 9:13 AM
P-24F-1317M-134Premium
Reply to: Msg 876070 by Alaska hsm
I learned NEVER EAT SOGGY WAFFLES... I like shredded wheat
Msg: 876080
crosscresent Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: crosscresentProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 9:23 AM
P-87F-238M-3249
Reply to: Msg 876069 by photopam
Take her letterboxing! With a compass! :)
Msg: 876082
Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: Hosmer'sProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 9:34 AM
P-32F-123M-1043Inactive
Reply to: Msg 876069 by photopam
This is how I taught my kids: http://egsc.usgs.gov/isb//pubs/teachers-packets/mapadventures/

It's fun and they still have directions down several years later.
Msg: 876090
photopam Subject: Re: Teaching directions
Author: photopamProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 11, 2014 10:17 AM
P-17F-730M-995
Reply to: Msg 876082 by Hosmer's
Oooh thanks! These look good. I'll try them out with her later.
Thanks!
Msg: 876491
Subject: Reluctant student update
Author: Uncorny AcornsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 13, 2014 10:22 AM
P-26F-214M-1110Inactive
I just wanted to thank everyone for their advice and say that the Dogs Unit Study plan is working!
I found a printable lapbook outline revolving around Dogs and tied into a Nature program that was at our library.
She actually asked to go to the library! And she's been doing some research on her own.

I'm trying my best to tweak it to include history...Most civilizations had dogs, and specific breeds came from certain historical eras. The hard part is trying to convey it all to her. Dogs in history is harder for a 12 year old to research if she doesn't already know something about the civilizations, and some of the information isn't entirely sensitive-kid friendly. (Graphic sacrificial descriptions, journal entries regarding war-dogs in South America...) But it's fascinating stuff. I think we can keep this going well beyond the 20 day suggested time frame! :-)
Msg: 876503
FloridaFour Subject: Re: Reluctant student update
Author: FloridaFourProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Nov 13, 2014 11:47 AM
P-75F-752M-6379
Reply to: Msg 876491 by Uncorny Acorns
Great! Keep with the theme as long as she is interested! :) working dogs, leader dogs, hunting, etc. Cool My daughter would love that, too.
Msg: 879725
Subject: Other Support Groups?
Author: Uncorny AcornsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Dec 9, 2014 10:18 AM
P-26F-214M-1110Inactive
Does anyone have another homeschool specific support group that you go to for ideas and suggestions and such?
I'm just not having a lot of luck with the Yahoo Groups I was referred to. I think I do better with bulletin board formats.

PS; any ideas for a My Little Pony inspired unit study at the Middle School level? We're starting to exhaust dogs and daughter asked if we could do MLP next...it's her only other obsession.
Msg: 879726
SITE Sleuths Subject: Re: Other Support Groups?
Author: SITE SleuthsProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Dec 9, 2014 11:01 AM
P-74F-581M-1149
Reply to: Msg 879725 by Uncorny Acorns
I also found Yahoo groups very frustrating. I have found friends online at web-seminars that after chatting in a chat room with I ask if we can connect on facebook and I have found that choosing people who I liked in a group setting are usually very supportive and like minded in an online support situation.

I don't have any help for MLP unit studies. My daughter learning style and my teaching style together has never done well with unit studies.
Msg: 879732
Dartmoor Dreamer Subject: Re: Other Support Groups?
Author: Dartmoor DreamerProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Dec 9, 2014 11:33 AM
P-337F-3055M-1740Premium
Reply to: Msg 879725 by Uncorny Acorns
I will ask my homeschool graduate about MLP ideas (yes, he's a brony)
Msg: 879735
Dartmoor Dreamer Subject: Re: Other Support Groups?
Author: Dartmoor DreamerProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Dec 9, 2014 11:46 AM
P-337F-3055M-1740Premium
Reply to: Msg 879725 by Uncorny Acorns
Hi, this is Dan, Dartmoor Dreamer's son. I am a successful graduate of home school, and a board-certified fan of My Little Pony. In addition, I have aspirations of child education.

I have some ideas, but first, what are you looking for when you say "unit study"? To be sure, MLP can be the subject of paragraphs or essays, including book report-style reviews of favorite episodes, and each of the main characters embodies a strong character trait that can be expanded upon. However, if you are looking for things like how to theme math problems or what elements of science are present in the show (that is, a full curriculum), that will require a good knowledge of the show to appropriately lay out.

If you are leaning towards the latter, the full curriculum, our idea is to take a more generic curriculum, one which you might already have or have access to, and add elements of harmo...I mean, of the show. Alternatively, you could divide the school year into sections and devote each section to a character in the show.

Of course, art and costumes lend themselves naturally to a subject like this (as my own costumes will attest).

Let me know if you'd like more information about the show specifically for any subject. I'd be willing to work up a grade-specific curriculum with you, whether for a specific subject or for a full curriculum.
Msg: 904102
MoonshineOverKY Subject: Homeschool Meet & Greet
Author: MoonshineOverKYProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Jul 9, 2015 5:49 PM
P-47F-790M-160Premium
I am hosting a homeschool letterboxing meet and greet in Northern, Kentucky. Monday, July 13th, 2015. Low key. Mostly will be introducing new folks to letterboxing - going over how-to, etc. Showing folks hot to navigate AtlasQuest. There will be an event box. If anyone is in the area and interested, message me.
Msg: 920134
Traveling Garden Gnome Subject: Homeschooling Success!!!
Author: Traveling Garden GnomeProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Feb 12, 2016 10:10 PM
P-4F-61M-308Inactive
I've posted on the homeschooling board off and on mostly to offer encouragement. I 'unschooled' my kids and allowed them to follow their passions from kindergarten until community college.

My daughter is dyslexic and didn't learn to read until the third grade. Almost three years behind her piers.

Today she got a call from Princeton University saying her application for grad school has been accepted!

I've been laughing and crying for hours now.

I am so very happy we choose homeschooling for her!

~Traveling Garden Gnome
Msg: 920135
Neen and Joy Subject: Re: Homeschooling Success!!!
Author: Neen and JoyProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Feb 12, 2016 10:23 PM
P-17F-398M-238
Reply to: Msg 920134 by Traveling Garden Gnome
Big congratulations to your daughter! And you for helping her achieve such a wonderful goal!
Msg: 920151
Subject: Re: Homeschooling Success!!!
Author: zinniProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Feb 13, 2016 8:11 AM
P-20F-145M-535Inactive
Reply to: Msg 920134 by Traveling Garden Gnome
Congratulations to your daughter! And you! I taught for several years and I can honestly say if my children were school age, I would home school them. A child can be unschooled and learn everything they need to know to get into a good college and have a good life. Good job, Mom!
Msg: 920457
MoonshineOverKY Subject: Re: Homeschooling Success!!!
Author: MoonshineOverKYProfileContactLogbookNote
Date: Feb 17, 2016 1:07 PM
P-47F-790M-160Premium
Reply to: Msg 920134 by Traveling Garden Gnome
That is amazing! Congrats! I just had a conversation with my husband today - wondering about our homeschooling journey - and if I've been failing the kids.... as homeschoolers - we never have these thoughts, right??? :) This is my 10th year homeschooling - kids have never been to a B&M. I'm always worried I'm falling short. So good to hear success stories!!!
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Board: Homeschooling
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